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Old 09-24-2006, 10:13 PM   #1
Kevin McKay
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I was not aware that sweet potatoes can be eaten raw. I would assume that unprepared they would have a lower glycemic index is that correct?

Thanks
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Old 09-25-2006, 02:47 PM   #2
Kevin McKay
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Anybody?
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Old 09-25-2006, 04:15 PM   #3
Greg Battaglia
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Any uncooked carbohydrate-containg food will have a lower GI. When you cook the veggy to break up most of the cellulose (fiber) that caused the slow absorption to begin with. As for eating SP's raw, I wouldn't do it. Check out this chart. http://www.geo-pie.cornell.edu/issues/toxins.html
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Old 09-25-2006, 04:48 PM   #4
Andy Shirley
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Greg,
Was there any info in that link related to cooking vs not cooking sweet pototoes?

I missed the point.
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Old 09-25-2006, 05:55 PM   #5
Scott Kustes
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Andy, Kevin asked two questions. #1 was regarding eating sweet potatoes raw, #2 was regarding GI. The link answered #1 and Greg's other commentary answered #2.
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Old 09-25-2006, 06:08 PM   #6
Kevin McKay
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I do not see mention of cooking neutralizing the anti nutrients?
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Old 09-25-2006, 08:40 PM   #7
Andy Shirley
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Nor did I. There is nothing on that page, except that sweet pototoes have cyanogenic glycosides, as do all stone fruits, and many other fruits. No mention of cooked vs raw. Therefore the link answered nothing, hence my question of its relevance.

Find me a study, saying cooking neutralizes these, and that would answer #1. But then we'd have to cook apples, apricots, raspberries, cherries. Cassava is very high in these as well, from Wiki regarding cassava/manioc:

"root cannot be consumed raw, since it contains free and bound cyanogenic glucosides which are converted to cyanide in the presence of linamarase, a naturally occurring enzyme in cassava. Cassava varieties are often categorized as either "sweet" or "bitter", signifying the absence or presence of toxic levels of cyanogenic glucosides. The so-called "sweet" (actually "not bitter") cultivars can produce as little as 20 milligrams of cyanide (HCN) per kilogram of fresh roots, while "bitter" ones may produce more than 50 times as much (1 g/kg). Cassavas grown during drought are especially high in these toxins. [1] [2]

For some smaller-rooted "sweet" varieties, cooking is sufficient to eliminate all toxicity. The larger-rooted "bitter" varieties used for production of flour or starch must be processed to remove the cyanogenic glucosides. The large roots are peeled and then ground into flour, which is then soaked in water, squeezed dry several times, and toasted. The starch grains that float to the surface during the soaking process are also used in cooking.[3]"

Not even cooking gets rid of all of it, and they mush be processed. Oh no, not processed food!
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:59 AM   #8
Yael Grauer
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Eww, why would you eat 'em raw?? Why not just wait until they're ready?? :puke0000:

I don't know about the GI of sweet potatoes, but raw potatoes have pyrithryns which can mess up your stomach lining. Then again, frying and oven-baking them can create acrylamide. (Boiling is okay.) On the other hand, they have antioxidants, vitamins, etc.

"You play, you win. You play, you lose. You play." --Jeanette Winterson (yeah, that's out of context, she wasn't talkin' about potatoes.)
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Old 09-26-2006, 04:59 AM   #9
Jonathon Edward
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Nearly all plant foods are going to contain toxins in one form or another. Avoiding said foods would result in an extremely bland diet lacking in micronutrients. The lesson learned here is that variety is a crucial element of any healthy eating program. By constantly rotating your food choices, you avoid the potential problems associated with accumulating high levels of specific toxins.

DeVany talks about this in great detail on his blog, and applys the same logic to rotating macronutrients. By rotating carbs, protein, fats, and foods, we're not only ensuring a surplus of nutrients necessary to optimize health, but also avoiding the potential health problems created by monotonous/static approaches to nutrition.
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Old 09-26-2006, 07:51 PM   #10
Greg Battaglia
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The point I was trying to make is that cyanogenic glucosides are present in raw sweet potatoes. Cyanogenic glucosides are toxic to humans, therefore it would be wise to cook the sweet potatoes before consuming them in order to lower the toxic load. I assumed that you would've realized that I was implying that cooking was a way of removing the CG's since that was the context of your question. If you didn't already know, cyanogenic glucosides are highly reactive pro-oxidants. Without getting into the many reasons why you might want to avoid oxidation, it would benefit you to limit them. As Johnathon said, variety is important to avoid dangerous levels of any particular toxin, but it also doesn't hurt to lower the total toxic load being placed on your system.
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