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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 05-07-2006, 08:19 AM   #1
Erik Preston
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When working towards one rep max, where does one reach the no/go failure point, where form will suffer and worse, injury could creep in? I guess my question is that with DL's one can't be as cavalier as with other max effort lifts--in trying to power through a failure point, because the consequences could be life changing, in the wrong way. When do you decide to dump? What are the form cues?

It's hard with no video to submit, but doing WOD today, I found that my lower back was coming into play more than it should or normally does on DL's...Does this happen to anyone?
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Old 05-07-2006, 08:24 AM   #2
Patrick O'Neil
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I just posted almost the same question at almost the same time! I'll be watching yours and mine; I'm doing the same thing with the lower back. I am able to move the weight, and I only use my back briefly until my legs "catch up" but I just feel like this is probably wrong. Hoping some strongman will straighten me out.
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Old 05-07-2006, 08:28 AM   #3
Jesse Woody
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If your back begins to leave its neutral lumbar curve at any time, that is when you stop. Patrick, from your description, are you lifting with your back, as in flexing your spine? Or is it instead a movement initiated at your hips? That wasn't totally clear from your post, but as long as you retain the neutral spine position and are hinging from your hips (thus bringing your glutes, hamstrings and hip extensors into the lift) then it's probably OK.
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Old 05-07-2006, 08:41 AM   #4
Erik Preston
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Patrick, you phrased it well. You describe what I am feeling. I have perfect form up to max effort, bar close to shins (actually bar burns, that's how close, not moving the bar around the knees...etc.) followed by a powerful hip thrust once the bar is over my knees.

Jesse, on the progressive efforts towards ME, I notice not a distinct rounding of the back, but just a tinge of wanting to raise my torso at a faster rate than my leg extension...I got the weight up, with no painful repercussions... Are you saying this is an indicator to stop? Thx--E
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Old 05-07-2006, 10:33 AM   #5
Jesse Woody
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From what I understand, this isn't bad as in dangerous form, but rather, possibly not the most efficient way to perform the movement, which might hold you back at the higher weights. As long as you're keeping your back in a neutral position and bracing with your abs/spinal erectors, you should be fine, but it sounds like you're starting out with a semi-romanian deadlift-type movement, which might prevent further gains when you really start trying to bump the weight up.
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Old 05-07-2006, 10:52 AM   #6
bill fox
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Jesse is right. Watch 50 500+lb conventional DLers and most will start with the back. It's only dangerous if you lose your "structure".

But Eric is right also, 1 bad DL and you're screwed. Work slowly, warm up alot, and don't compete even with you're last time. DL seems to be very day to day. If it feels hinky don't go too high.

Bill
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Old 05-07-2006, 05:01 PM   #7
Jerry Hill
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Great Deadlifts are pulled with no doubt. There is no room for anything to creep in but the foregone conclusion that the lift will be made.

Perfect form with submaximal effort is a great building block...check PRILEPHIN'S TABLE it will do you right.
http://www.angelfire.com/pe/txpls/prilephin.html

Good luck,
Jerry
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Old 05-07-2006, 05:31 PM   #8
Erik Preston
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Good points all--Sage advice that I'll follow next DL workout. Thanks Crossfit Brothers.
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Old 05-07-2006, 06:14 PM   #9
Adrian Bozman
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Just wanted to add that I think it's an invaluable skill to learn how to fail at the deadlift without hurting one's back. This happens all the time in 'real life'...nearly all of us have had an experience attempting to pick something up that was heavier than we thought. If you fail correctly, it shouldn't be a problem. It's been my experience that a proper addressing of the bar or implement is crucial. Think big breath, back straight and really brace all your muscles for the load before you're under it. If you wait until the lift starts, it's too late. If the weight is too heavy and you fail, it shouldn't look much different than a near-isometric version of the set-up, IMO.

Getting yourself in this habit regardless of what you are intending to lift (or how much) is a back-saving skill.
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Old 05-08-2006, 10:40 AM   #10
Mike Minium
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Nice post, Adrian.

Mike

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