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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 11-21-2005, 01:47 PM   #1
Dave Swartz
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Hey all. Two days ago my WOD was Helen as prescribed, except I substituted a 20lb dumbbell. The next day I did a very strenuous mountain bike ride. After the ride and especially today (the day after the ride – two days after Helen) my groin is really stiff and sore. Specifically, I think it’s my Adductor Longus (checked out an anatomy site on the web, so I’m not sure if I’ve got the correct muscle). I’ve never had this soreness before after a ride, so I think Helen’s kettlebell swings did it to me.

OK, finally to my questions. Are sore Adductor Longus’ common after kettlebell swings and walking lunges? Might this be an indication of bad technique? What will a stronger Adductor Longus improve in terms of physical performance (jump higher, run faster, etc)?

Thanks

Dave
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Old 11-21-2005, 04:45 PM   #2
Nikki Young
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Mountain bike riding will use every muscle in your legs. Walking lunges, especially if you haven't done them for a while, will probably leave you sore the next day or 2 or ... 4. During a lunge the main muscles being used are quad muscles; rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius. As well as the gluteas maximus.

When doing the DB swings, when You start to go down into the squat position, foot placement will play a part in which muscles become more actived. If your feet are directly foward, the adductors aren't being activated as much as they would if you widened your stance and your toes pointing outwards. In my opinion you might have been doing more of the 'power squat', which is the squat where your toes are pointing out. This squat specifically works your inner thighs and all the adductor muscles; adductor longus, adducour magnus, adductor brevis, pectineus and gracilis. But will also be activating the quads, gluteals, hamstrings and the sacrospinalis muscles.

Strengthening the adductor/abductors, will help with physical performance because they assist in the movments you mentioned, such as jumping higher etc. If your adductor/abductor muscles where really weak compaired to your quads and hamstrings, they won't be of much assistance to your other muscles to help with these movements. Keeping a good balance in muscle strength is neccessary for optimal performance, so you need to make sure that you don't end up with something like a muscle imbalance.
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Old 11-21-2005, 09:06 PM   #3
Tom Corrigan
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Nikki made some great points, and I'd like t add a bit from and experienced KBer.

When doing swings, most people take a slightly wider than shoulder width stance with toes turned out. Mainly this is due to a fear of smashing your knees/shins and the need for feeling stable. Try to move your feet in, and keep your feet & knees facing forward. If you want to work on your adductors, etc. more, try doing double KB swings.
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Old 11-22-2005, 02:47 AM   #4
Andy Shirley
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I notes a similar soreness after the WOD with the one arm swings and PU. That made me more sore than anything I've done in a long time(2nd only to the FS WOD).

Looking back at my technique, I am sure I had a wide stance and toes out, as was using a dumbell.
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Old 11-22-2005, 08:40 AM   #5
Dave Swartz
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Wow. Thanks for the great feedback! I was definitely doing my KB swings with a wide, toes outward posture.

Nikki, in your post you mentioned a lot of muscles involved in walking lunges – none of which were the adductor longus. I am always real stiff and sore in the groin after walking lunges. Could this soreness after walking lunges indicate a muscle imbalance? I’m also wondering if this could affect my squats. Believe it or not, I have a much better OH squat than regular squat (not that my OH squat is good, just better than my squat). Do you think there is any connection?

Tom, You mentioned double KB swings. I’m assuming a double is a KB in each hand that is the RX’d weight and you swing them together? I’m uncoordinated enough to make a whole lot of noise if those suckers aren’t swung together!

Thanks again,

Dave
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Old 11-22-2005, 09:43 AM   #6
Kenneth Urakawa
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One other quick idea re: groin--

When you do swings, are you doing a lot of knee flexion, really dropping the hips down into a squat?

Speaking strictly for swings, sometimes relatively less knee bend is better than more--so you are moving your hips more front-and-back instead of up-and-down. It's a little more efficient, and you're involving your groin area a lot less.

Tom (or any of the kettlebell guys), am I off base with this?
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Old 11-22-2005, 02:40 PM   #7
Nikki Young
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Dave - Lunges do involve the adductor muscles, just not as much as the quads and gluteals. If you go to this link, and click on 'View muscles used' it will show you a picture, muscles being used are high-lighted in blue. http://www.ballyfitness.com/rapid_re...s/video.asp?33

It's not un-common to feel tightness in the adductors, as they are being used. However if your feeling more tight in your adductors than your glutes/quads or hamstrings, you might want to consider strengthening the adductors as well as working on some flexibility throughout the whole legs, which might help, but i'm not too sure about the muscle imbalance Q'n sorry, hopefully someone else could pitch in.

With lunges, your primarily working your glutes, however 2 ways you can do a lunge. 1) taking a simple step foward will specifically work the Quad. and 2) taking a big step foward will place more emphasis on the hamstring and glutes while stretching the hip flexor of the back leg.
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Old 11-25-2005, 09:11 AM   #8
Tom Brose
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Kenneth, I am not the Tom you were asking, but I agree with you. However, I think the "Santa Cruz" style swing involves more knee flexion. Both have their own purpose for me, although when working with kettlebells, I tend to do RKC swings, concentrating on the hamstrings. I just got an 88lb bell, and keep toes pointed straight ahead feet relatively narrow. hams ang glutes fried, everything else OK.
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