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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 08-05-2004, 04:01 PM   #1
Bhodi
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Can anyone help me with a really clear step by step explanation of Hindu Pushups and Squats.
I've read the descriptions on Matt Furey's site but without pictures I can't quite follow what he wants you to do.
I can see how these would be great exercises but don't want to embark on a major campagn without being sure of my technique.
Any help much appreciated.
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Old 08-05-2004, 04:53 PM   #2
Jason Carey
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bhodi -
here's a link with pictures:
http://www.cbass.com/Furey.htm
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Old 08-05-2004, 04:55 PM   #3
Jason Carey
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another with a video clip (pushups)
http://www.athletics.ucr.edu/strengt...ndupushups.htm

try a google search for "hindu pushups" and you'll get a lot of hits.
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Old 08-05-2004, 05:04 PM   #4
Jeremy Jones
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I do a version of the 'hindu squat' where you actually jump in the middle of the squat (when you are about 1/2 way up from the bottom). You land about a foot foward of where you started, then you immediately hop back as you complete the rest of the upward motion of the squat.

Is there a particular name for this? Now that I know it is not technically a 'hindu squat'
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Old 08-06-2004, 11:31 AM   #5
Bhodi
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Thanks guys,

I'm going to give it a go!

By the way does anyone have any experience of switching from a primarily weights based to bodyweight system such as that advocated by Furey?

Thanks again.

CrossFit rocks.
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Old 08-06-2004, 01:26 PM   #6
Phil Canto
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The athlete does squats essentially using toes only at the bottom? Thats a bit curious. What are the benefits of this movement and its functionality versus doing traditional squats?

PC
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Old 08-06-2004, 03:32 PM   #7
Craig Stovall
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I switched to primarily bodyweight exercises a few months back, and my grappling endurance went through the roof. In a sense, I'm in Furey's corner when he advocates the dominant use of bodyweight protocols for combat athletes. What difference does it make how strong you are if you are gassed after 30 seconds? I will say this, switching to bodyweight exercises doesn't do much for my physique. I tend to lean out and get a very smooth physique. So, I'm a terror on the mat, but I don't have those big muscles that look good at the beach...LOL!!! Oh well, everything in life's a trade-off. I still hit the weights for strength, but not very often.

As far as the Hindu Squats, I don't like them a whole lot, and I think you'll find that a lot of people on this board share that opinion. I like the flat foot form that you see being demonstrated on the vids and pics for this site. It allows one to play with the width of the stance and position of the feet a little bit more than Hindus, and therefore you can distribute the load to different muscle groups (thighs vs hams/glutes). Also, I could never get a great cadence going with the Hindus. I always felt the safety factor precluded me from going all out. With flat feet I can really go for speed and explosiveness without compromising my balance or risking a tweak to the knee. That way I can attend to explosive characteristics as well as endurance. Hindus are just too much of a slow grind (at least for me), and they tend to be a quad isolator. I'm like most folks here...I believe the "magic" is in the hams and glutes and the flat foot style seems to rely on those muscle groups to a great extent.
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Old 08-07-2004, 08:06 PM   #8
Mike Minium
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Well said, Craig.

The one objection I have to hindu squats is the one you've pointed out--that you're on your toes at the bottom of the squat.

By going down onto the toes, you limit the recruitment of the posterior chain (it's not totally eliminated, it's just not as strongly involved as when you drive through the heels at the bottom of the squat). It seems to me that athleticism is borne through the process of driving through the heels.

The Olympics are coming soon, and I think it's a great opportunity to see a number of heels in action. ;-)

Besides the obvious sport (at least here at CF), olympic lifting, there are a number of sporting events where the importance of heel drive is evident, at least upon closer inspection.

For example, watch the high jump (those freakishly tall, thin athletes wearing the funny-looking shorts). The last thing the high jumpers do before jumping is plant the heel of their lead leg, arch their back slightly, and then explode upward. All of this is initiated through the heel drive.

Or watch indoor volleyball. You'll see the blockers lean slightly forward, go into a half squat, and then explode upward. Again, all of this is initiated by driving up through one's heels.

The examples are endless. The explosive movements (especially jumping) are always initiated with a push through the heels.

Having said that, I agree that hindu squats are very good at developing strength endurance and cardiovascular fitness. However, one can achieve the same level of endurance and aerobic fitness through high-rep flat-footed squats, plus you get more athletic carryover (jumping and flat-footed squatting are very similar from a biomechanical point of view).

I'm not trying to discourage anyone from doing hindu squats--just offering a different viewpoint. For whatever it's worth.

Mike
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Old 08-08-2004, 04:02 PM   #9
Bohdi
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I've been working on it over the last few days and I'm up to doing 200 hindu squats unbroken though not particularly fast. I've got a few observations.
Mike is really correct in that rising off your heals takes out the posterior chain. Not a bad thing in itself if you know that and so other things to compensate.
I have found that the biggest effect on your quads is achieved if you make every possible effort to keep your knees from travelling forward. To do this you really have to use a lot of core strength and it is quite hard. You end up with something approaching an Olympic squat but up on your toes.
I read one article in which the author claimed his knees never travelled past his toes when doing hindus, and while I have not yet perfected the technique I would say that is highly unlikely. Anyway by keeping your weight well back you force a lot more effort into the downward phase.
I could not gather from anything I read what is the exact point at which you lower the heal down to the ground as you rise. Someone suggested that it is a gradual lowering as you rise but doing that I did not find the movement very satisfactory so I experimented with keeping myself on my toes until I reach the top of the movement and I can really say that doing it that way gives you a terrific calf workout.
At this point I still don't think I am getting the most out of it becasue I am still working on technique but I intend to persevere and will post my experiences here.
Furey recommends sets of 500 so I want at least to get to that piint before being judgemental.
I agree with mike that most if not all actions requiring a powerful push off need a heal to toe action. In that sense I think flat heal squats or single leg squats are going to be the weapon of choice.

I had a better time with Hindu pushups since I realise they are basically the same as Shaolin pushups which I do anyway. Definitely a great exercise for both increasing your strength and flexibility.

Reading as much of Matt Furey's stuff as I could find without paying makes me feel that he definitely has something but I feel his Royal Court approach is too focused and a good program needs more.

The reason I posted this enquiry is becasue I have been lifting weights for my whole life alongside doing gymnastics and martial arts but recently began to feel that while I have never had a serious injury, my super heavy approach was starting to take its toll on my joints. I want to be super strong of course but I also want to be supple and have a lot of power to move fast and under control. Hence my feeling that I want to move to a bodyweight approach.

I'm going to give it a try for 4 months and see how I feel at the end of it. Maybe try a few lfts to see how much strength I've gained or lost.

I'll keep posting to let you all know how it goes.

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