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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 02-29-2004, 07:29 AM   #11
bill fox
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Jay

Sounds like good self-analysis - 2 thoughts

1) Work on the fixed position at the top. Coach Sommer has written some articles you should read at Dragon Door. Be able to hold that top position for 60 sec before you dip. ( this is highly amatuer advice from me as I am new to rings - hopefully Tyler will chime in)

2)work on your body tension. Quads and butt flexed, abs locked, shoulders packed, arm pits tight - if the rings are unstable because yuor body is moving your going to have a lot more trouble.
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Old 02-29-2004, 08:26 AM   #12
Kris Freeman
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I can tell you that it is very beneficial for me to use tension techniques when doing any kind of dips. It helps me stay tight, focused, and keeps my shoulders protected. Protection for the shoulders is very important for me on dips.
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Old 02-29-2004, 05:44 PM   #13
Tyler Hass
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Bill,
You're right on. In the support position, you can start out with the rings held in tight against your hips and keep them there as you dip. It becomes much harder when you break contact from your body and actively stabilize the rings.
In the support, you should be pushing down on the rings at all times and you should feel some serious lat engagement. This is the real difference between the effectiveness of ring dips versus p-bar dips. You must keep your lats tight with ring dips.
When you get up to support, push down and try to keep your armpits tight. And as Bill said, all of the tension techniques are critical. I just filmed a video on ring training with the current world champion on rings, Jordan Jovtchev. The most common advice he gives, regardless of the exercise, is to stay tight.
Once you get comfortable with the support away from your body, then work on proper form. Rings turned out, no part of your arm touches the ring or cables. The pros have to meet this requirement on handstands too. As if handstands on rings weren't hard enough!
Sorry, I assumed it was your elbows. I had an anonymous e-mail from someone that was having elbow pain from L-sits on parallettes, so I guess I got my wires crossed.

Tyler
www.ringtraining.com
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Old 02-29-2004, 06:43 PM   #14
Brian Hand
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Jay, dips are notoriously hard on the shoulders, especially if you have ever separated the shoulder. The stretch is extreme, so be careful!

It seems I was able to develop some of the stabilization for ring dips with ring pushups.
I am a machine with bar dips, but ring dips were humbling. I found that after a couple months focusing on ring pushups, "archers," and flies, I was able to do a respectable number of ring dips. Even so, the AC joint felt a little sore the next day - so again, be careful.
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Old 03-01-2004, 03:16 PM   #15
Ben Gimball
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Brian,

How many "bar dips" can you perform? And how low do you go? I have found that at a certain point the shoulder joint is in a very unstable position.
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Old 03-01-2004, 03:34 PM   #16
Mike Yukish
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I had a Grade III separation back in November. To rehab, I did lots of pullups and pushups, and then got on the WOD bandwagen in early December.

Handstands were not an option for about a month and a half, but are fine now. Surprisingly, dips have been fine. The shoulder still looks major league funky, with the AC joint poking up. My dip range has been increasing, until I can go hands to armpits now. Haven't done rings yet. I expect to be humbled.

I find that wide dip bars cause problems for me, so I am sure to use bars that are just wide enough for me to fit between. It keeps the elbows in.
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Old 03-01-2004, 06:38 PM   #17
Brian Hand
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Ben, I didn't mean to brag, I meant relative to my other capabilities I am good at dips, above average. I'm good for fifty bar dips any time weighing about 220, a few more on a good day.

I do dips kind of like I do squats - forearms stay still, more or less upright, and I go low enough that the upper arms break parallel. If I kind of flare the lats and "lock in" they go easy, same as pushups. Without locking in with the lats thirty is tough.

I agree that past a certain position they don't feel right, and I don't like letting the elbows flare outward, or using a wide grip / wide set of bars.
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Old 03-02-2004, 11:26 AM   #18
Ben Gimball
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Brian.

50 bar dips is outstanding! I congratulate you especially in light of the fact that you weigh 220 pounds. That is what I call superb endurance strength!

Do you train them every day, every other day?
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Old 03-02-2004, 06:37 PM   #19
Brian Hand
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Ben, thans for the kind words, it's not really too impressive, they come easy for me.

I don't always train dips, since it is not a weak point. When I do work on dips, it's once or twice a week. I'll test max reps on Friday, and might do a workout of several submaximal sets Monday or Tuesday. I will try experimenting with tempo, form, and concentration to make them tougher rather than adding weight in those workouts.

Once I figured out the "locking off" with the lats thing (just experimenting over time) I jumped from 30-35 reps to 50 pretty quickly.
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Old 03-02-2004, 10:16 PM   #20
Ryan Atkins
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Brian,

Interesting point about locking out with the lats. I'll have to give that a try. I should have thought about it sooner. A friend of mine told me how much more solid his bench became after conciously tensing the lats during the movement. I think he said he was intorduced to the idea from material written by Louie Simmons.

Ryan
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