CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-20-2008, 01:39 PM   #1
Leslie Powell
Member Leslie Powell is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: New York  NY
Posts: 347
Interesting NY Times article on cycling

Assuming I'm reading it correctly, there are a couple of parts of this (WFS) article on cycling training:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/19/fa...fad&ei=5087%0A

that overlap nicely w/Crossfit, up to a point.

Quality equipment is stressed over super-expensive (i.e. you might need a $1,500 bike, but you don't need a $10,000 bike).

There's a section discussing the fact that riders are using watts (power-produced) to gauge their progress (not heart rate or anything else) i.e. your goal is to increase your ability to generate power. The need to increase power for short, medium, and long durations is discussed.

Another section talks about a refueling snack that includes ham and eggs. It also has a buttload of white rice, but I suppose that in this context an increase in carbs is kind of a necessity. It's outside my area of experience: do any endurance types, going through 500 calories an hour for hours at a time, use fat for fuel instead? Anyway, it sounds better than glucose gell.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2008, 06:37 PM   #2
Ed Hamilton
Member Ed Hamilton is offline
 
Ed Hamilton's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Montgomery  Al
Posts: 179
Re: Interesting NY Times article on cycling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leslie Powell View Post
Assuming I'm reading it correctly, there are a couple of parts of this (WFS) article on cycling training:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/19/fa...fad&ei=5087%0A

that overlap nicely w/Crossfit, up to a point.
As a long time competitive cyclist (and newby to crossfit) I'd like to shed some light on this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leslie Powell View Post
Quality equipment is stressed over super-expensive (i.e. you might need a $1,500 bike, but you don't need a $10,000 bike).
If you are talking about a road bike, this is spot on. For a mountain bike, the difference between a $1500 bike & a $4000 bike is much bigger since durability begins to come into play. The most important component of any bike though is wheels. You are almost always better off with a low end component group and nice wheels than the other way around.

A wise man once said "Light. Strong. Cheap. Pick two."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leslie Powell View Post
There's a section discussing the fact that riders are using watts (power-produced) to gauge their progress (not heart rate or anything else) i.e. your goal is to increase your ability to generate power. The need to increase power for short, medium, and long durations is discussed.
This is true. Power meters, while still expensive ($1500) are the way to go. Since there are so many variables in cycling (wind, rolling resistance, road grade etc) this is the only true way to gauge how much work you are doing. On the rower you have pace, running has min/mile, lifting has lbs., now cycling has watts.

If a rider can increase his power output, he will go faster. Power to weight ratio is also huge, especially when the road turns up. I'm about 150 lbs. One of my riding buddies is about 220. On the flats he kills me since he can produce way more power than I can, but on a climb, especially a steep climb, I'll drop him like a bad habit!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leslie Powell View Post
Another section talks about a refueling snack that includes ham and eggs. It also has a buttload of white rice, but I suppose that in this context an increase in carbs is kind of a necessity. It's outside my area of experience: do any endurance types, going through 500 calories an hour for hours at a time, use fat for fuel instead? Anyway, it sounds better than glucose gell.
The problem with having too much fat in a food used during a long ride is that it tends to be more difficult to digest. There is also a misconception about the gels that many enduro nuts like myself use. While it is true that some brands are basically just sugar (Honey Stinger comes to mind) many others such as Hammer Gel are most if not all complex carbs that don't give that that big "rush and crash" like you would think.

I recently did a 12 hour mountain bike race and followed this nutrition strategy that has served me well in the past;

For every one hour lap I consumed 1 water bottle filled with a mixture of half Gatorade Rain & half water and ate 250 calories of food in the form of a Powerbar, Cliff Bar or the like. I also took 2 Hammer Endurolytes (for electrolytes to help prevent cramps) and 2 Sportslegs capsules (they help buffer lactic acid & ease "leg burn")

Anyway (this got LONG!) nutrition for an endurance event (especially one over 6 hours) is a highly individual thing and should be ironed out in training. As for that training and the part that Crossfit can play, I'm still experimenting. I've been to the Crossfit Endurance website, & I'm not sure I agree with all of their philosophies, but that's a whole other topic!

BTW here's my race report from the 12 hour;

http://compvelo.com/content/index.ph...id=99&Itemid=2

Last edited by David Wood : 06-21-2008 at 10:31 AM. Reason: fixed initial quote so it read correctly
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Did You See The Article In Newyork Times!!!! Abby Federmann Community 5 03-30-2008 01:36 PM
"Lean Times" article Jeremy Jones Community 1 11-18-2006 03:59 AM
LA Times article Martin Schap Community 3 04-10-2006 11:41 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.