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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 01-15-2008, 08:32 AM   #1
Lisbeth Darsh
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Articles of Interests

As a cycling coach, I receive the "Performance Conditioning Cycling" newsletter and opened it up yesterday to find a short article entitled "High Intensity Interval Training Another Blow to Long Slow Distance Training (LSD)?" -- which referenced this research: http://www.gssiweb.com/Article_Detai...vel=2&topic=15 (WFS)

(The last line of the PCC article made me chuckle: "Bottom line -LSD is fun, HIT isn't - but there's always the time factor. Something to think about.")

Not sure if it was already posted here but I thought it might be of interest to some CFers. The site that hosts the report (not the report or the PCC newsletter) is sponsored by Gatorade, however, so keep that in mind when you read any of the recovery drink research. Still, some interesting studies listed on the site, including one of the older articles on rhabdo (1993?) but which is still relevant.
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Old 01-15-2008, 02:12 PM   #2
Susie Rosenberg
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Re: Articles of Interests

Thanks for sharing that.

It's interesting...the first year I did my 500 mile trek across New York (www.fanyride.com wfs) I actually only got my road bike in May, and did the ride in July. It was a wet and cold spring, and if I got out on my bike a dozen times, it was a lot. Yet I managed to crank out those 500 miles, and I know that it's because I was doing a pretty high-intensity spin class 60 min three times a week.

I held up pretty well for someone who really didn't train long distances!

Susie
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Old 01-15-2008, 02:22 PM   #3
Gorm Laursen
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Re: Articles of Interests

LSD is fun and HIT boring??? What's cooking in the mind's of people who make statements like that?

Well, currently I'm training for a marathon and I simply find LSD BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOORIIING!!!! Everything that has a high intensity aspect is FUN! Therefore my program consists mainly of 200-1600 meter runs and or tabata style workouts, besides CF. Only one LSD session per week. Can't stand the monotomy.

Anyhow, thanks for the link
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Old 01-15-2008, 02:48 PM   #4
Jon DeJong
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Re: Articles of Interests

I don't know if actually implied that HIT was boring. They just said it wasn't fun. I'm guessing that's because of the difficulty level.

I too am training for a marathon. I've been a runner for years, and only recently have begun transitioning my strength routine from a more traditional one to a more functional training one. Personally, I like the LSDs (up to a point). I get to get out and see so much, clear my head, listen to new music, etc. etc.
But I also like my FT. It's great to have all these new challenges.

The combination of the two has worked great for me. Switching to FT has has allowed me up my running to prepare for the marathon, while actually gaining strength. My arms have never looked better, and I haven't done a bicep curl or tricep extension in a couple of months... love it

But I think I've ventured pretty far off topic. The point is, what's fun is what you like. And if you like running and biking for long periods of time, the HIT can be pretty hard and probably. not "fun". But not necessarily boring.
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Old 01-15-2008, 02:52 PM   #5
Colm O'Reilly
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Re: Articles of Interests

What a hilarious statement from a magazine with Performance in the title.
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Old 01-16-2008, 05:54 AM   #6
Lisbeth Darsh
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Re: Articles of Interests

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon DeJong View Post
I don't know if actually implied that HIT was boring. They just said it wasn't fun. I'm guessing that's because of the difficulty level.

I too am training for a marathon. I've been a runner for years, and only recently have begun transitioning my strength routine from a more traditional one to a more functional training one. Personally, I like the LSDs (up to a point). I get to get out and see so much, clear my head, listen to new music, etc. etc.
But I also like my FT. It's great to have all these new challenges.

The combination of the two has worked great for me. Switching to FT has has allowed me up my running to prepare for the marathon, while actually gaining strength. My arms have never looked better, and I haven't done a bicep curl or tricep extension in a couple of months... love it

But I think I've ventured pretty far off topic. The point is, what's fun is what you like. And if you like running and biking for long periods of time, the HIT can be pretty hard and probably. not "fun". But not necessarily boring.
I agree. LSD can be enjoyable sometimes. (Although I do enjoy LSD cycling much more than LSD running.) I love to CF and understand its correlation to improved performance on the bike, but there are some Sundays that I don't look to burn up the road -- if my neighbor wants to ride 20, 30, or 40 miles and have breakfast in a little town up the road, I'm happy to oblige. (Then again, maybe it's just my age showing -- or my neighbor's influence. The first time he suggested the breakfast thing, I was shocked -- I had never done anything but hammered on the bike. I still draw the line at breakfast, however, no beers and biking for me, not on my bike.) But I guess the difference is that I'm not looking for "performance" on those days, I'm just having fun.
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Old 01-16-2008, 06:27 AM   #7
Cal Jones
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Re: Articles of Interests

I must say I enjoy a long run outdoors (by long I mean 3-6 miles - any longer than that is boring and bad for my knees) on my local common (trees, squirrels, sometimes a woodpecker or heron to look at) infinitely more than intervals on a treadmill or track.
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Old 01-16-2008, 08:28 AM   #8
Steve Liberati
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Re: Articles of Interests

Doing today's workout (Run or row 5K) was not fun at all. I felt like a clumsy, oversized bear running down the street as I made the final stretch. Not the most graceful runner, I always found running to be very forced and unnatural to me. Sure my technique was completely out of whack too. In fact, the same thing occurs in all my LSD aerobic endeavors whether its cycling, swimming, etc. My point here is I think there is a strong correlation b/t how good you are at something and how fun it is. If I was better at cycling, I'm sure I would find it much more enjoyable. Sure the cyclists can say the same thing about CRossFit. If you're good at CrossFit, you tend to enjoy it much more, regardless of whether its the most effective program for elite fitness or not.
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Old 01-16-2008, 09:26 AM   #9
Lisbeth Darsh
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Re: Articles of Interests

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Liberati View Post
My point here is I think there is a strong correlation b/t how good you are at something and how fun it is. If I was better at cycling, I'm sure I would find it much more enjoyable. Sure the cyclists can say the same thing about CRossFit. If you're good at CrossFit, you tend to enjoy it much more, regardless of whether its the most effective program for elite fitness or not.
True -- which is why we find that expert performers in almost any category (fitness, business, academia, etc.) seem to have a strong love for what they do. The interesting cases, I find, are not the people who love something and perform poorly at it, but the people who don't love something and excel at it anyhow (the Williams sisters in tennis come to mind -- Serena to a greater extent than Venus, possibly) -- how they mentally force themselves to excel at something they don't love. Is that extreme discipline or folly?
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Old 01-16-2008, 10:10 AM   #10
Laurent Frat
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Re: Articles of Interests

Thanks for sharing the article. I am very interested in this subject.

I felt the heart of the article was in this passage:
Short-term HIT Rapidly Improves Exercise Capacity

From a practical perspective, one of the most striking findings from our recent studies was the dramatic improvement in exercise performance during tasks that rely mainly on aerobic energy metabolism, despite the very low training volume (Burgomaster et al., 2005; 2006; 2007; Gibala et al., 2006). In our initial study (Burgomaster et al., 2005), subjects doubled the length of time that exercise could be maintained at a fixed submaximal workload — from ~26 min to 51 min during cycling at 80% of pre-training VO2peak —after only six HIT sessions (Figure 3). The validity of this finding was bolstered by the fact that a control group showed no change in performance when tested two weeks apart with no training intervention. Subsequent work confirmed that two weeks of HIT improved performance during tasks that more closely resemble normal athletic competition including laboratory time trials that simulated cycling races lasting from ~2 min to ~1 h (Burgomaster et al., 2006; 2007; Gibala et al., 2006).
Obviously, the factors responsible for training-induced improvements in exercise capacity are complex and are determined by numerous physiological (e.g., cardiovascular, ionic, metabolic, neural, respiratory) and psychological attributes (e.g., mood, motivation, perception of effort). We have found no measurable change in VO2peak after two weeks of Wingate-based HIT (Burgomaster et al., 2005; 2006; 2007; Gibala et al., 2006), which suggests the improved exercise performance was related in part to peripheral adaptations in skeletal muscle as described above. Other investigators have reported an increased VO2peak after as little as two weeks of HIT (Rodas et al., 2001; Talanian et al., 2007), but the total work performed in those studies was considerably greater than in our investigations.
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