CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-16-2004, 06:06 PM   #1
Scott Parker
Member Scott Parker is offline
 
Scott Parker's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 489
i know i posted a similar thread around this time last year, but summer school and my EMT training kept me from doing it, but it looks like i will have some time this summer to actually hike the entire colorado trial, which is 470 miles, stretching from denver to durango.

i did half the trail solo back in 2002, but quit half way.

if i end up doing it this year (tentatively planning on doing it in about 4 weeks, beginning of july to august), i will be doing it in ultralight style. my base packweight is less than 10 lbs. (a lot of homemade gear!) that's everything minus food and water, which will be less than 20lbs. all said and done.

with that said the only obstacle that i seem to be having trouble with is food. that's definately the weak link.

i am looking for advice on food choices appropriate for the trail, and any adjustments / recommendations on supplementation, caloric requirements, carb, fat, & protein intake.

thank you all in advance for your input and advice. once i get this dialed i'll be ready!



scott
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2004, 08:18 PM   #2
Jason Lauer
Member Jason Lauer is offline
 
Jason Lauer's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2008
Location: York  PA
Posts: 158
I know this isn't what you were looking for, as it seems you have a great diet already from previous posts, but I remember reading Carlos Hathcock's book "98 Confirmed Kills" and they always took what they called John Wayne food. This consisted mostly of crackers with peanut butter.

Not much help, but a little humor. In my estimation nuts of various kinds would be great, small, light, high in calories and good fat. I'd think you would want to up the fat to stay energized, as you already seem to be lean I can't see why this would hurt. You may want to look in to some M.R.E.'s also. They may not have the best macronutrient profile, but they are light and aren't too bulky if your remove them from the box.

Maybe some dried fruit too, I know they have a higher GI, but they taste so damn good and don't weight much at all.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2004, 09:25 PM   #3
Paul "The Viking"
Departed Paul
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 46
Scott,

I'm completely jealous of you! I'd love to have the time off to do a hike like that. I was camping a couple of hours from Denver last fall and have also been hiking near Durango. Its beautiful out there - though I still like New Mexico the best!

Anyways, since its a longer trip, you have to worry about nutrition a bit more than you would on a weekend hike. I guess what I'd recommend are a good dose of the hiking staples: nuts, dried fruits, beef/turkey jerky. Ramen noodles, Lipton noodles, and instant oatmeal are also favorites of people. Those tuna pouches could supply some good protein as well, but they might stink to pack out. If you're trying to be a paleo die-hard, you could also try pemmican. I'd think that hard sausges like pepperoni would be easier. They keep well and have lots of fat and some protein in them.

Remember that you'll be losing a lot of salt while you sweat, too, so salty stuff is good, too (salted nuts, the ramen.) I think that its also wise to carry something sugery for those times when your blood sugar is dipping low and you need something fast. A lot of people bring candy bars or put M&Ms in their Gorp.

Remember, though, that you'll crave some variety on a 4 week hike, so don't plan on eating the same things every day! And taking a multivitamin couldn't hurt, either!

When are you planning on going?

-Paul
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 04:43 AM   #4
Scott Parker
Member Scott Parker is offline
 
Scott Parker's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 489
paul-

right now it looks like it will happen from july 2nd to august 13th.

i want to try and avoid the ramen, lipton noodles, and candy because the last time i attempted this hike (got to buena vista) i ate that way ate was starving all the time!

paleo would be nice, but not very practical for this trip, so i'll eat outsode the diet!

scott
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 05:26 AM   #5
Lynne Pitts
Administrator Lynne Pitts is offline
 
Lynne Pitts's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Richmond  NH
Posts: 3,232
Scott,
How about pemmican? It's paleo as can be (dried meat and beef fat, with traditionally some dried cranberries). Nutrient dense, portable, lasts forever without refrigeration. There are several recipes on the paleo sites; here is a site to get you started.

PS I am jealous! The hike sounds like a wonderful experience.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 05:47 AM   #6
Jay Edvardz
Departed Jay Edvardz is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 445
Scott,
I agree with Lynne. Pemmican would be an excellent choice.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 07:30 AM   #7
Scott Parker
Member Scott Parker is offline
 
Scott Parker's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 489
lynne-

thanks for the pemmican recipies. i'll try some of them out!

for those interested, check out: www.coloradotrail.org

so far i'm doing this solo, but would definataly like company!


scott
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 11:51 AM   #8
Paul "The Viking"
Departed Paul
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 46
Scott,

I've never been too big of a fan of the ramen type stuff either. I don't find it very filling and it takes up a lot of space. Generally, after a long day of backpacking, I'd have to eat 2 packs of ramen at a bare minimum. That ends up filling up your pack pretty quickly. The salt tends to taste good at the end of the day, though.

On the other hand, make sure you bring some carb foods with you. The dried fruit is a good start, but I'd suggest something else as well. Guess I don't have any creative suggestions about that. I usually bring some instant oatmeal to have at breakfast. Getting dense carb sources of unprocessed food is hard, I guess. Sweet potatoes, for example, would last quite a while, but take so long to cook (even chopped up and boiled) that you'd be burning lots of fuel. I guess, though, you can eat them raw.

As far as the candy goes - I suggest that only as a "backup" for those cases where you just desperately need to help your blood sugar - definitely not a staple. The dried fruit is very sweet, but is mostly fructose which has to be converted into glucose in your liver before you can use it, so its GI is not very high. Some Cliff bars and most candy would be higher.

Maybe its possible to go without the carbs, I don't know. It takes a week or two, though, to switch over into ketosis, so I'd suggest, if you decide to go that route, to switch before you leave.

Maybe you can get a revolving group of friends/crossfitters for company. I'd love to take a week off and do part of the hike with you, but I'm afraid I'm saving up my vacation days for my wedding/honeymoon in September!

-Paul
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 01:24 PM   #9
Scott Parker
Member Scott Parker is offline
 
Scott Parker's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 489
i think what i may do now is just make a bunch of fish, beef, and turkey jerkey, along with some pemmican for protein.

i can also cook and then dehydrate stuff like sweet potatoes and veggies. at night when i get to camp i just rehydrate with water, add olive oil, bring to a boil, and i have a mish mosh paleo dinner.

now i'm working on breakfast and lunch!

fuel really isn't an issue since i am using my homemade stove that is made out of two pepsi cans. it weihs less than an ounce, and burns denatured alcohol. usually 2-3 tablespoons of fuel to get 2 cups of water boiling. it's one of the ways i've managed to cut weight.

thinking about oatmeal for breakfast once in a while, but not instant. that stuff is garbage! i have used slow cook oats in the past. the key is to let them soak in water for a little while, and then cook them. they are a bit chewey, but still doable.

i just really want to see how much i can stay away from the prepackaged and preserved stuff!

thanks everyone! keep the suggestions coming!


scott
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2004, 04:29 PM   #10
Lynne Pitts
Administrator Lynne Pitts is offline
 
Lynne Pitts's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Richmond  NH
Posts: 3,232
Scott,
Could you soak your oats overnight, and then heat in the am? That way they're nice and edible.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Food for thought Mark Miller Community 2 04-24-2007 04:43 PM
Lowerback Hiking Workouts Kevin Burns Fitness 10 02-26-2007 06:33 AM
Hiking (with 45lb child) Jason Smith Testimonials 4 10-18-2006 07:16 AM
Food Allergies Frank Menendez Nutrition 28 05-24-2006 07:55 PM
Too many salads - not enough 'other food' Jesse Newman Nutrition 5 05-23-2006 07:25 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.