CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > Community > Pukie's Bucket
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Pukie's Bucket Bogus threads, trolls, and other malarkey

 
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-27-2011, 06:42 AM   #51
Jamie Gowens
Member Jamie Gowens is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Arlington  TX
Posts: 537
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Of course CrossFitters care about aesthetics. We're not spending $50 a pair on Lululemon shorts and $100 for a pair of pants because they truly increase athletic performance (barring compression attire, and even then, people debate the efficacy). We're not scouring the interwebz for the most awesomely rad looking knee socks because they contribute anything to the WOD. We're not looking for the strappiest but still most supportive sports bras because they increase our range of motion. We certainly don't have a website bookmarked featuring daily CrossFit 'outfits' color coordinated and put together because purple vs yellow Inov8s actually DO anything for us.
We do it because the shorts hit at the best part of our legs and the pants make our *** look amazing. Strappy and deep V bras are sexy. Knee socks...well...CrossFit females have certainly done their part to make them slutty.
CrossFitters don't strip their shirts off at the first opportunity regardless of ambient temperature because being shirtless immediately increases ability (though wearing a shirt while working out is annoying, it's certainly not performance related).

Of COURSE CrossFit is about aesthetics for the general population. Most members know they're not going to be upper level elite competitors, they just want to look better naked, plain and simple.


Regarding Gillian's article, the criticisms levied are generally fair, and I agree that she was facing poor coaching and nutritional advice.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:07 AM   #52
Jim Denofa
Affiliate Jim Denofa is offline
 
Jim Denofa's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Lawton  OK
Posts: 475
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Z. Smith View Post
From Glassman in 2006 (in Evidence Based Fitness, CF Journal 53 1/2007)

"Not all form faults are dangerous. Most clearly are not. Most increase the metabolic costs of an exercise or workout, i.e. reduce efficiency, and are not only acceptable but beneficial to conditioning. But what is certain is that only by working to exhaustion, where form faults are ineluctable, will we push the margins of power output where form falters. We push to the point of exhaustion and form breakdown to 1) increase/improve the safety of high output max efforts, and 2) maximize work capacity. How simple is that?"

Justin
I was waiting for this one. I am also waiting for the one with the shot group scenario by Dave Castro. Yeah guys your form is not going to be as good on your 30th rep of Grace as it is on your first. Big surprise!!! Coaches point is in the first 2 sentences of this paragraph. As long as your form faults don't stray to the area of being dangerous then the intensity is high and risk of injury is still low. That is the point of high intensity exercise.
__________________
www.crossfithavoc.com
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:09 AM   #53
Jamie Gowens
Member Jamie Gowens is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Arlington  TX
Posts: 537
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Denofa View Post
As long as your form faults don't stray to the area of being dangerous then the intensity is high and risk of injury is still low. That is the point of high intensity exercise.
How do you determine what's 'dangerous'?
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:14 AM   #54
Andrew Bell
Member Andrew Bell is offline
 
Andrew Bell's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Houston  TX
Posts: 4,021
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Lantz View Post
Here's a post from Gillian Mounsey on the SS forum, seems reasonable to me.

I found that the culture of CrossFit celebrated those with extremely low BF as our American culture does. Like any community, CrossFit is a cross section of our culture - our media celebrates low BF and lean physiques, so did the CrossFit community. I fell victim to this.
True, but if you look back at that time you had chicks like Annie, Eva and Nicole who are all built like brick (poo) houses. Sure they were low fat but more muscles than most of the dudes back then even. I think she had some bad influences, period.

Then again how many times have we heard those influences say that Matt Chan, and Robb Orlando will NEVER win the games cause they are just "too big"? Matt can clean and jerk somewhere in the neighboorhood of 325+lb. A male weighing in at 190+ is a cf "no-no" because of all the gymnastics according to most. Dave Lipson lost 20-30lbs to compete this year and still didn't make the cut.
__________________
| Log (wfs) |
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:21 AM   #55
Andrew Bell
Member Andrew Bell is offline
 
Andrew Bell's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Houston  TX
Posts: 4,021
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Denofa View Post
Coaches point is in the first 2 sentences of this paragraph. As long as your form faults don't stray to the area of being dangerous then the intensity is high and risk of injury is still low. That is the point of high intensity exercise.
But that debate could go on for hours. Form is there to help ensure that injury doesn't occur so any deviation from it is potentially dangerous.

.... then again:

"If you find the notion of falling off the rings and breaking your neck so foreign to you, then we don't want you in our ranks."

Nothing like 30 Muscle Up's for time to encourage a little bad form right?
__________________
| Log (wfs) |
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:29 AM   #56
Shane Skowron
Member Shane Skowron is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Queens  NY
Posts: 3,800
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Denofa View Post
I was waiting for this one. I am also waiting for the one with the shot group scenario by Dave Castro. Yeah guys your form is not going to be as good on your 30th rep of Grace as it is on your first. Big surprise!!! Coaches point is in the first 2 sentences of this paragraph. As long as your form faults don't stray to the area of being dangerous then the intensity is high and risk of injury is still low. That is the point of high intensity exercise.
Jim, it's hard to deny that many of the videos and pictures posted on the website (the main source of Crossfit information for thousands) demonstrate and/or celebrate poor form.

One of the more egregious videos I can recall is the one of the Crossfit Director of Training hitching a deadlift for 24 seconds with a rounded back. This wasn't the result of natural breakdown in a metcon, it was rep #3. Not sure if that's what you mean by "shot group scenario."


Also, I feel the need to ask this question. I can understand how it's natural for form to breakdown slightly during high intensity exercise. But why is it necessary for everything to be so intense that it results in this breakdown?


It seems to me, at least, that most the greatest athletes of all time have pretty admirable form or technique but that they're not going at full intensity on a daily basis. Just go ahead and take a look at someone like Liao Hui setting world 69kg C&J record, or David Rushida setting world 800m record, or Michael Phelps winning 8 gold medals in swimming, or Usain Bolt setting records at the 100m and 200m. These athletes are clearly going at the limits of their performance (after all, they're world best performances) and it's not like their form is breaking down in any significant way.

These athletes aren't training at 100% intensity at every single session. They're honing their technique and including planned variations in intensity to help them become the very best.

Not sure why going at full intensity all the time with a "ineluctable" breakdown in form is somehow superior.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:31 AM   #57
Aushion Chatman
Affiliate Aushion Chatman is offline
 
Aushion Chatman's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 3,342
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Gowens View Post
How do you determine what's 'dangerous'?
Jamie, to be fair, I think you should answer that too...

This argument is tired and has been hashed out on these boards (and other boards) for as long as I can remember.

The faults in form apparent in most any CF video on youtube brings tons of criticism from everyone, including me...

People don't like to hear that, "I just know gross form faults when I see it." But that is the case for me. There is some form fault I'll let folks get away with, because if you are doing something for time, it happens, BUT I will explain/yell where they are falling short during a WOD, and talk about it after a WOD, here's what you need to work on kind of stuff. There are other form faults where I stop the client immediately, reduce weight, or make them change movements all together.

These really bad errors are usually seen BEFORE the WOD starts during warm-ups and skill work, where the weight is light, every once in a while a person simply doesn't have the experience with a movement that I thought they did, and it has to happen during a WOD.
__________________
My Youtube Channel
CFSD Yelp
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:31 AM   #58
Jim Denofa
Affiliate Jim Denofa is offline
 
Jim Denofa's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Lawton  OK
Posts: 475
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Gowens View Post
How do you determine what's 'dangerous'?
How do you? If you are doing high intensity clean and jerks you are probably goiing to press out some jerks. You own an affiliate, you know that not all of your atheletes do the workouts with 100% ideal technique. You probably use your judgement to determine when to dial people back or let them finish etc. If you do CrossFit with any type of intensity(I'm guessing you do) you know that your own technique has a tendency to break down as well. I am also guessing that you have never experienced any serious injuries as a result?
__________________
www.crossfithavoc.com
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:41 AM   #59
Justin Z. Smith
Member Justin Z. Smith is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Alexandria  VA
Posts: 390
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Denofa View Post
I was waiting for this one. I am also waiting for the one with the shot group scenario by Dave Castro. Yeah guys your form is not going to be as good on your 30th rep of Grace as it is on your first. Big surprise!!! Coaches point is in the first 2 sentences of this paragraph. As long as your form faults don't stray to the area of being dangerous then the intensity is high and risk of injury is still low. That is the point of high intensity exercise.
For discussion, let's pretend we do bicep curls. There are two scenarios considered "high intensity" (although with different definitions of this term):

a) 200 reps of 20lb dumbbell for time.

b) 60lb dumbbell curled slowly until temporary muscle failure, failing on the positive part of the lift. Might take say 1 minute total time.

Form could break down in a) and in b). Do you consider a) or b) better overall?

Justin
 
Old 07-27-2011, 07:59 AM   #60
Eric Montgomery
Member Eric Montgomery is offline
 
Eric Montgomery's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 7,413
Re: Gillian Mounsey Article

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan Jackson View Post
I don't do it.

Let me get this straight though. You feel like you're smart enough, so you're obviously not sure. I guess that means that you might not know, so you're having to rely on guessing. So that means that whatever you choose to do might not be a particularly good choice for your goals, and you're basically just going at it blind without actually understanding what you're doing. Good job.

It's really beside the point though...Jim's comment was, paraphrased: people don't realize there's more to CrossFit than they have contact with, which is the main site and their local box.

The point is, the main site and the local box IS their reality. So if those two suck, then CrossFit sucks for them, and they don't have the knowledge to do it HOW THEY WANT.


No help. If you haven't figured it out by now, you probably aren't smart enough to pick and choose good workouts.
What? Nothing in that post makes sense. You don't know a thing about my training knowledge, background, or program, so nice job making assumptions about me "going at it blind" and not understanding the hows or whys of what I'm doing.

I'm pretty sure I do have it figured out--it's clear you're a troll, I was just trying to get you to admit it. Good luck with those abs.
 
 


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gillian Mounsey Justin Z. Smith Pukie's Bucket 20 07-25-2011 08:55 PM
Article on Vitamin D Wayne Riddle Nutrition 3 08-21-2009 01:59 AM
My First Article Chris Drewry Community 3 05-11-2008 02:02 AM
Handstand Article John McCracken Exercises 4 12-28-2005 08:25 AM
I liked this article Barry Cooper Nutrition 1 11-17-2003 03:28 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.