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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 12-20-2015, 12:37 PM   #21
Shawn M Wilson
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Re: Redefining the relationship between Power and Intensity

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Originally Posted by Chris Mason View Post
Right, what I am saying is that the term in its strength training world "proper" definition is a measure of the load vs. individual one rep max capacity (1RM) in a given exercise. If your 1RM bench press is 200 lbs and you use 200 lbs you are at 100% intensity.

In that sentence you quoted I was just saying the above in a slightly different fashion.
I'll have some fun here with this but just as a jumping off point I agree with what you wrote.

So does intensity stay consistent or change based on each day?

Let's look at training days vs competition days.

In competitions I often do A LOT better than a typical day in the gym. It's weird / funny how I can power clean 265 in a competition and yet struggle to squat clean that same amount in the gym.

Both days I feel like I'm giving 100% of that current day. One guy at my box said I cannot be giving 100% intensity because I'm not achieving the same results as I do on my meet days.

Obviously I'm attempting to give the same intensity but is my power level lower thus causing a change in my intensity or is my intensity causing a change in my ability to produce power? (Because obviously the guy in my box struggles to understand how some days you feel stronger and more prepared (wave training) for a comp).
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Old 12-21-2015, 04:50 PM   #22
Chris Mason
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Re: Redefining the relationship between Power and Intensity

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Originally Posted by Shawn M Wilson View Post
I'll have some fun here with this but just as a jumping off point I agree with what you wrote.

So does intensity stay consistent or change based on each day?

Let's look at training days vs competition days.

In competitions I often do A LOT better than a typical day in the gym. It's weird / funny how I can power clean 265 in a competition and yet struggle to squat clean that same amount in the gym.

Both days I feel like I'm giving 100% of that current day. One guy at my box said I cannot be giving 100% intensity because I'm not achieving the same results as I do on my meet days.

Obviously I'm attempting to give the same intensity but is my power level lower thus causing a change in my intensity or is my intensity causing a change in my ability to produce power? (Because obviously the guy in my box struggles to understand how some days you feel stronger and more prepared (wave training) for a comp).
Well, it would depend on what you are basing the percentage off of. A meet max is a psychologically stimulated maximum and thus a true 1RM (for all intents and purposes).

Of course, if progress is being made then your 1RM is always changing. Intensity, and its percentages are thus approximations.

In the end, the point of the intensity scale is really just to permit planning for training.
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:35 AM   #23
Shawn M Wilson
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Re: Redefining the relationship between Power and Intensity

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Originally Posted by Chris Mason View Post
Well, it would depend on what you are basing the percentage off of. A meet max is a psychologically stimulated maximum and thus a true 1RM (for all intents and purposes).

Of course, if progress is being made then your 1RM is always changing. Intensity, and its percentages are thus approximations.

In the end, the point of the intensity scale is really just to permit planning for training.
I agree on all points of that which brings back and old discussion that has been discussed here a few times but often without the topic of intensity to much.

When training we are looking at increasing our 1RM most often in regards to weight training (vs 5rm, etc).

Entire programs are written around that goal and the topic of debate comes up on which program does it best. Often we talk about a training max versus a competition max and using the training max for the program %s. THis often confuses some people as they may not compete and don't understand the difference in intensity between the gym and a competition.

On competition day my mind is focused, my body is primed and each lift has as much CNS and muscle output as possible. I do feel a bit drained later in the day but during that short period of time I am riding high.

Realizing that doing this every day would be difficult because of the amount of effort and focus one has to put into "pumping" oneself up for this moment helps to me understand why my intensity seems so much less in a normal gym day.

We see issues in overtraining in boxes when intensity in WODs is high for weeks on end and people can't recover and injuries and overtraining pops up. I have seen trainers struggle to figure out why their people are dropping like flies when every WOD is a hero or games one day after day. The constant pressure to succeed and do better bogs down all but the elite athlete quickly.

So understanding the concept of intensity, the different levels of intensity and how to properly program and train around it is where success is found or burn out and injury takes over.

As we learn to better control the training and desired level of intensity I think we can effectively start to see ways to increase the other areas discussed (power, etc) by again developing or using well designed training programs that create positive gains in 1RM, cardiovascular improvements, etc by managing the athletes intensity over the long haul.

I know since I scaled by on my intensity in training and focused more on other areas (volume, recovery, technique, strength) my lifts have improved in both training and competition. Sometimes this means I do my own thing at the box (much to the displeasure of some fellow box mates) and sometimes I do the WOD simply for a break and recovery of my current training.
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Old 12-24-2015, 12:40 PM   #24
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Re: Redefining the relationship between Power and Intensity

Right. That is one problem I have seen in the CF world in general. The crowd mentality and support of others really pumps people up and every training day becomes like a meet day. In other words, the training is fueled by adrenaline. The problem, as you noted, is stagnation and burnout. One simply cannot go all out in an elevated state with great frequency and not overtrain.
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Old 05-29-2016, 01:31 PM   #25
Sean J Hunter
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Re: Redefining the relationship between Power and Intensity

I'm big on using terminology correctly, so did some digging on this.

WHAT IS IT (PHYSICS)
Intensity, as we use it incorrectly in fitness, has three variables
1 - A constant which is 100% of energy usage in the system (body). Often referred to as reps max, or max fatigue
2 - An inverse correlation between weight and time to use all energy (namely reps)

THE TERM
Yes, I think we use intensity colloqually...."man that 1RM intense"
But in physics sounds intensity for example when compared to our situation is..
A constant variable the energy being produces, let's say an alarm going off
Is then applied to two other inversely correlated variables, the sound and the volume is ha to fill
As the sounds travels away from the source point its intensity (loudness) decreases as it was greater volume (a larger area / circle) to fill.

The constant energy (Sound) being released from the point source could be compared the constant of intensity which is 100$ energy usage (reps max)

The sound moving away from the point source has to fill greater volume, this volume increase could be compared to reps 1 rep is less area 10 reps is a greater area.

When the reps (area) is low, the weight (sound intensity) can be greater.

Although I believe the term Intensity likely originated colloquially ("Man that 1RM was intense"), it can be argued that without a discrete term to describe the correlation between how quickly a system is using energy (weight per rep) and how quickly that system will run out of energy (with-in 5 reps), the term intensity (physics) can be highjacked.

Hope this makes sense.

CF essentially sells High Intensity Programming that creates far greater neuroendocrine response for less investment than typical Gym "Mod Training". so CF delivers a far greater return on investment.

Even the UNs world health org, has gotten in on the act and started redefining its fitness prescription to include high intensity and weights.

My main issue is this, my experience so far is that High Intensity has a negative connotation to the public, it sounds scary, and has been high-jacked by the media as dangerous.

We use Neuroendocrine Training...out this can sound a little snakeoil-ish to the avg punter.

Just some thoughts.

Sean
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