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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 02-12-2004, 08:44 PM   #1
Patrick Johnston
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I realize that we generally score tabatas based upon the lowest number of reps in any of the eight intervals multiplied by eight. I also understand that there is a difference in terms of performance between an effort that produces 17 reps per interval for a score of 136 than an effort that results in 20 reps in each of the first 4 intervals followed by 2 15s and 2 13s (though the total reps is the same). I recognize that the method that we use of scoring differentiates between these two efforts.

However, I find that the scoring system as it is, tends to discourage maximum performance. That is to say that one is not rewarded for achieving the maximum number of repititions in each given interval, but rather for allocating the repititions more strategically. Do others find that they often stop before they reach their max in a given interval precisely because they realize that they probably can't keep up that pace and thus their score will suffer? For instance, I can get 20 reps in the first few squat intervals, but doing so certainly won't result in my best score as I will pay for this effort in later intervals. In some sense, I feel like this scoring prevents me from giving my all in every interval.

I'm not sure that I've sufficiently expressed myself here but does anyone have any thoughts on this?
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Old 02-12-2004, 09:00 PM   #2
Scott McAndrews
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I think it would best, physical development wise, to not worry about your score and just go all out on each round. As you become more fit, even your late rounds will improve. I think that if you hold something back in the early rounds, then you may not get the best workout that you possibly can.
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Old 02-12-2004, 10:15 PM   #3
Patrick Johnston
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That is my point exactly Scott. But, competitive juices being what they are, we want to achieve as high a score as possible.
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Old 02-13-2004, 12:28 AM   #4
Ryan Atkins
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What about altering the scoring? Maybe take the average number of reps/round as opposed to the lowest number in a round. This way, regardless of what round you're at, every rep counts. If others could be convinced to follow suit, you could realize full benefits of the tabata protocol while maintaining fair competition.

Just a thought,

Ryan
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Old 02-13-2004, 07:08 AM   #5
Scott McAndrews
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I'd say that Ryans idea is probably a better way to score overall. However, just to be a devil's advocate, it could also be argued that taking only the lowest of one's all out best pushes us to make even our lowest all out effort "respectable".
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Old 02-13-2004, 09:01 AM   #6
Barry Cooper
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In my personal case, I pick a number based on experience, and stick with it. I'm not doing my max set to begin with, but I guarantee I am by the end. My last 2 sets of Tabata Squats are invariably very painful. My feeling is that if I go absolutely all out to begin with, I don't finish the workout. That's no good either. Coach is usually pretty good about creating simple but clever scoring systems to force us to use a bit of strategy. Nothing wrong with strategy.
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Old 02-13-2004, 09:15 AM   #7
Patrick Johnston
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Barry:

So if you added one more rep to the first two intervals, this would be an improvement in your performance but not in your scoring. The current system has large incremental differences between scores. For instance, the difference between a score of 160 and 152 is enormous.

By the way, upon initial consideration, I like Ryan's idea.
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Old 02-13-2004, 09:18 AM   #8
Scott Kustes
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I think the flaw in Ryan's scoring (while being a good alternative) is that you would have to remember (or write down) 8 numbers, rather than just going "1st set: 20, 2nd set:18, remember 18" and having to remember 1 number.

I think that as competitors trying to get the best possible workout/score, we should be striving to push ourselves more rather than focusing strictly on the score. I don't think there's any bonus to getting a high score if you know that you didn't push yourself as hard as you could've.
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Old 02-13-2004, 09:37 AM   #9
Barry Cooper
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I think there might be some differing ideas on the scoring. Usually, to my understanding, the score is your lowest rep set. My best Tabata ever was 19. This means my worst set was 19. Theoretically, I could have done 22/22/22/22/22/22/22/19, and my score would be 19. In my experience, though, that sequence would for me have gone 22/22/21/20/18/16/10/10. Score of 10. The structure of the scoring ensures a minimal amount of work. With a score of 19, I did a minimum of 152 reps in four minutes. That's a lot of work, no matter how you cut it up.
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Old 02-13-2004, 10:55 AM   #10
Ryan Atkins
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Scott M. - maybe another way to ensure an athlete tries his hardest on every set would be to draw a number (1-8) out of hat after completion of the tabata rounds. The athlete's score would be the number of reps on the round indicated. This is a little contrived, but would be amusing for a group of eight athletes competing against each other (they all draw so the numbers are all used).

Scott K. - I like the point you made in your second paragraph. With regards to remembering the numbers though - can't you just keep a notepad near by and write down the reps during your 10 second break. It might push us harder compared to just standing/sitting/puking around waiting for the next set to start.:happy:

Ryan
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