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Old 11-09-2005, 06:24 PM   #1
Charlie Reid
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I got in an argument with one of my professors about the literature not favoring intense exercise for children nor adults. He said that training skill-based fitness (i.e. ball skills) that was once used to prepare kids for war and cardiovascular activity at around 60-75% MHR was the best way for training kids and adults.

I informed him about the tabata protocol and how intense exercise increases VO2 Max (the measure that exercise physiologists consider the BEST measure of fitness...i disagree) better than less intense, yet longer bouts of cardiovascular exercise. He likened this "radical" study to the atkins and other fad diets and said that intense exercise utilizes the ATP/PCr system more and isn't the best for longevity overall health. Cardiovascular training that uses more oxygen is the best, according to him.


The literature shows the superiority of short bouts of intense exercise and yet we're still not advocating this for adult populations or children. Any speculations? Is it just the "scare" factor? My nutrition class even mentions that intense exercise should be avoid due to possible overtraining.

This might have been discussed and is really the premise for crossfit-type training, but i'm confused as to why intense exercise, even in the slightest amount, hasn't been adopted.
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Old 11-09-2005, 06:33 PM   #2
Matt Gagliardi
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My opinion? Because you're dealing with a group of people (university professors, exercise physiologists, etc.) that are invested in the status quo.

How'd you like to teach something for decades...only to be told it's wrong?

This is not a condition isolated to academia...it happens (and frequently) in the business world as well.

(Message edited by h2o_goalie on November 09, 2005)
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Old 11-09-2005, 06:52 PM   #3
Charlie Reid
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Which further surprises me because this is a young professor that is teaching the course and he just got his doctorate last year. He's a baseball scout and not a recreational marathoner like the rest of the professors here.
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Old 11-09-2005, 07:20 PM   #4
Beth Moscov
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That doesn't surprise me at all Charlie. Who were his teachers? What did they teach him? Obviously, the old paradigm.

More than that, no offense to Ph.D.s, the most ardent believer's in their own intellectual superiority are new Ph.D.s.

Give him a few years. If you want, get some more research stuff and instead of telling him you think he is wrong, ask what his interpretation of those studies are in terms of his position. It could be very interesting to hear what he says when offered a stack of research that is current and peer reviewed.
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Old 11-09-2005, 07:40 PM   #5
Ben Kaminski
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Ask him to work out with you for a week or two.
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Old 11-09-2005, 07:42 PM   #6
Lincoln Brigham
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Ben's got the right idea.
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Old 11-09-2005, 07:52 PM   #7
Charlie Reid
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Not a bad idea...he has an incredibly busy schedule, but i think it might only take one workout to convince him=)
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Old 11-09-2005, 08:03 PM   #8
Brad Williams
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The most solid evidence that supports Crossfit are the athletes that are going into the black box and coming out the other side.

Get him to try "Kelly" with you.
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Old 11-09-2005, 08:25 PM   #9
Eric Cimrhanzel
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Charlie,

I fully agree with Ben. I have never, ever, been able to convince someone the ability of CrossFit workouts to help improve fitness through words alone, whether they were my own or through some other research.

In this case, they have to DO to believe. Seeing is not nearly enough.

My vote is for Fran...
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Old 11-09-2005, 08:41 PM   #10
Russ Greene
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I second Fran. Kelly is good, but it looks hard on paper. Fran looks like, hmm I can do that easily, I'll just jump right in.
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