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Old 12-18-2010, 10:28 AM   #11
Meghan Reid
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Re: Rolfing?

I think it depends on the person and their pain tolerance. I am a giant pansy when it comes to pain. Honestly, for me it's a means to an end. It sucks really bad during but after I am always glad I did it. It's also not meant to be a continuing thing, like massage. It's really meant as a physical therapy exercise to help straighten you out after you've messed something up.

If nothing else, it has firmly reminded me that I need to fricking work on my flexibility already and my SMR because god, it sucks, and I don't want to have to keep getting it, that's for sure.
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Old 12-18-2010, 06:48 PM   #12
Jordan Buckelew
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Re: Rolfing?

Hey Meghan!

How exactly does it help with flexibility? I'm almost hyper mobile in my upper body, but so inflexible in my hamstrings that it's almost a joke. I've tried a lot of techniques to stretch them out to no avail. Could this help?
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Old 12-18-2010, 10:05 PM   #13
Meghan Reid
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Re: Rolfing?

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Originally Posted by Jordan Buckelew View Post
Hey Meghan!

How exactly does it help with flexibility? I'm almost hyper mobile in my upper body, but so inflexible in my hamstrings that it's almost a joke. I've tried a lot of techniques to stretch them out to no avail. Could this help?
It could. I'll let you know once I've gone through a few more sessions.

She said in the case of my hamstrings, they're not so much "bound up" as they are "so tight they are tender to the touch." She wants to do one or two more sessions just to see, so I'll let you know what my results are.
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Old 12-19-2010, 01:14 AM   #14
Jordan Buckelew
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Re: Rolfing?

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Originally Posted by Meghan Leigh Ramos View Post
It could. I'll let you know once I've gone through a few more sessions.

She said in the case of my hamstrings, they're not so much "bound up" as they are "so tight they are tender to the touch." She wants to do one or two more sessions just to see, so I'll let you know what my results are.
Cheers! that would be awesome
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Old 12-19-2010, 06:08 AM   #15
Brian Strump
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Re: Rolfing?

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Originally Posted by Jordan Buckelew View Post
Hey Meghan!

How exactly does it help with flexibility? I'm almost hyper mobile in my upper body, but so inflexible in my hamstrings that it's almost a joke. I've tried a lot of techniques to stretch them out to no avail. Could this help?

Picture this, it should help.

Imagine a rope. And understand that a muscle is made up of 100's of ropes. Now, tie a knot in a few of the ropes. The knot is a trigger point. With this knot, the length of the rope(your muscle) is shortened, and may feel tight and/or painful.
Now pull each end of the rope(you stretching), and what happens to the knot? It gets more tight! Short term, you'll have alittle more length, and you'll feel good after stretching, but each time, you are making those knots tighter and tighter. BAD, BAD, BAD for the trigger points! Which is most likely why you, and most try alot of stretching only techniques to no avail.
They need to be combined with other therapies, self or professionally to get rid of the trigger points in that muscle. Active and latent trigger points, not just the ones currently generating pain. Eventually the body will compensate for the latent(not causing pain...yet) T.P's, and they'll become active.
Also helpful, would be to find someone familiar with pain referral patterns, and not just cram a tennis ball into muscles because that's where it hurts. You will not be successful in the long term in "chasing" pain; you need to find the source and get after it.

Hope that helps.
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Old 12-20-2010, 05:58 AM   #16
Meghan Reid
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Re: Rolfing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Strump View Post
Picture this, it should help.

Imagine a rope. And understand that a muscle is made up of 100's of ropes. Now, tie a knot in a few of the ropes. The knot is a trigger point. With this knot, the length of the rope(your muscle) is shortened, and may feel tight and/or painful.
Now pull each end of the rope(you stretching), and what happens to the knot? It gets more tight! Short term, you'll have alittle more length, and you'll feel good after stretching, but each time, you are making those knots tighter and tighter. BAD, BAD, BAD for the trigger points! Which is most likely why you, and most try alot of stretching only techniques to no avail.
They need to be combined with other therapies, self or professionally to get rid of the trigger points in that muscle. Active and latent trigger points, not just the ones currently generating pain. Eventually the body will compensate for the latent(not causing pain...yet) T.P's, and they'll become active.
Also helpful, would be to find someone familiar with pain referral patterns, and not just cram a tennis ball into muscles because that's where it hurts. You will not be successful in the long term in "chasing" pain; you need to find the source and get after it.

Hope that helps.
Brilliant. Love it.
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:12 AM   #17
Jim Pascucci
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Re: Rolfing?

Brian, good analogy about chasing pain. Dr. Rolf in her wisdom admonished us to work "where it ain't", not the best grammar but gets the point across about chasing symptoms.
Even though I've studied Trigger Points, used it as an explanation for client's symptoms, and even created an animation for my students to better understand referral patterns, I'm not convinced they exist. Dr's. Travell and Simmons are very convincing in their research with the exception of physical evidence of the TP. In the last 5 years I've become more aware/trained, in working with nerves. (Which much better explains TP activity than the myofascial restriction theory does.) One reason for this is my study with fellow Rolfer Don Hazen DC. he wrote a brilliant paper "The Posture of Neurology" which you should be able to find it through google, if you're interested.
Since learning to be more sensitive to the potential nerve involvement in postural issues, I've become more concerned when I hear people suggest that one should work with a body in a painful way. Of course some people erroneously equate pain with "depth" of treatment and will always seek out the painful therapy. I have folks come to me because I work with horses, and they assume that I must be able to push hard and therefore deep.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:12 AM   #18
William Hunter
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Re: Rolfing?

Trigger points exist. They're doing some very cool microanalytical techniques at the NIH in Bethesda, led by a guy named Jay Shah, MD. TrPs have a unique biochemical make up which is different from surrounding tissue.

That being said, TrPs may be more of a reaction to a problem than the actual source.

Graston doesn't have to hurt that much. It's all relative.
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Old 12-22-2010, 01:19 PM   #19
Meghan Reid
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Re: Rolfing?

It definitely doesn't always hurt that much. In fact it's nowhere near that painful on my shoulder. I think that my hamstrings are just a sensitive spot.
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Old 12-22-2010, 07:32 PM   #20
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Re: Rolfing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by William Hunter View Post
Trigger points exist. They're doing some very cool microanalytical techniques at the NIH in Bethesda, led by a guy named Jay Shah, MD. TrPs have a unique biochemical make up which is different from surrounding tissue.

That being said, TrPs may be more of a reaction to a problem than the actual source.

Graston doesn't have to hurt that much. It's all relative.
That's a very good point, but unfortunately I don't think the source is very well understood at this point. Some of the psychsomatic pain experts out there claim that trigger points result from suppressed emotions and stress and tend to be most common in the low back and shoulders. Makes a lot of sense, but unfortunately the connection between the mind and physical pain isn't really well understood.

That said, I love trigger point work. Sometimes it can hurt like hell, but I usually feel better afterwards. The pecs and traps are surprisingly painful lol. Funny cuz the hamstrings never really bothered me. And for most people, getting the psoas worked on is the worst, but I've never had any major issues with that. Pecs, traps, lower abs and QL are the worst for me.
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