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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 04-09-2006, 05:06 AM   #1
Patrick Schoudt jr
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Morning
Is there a certain level of base strength one would recomend having as far as lifting is concerned. What I mean is should I concentrate or add in a powerlifing day with the cf workouts. Just to get my bench/dead/squat strength up. Will this make me more proficient at the workouts. I do cf for fun and bc I do bjj. I just realize how weak I am looking at The Linda. Thanks in advance
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Old 04-09-2006, 05:43 AM   #2
Craig Van De Walker
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Like everything in life "it depends"

If you are starting out and are currently out of shape and weak!

Work up to doing the WOD as written over a period of time everything will change. You will get stronger!

If you want to emphasize strength increases you can add more days/workouts of squats, deads, bench press, overhead press etc. You can do this either instead of one of the WOD each week or prior to the WOD depending on your fitness level.

Heck you could do Linda once every two weeks as one of your workouts (scaling weights to your ability of course) that would be uhm "fun"

It's up to you but I would suggest.
1- eating well, zone or something similar
2- work up to WOD as written and do them for 6mo to a year and re-assess.
3- Subscribe to Crossfit journal and buy some of the back issues, educate yourself, I would be really surprised if you were disapointed
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Old 04-09-2006, 10:07 AM   #3
Robert Wolf
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Patrick-

Virtually all athletic characteristics, power, reaction time, strength endurance are predicated upon absolute strength. The analogy is that one can not shoot a cannon from a canoe and similarly one will have a limited run of success with metabolic conditioning unless one is "strong".

What constitutes strong? A nice place to start is do you (males) have an EASY 2x BW DL? 75-100% bw standing press? 75% of BW weighted pull-up?

The numbers are a bit arbitrary but I think you get the idea. If one wants to excell in this strength/endurance realm a significant strength base MUST be built.
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Old 04-09-2006, 12:23 PM   #4
Johan Nederhof
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Robert, can you follow up on this?

"What constitutes strong? A nice place to start is do you (males) have an EASY 2x BW DL? 75-100% bw standing press? 75% of BW weighted pull-up?

The numbers are a bit arbitrary but I think you get the idea."

Where do you get these numbers? I think they are a nice aim.

Johan
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Old 04-09-2006, 12:26 PM   #5
Lynne Pitts
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Moving to Fitness...
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Old 04-09-2006, 02:04 PM   #6
Paul Theodorescu
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I have definitely noticed maximal strength helping out with strength endurance.

When my press goes up, doing sots presses for high reps in a metabolic workout is a lot easier.

However, this is only true to a certain point. All the sprinting in the world isn't doing anything for my jogging times beyond 400m.
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Old 04-09-2006, 02:09 PM   #7
Robert Wolf
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Johan-
Just some things I've observed and stole from other people. Dave werner at CF North has given this topic MUCH more thought than I...perhaps he will chime in here.
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Old 04-09-2006, 02:26 PM   #8
Russ Greene
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My personal experience has confirmed what Rob said.

I concentrated on strength endurance in the fall, mostly because my training was limited to dumbbells. I did lots of thrusters, running, rowing, one arm snatches, and swings. I brought my Fran down to 4:20 with 40 lb. db's, and did 21 thrusters with 50 lb. db's, totaling well over half my bodyweight at 170 lbs.

However, when I started lifting heavy again I was very displeased. I missed a deadlift at 345 that should have been easy, and developed an annoying habit of letting my right knee turn in on squats and deadlifts. I tried back squating only 205 and it felt heavy, and I only managed s few reps! I realized that light weights let me get away with bad habits that manifested themselves with heavy weights. Since then I've bought a membership to a gym with barbells, and have been training heavy with a friend who is much stronger than me, combined with equal amounts of swimming and crossfit-style metabolic conditioning workouts. I am very happy with my gains and am noticing that my strength endurance has improved even though I'm training it much less. The final test will be when I test my max deadlift at the TSC in May.

P.S. You can see my workout log in the WOD section.
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Old 04-09-2006, 02:34 PM   #9
Russ Greene
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I forgot to add that it depends on who you are. Tom Brose at Crossfit DC is the exact opposite of me. He puts on muscle and strength very easily, whereas I have a fairly slim build in comparison and am much more of a slow-twitch guy by nature. Thus he focuses on strength-endurance and metabolic conditioning, and I focus on max strength and power, even though we're aiming at the same ideal Crossfit combination of well-developed power and endurance at the same time.

Also, I find this emphasis on max strength a refreshing departure from what I used to read about athletic training before Crossfit. It focused on building an "aerobic base" for every sport. It makes me wonder why no one ever checked out the Cross Country kids, who have the best aerobic bases, but tend to do awfully at every other sport, and realized that this model was inaccurate.

(Message edited by sinai16 on April 09, 2006)
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Old 04-09-2006, 03:27 PM   #10
Chris Forbis
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Johan-

A benchmark link that I find useful.
http://home.comcast.net/%7Ejoandbryce/hwgdami.htm
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