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Old 04-14-2006, 08:17 PM   #1
Kenneth R Davis
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Is nutrition requirements the same for high intensity resistance training, e.g. "Linda" as high intensity endurance training, e.g. 10+Km at > 60% VO2-Max. I am interested in finding well-conducted studies of high carb vs high fat diets on high intensity resistance training. Thanks
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Old 04-16-2006, 09:01 AM   #2
Greg Battaglia
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Studies have shown that when test subjects on low carb/highfat vs. subjects on high carb were placed on a high intensity routine (80% VO2 max) the subjects on the high carb diet showed much better performance. In other studies on low carb/ high carb that dealt with long slow endurance training the outcome showed that the low carb subjects had better performance. Considering that Crossfit is mostly high intensity training it is generally known that some carbs are neccessary for optimal performance.
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Old 04-16-2006, 07:32 PM   #3
Kenneth R Davis
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Greg,
I'm aware of one study which illustrates your point (Heldge: Interatction of training and diet on metabolism and endurance during exercise in man. J physiol 1996:493:293.) However, I'm trying to find evidence that a high fat diet can provide at least the same advantage as a high carb diet for resistnace training.

I know that athletes will adapt to a high fat diet and can use fat much like glycogen, but fat will not totally replace glycogen as the primary source of energy during intense exercise.

The Problem I'm facing is demonstrating that a high fat diet is at least equal or even superior to the traditional high carb athletic diet for resistance training i.e.CrossFit. I just read a paper( Pendergast. The Role of Dietary Fat on Performance, metabolish, and Health. Amer. J. Sports Med 1996, 24:s-53) which showed in endurance athletes, a high fat diet can improve endurance perfornce. But, I don't know if this applies to high-intensity resistance training, since a different muscle type is used.

My personal belief is that a high carb diet would be beneficial to the CrossFit workout, but the breath and deapth of the passionate disagreement I get from people involved in CrossFit has me questioning my belief. I'm looking for evidence to support the CrossFit point-of-view
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Old 04-17-2006, 09:15 AM   #4
Greg Battaglia
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I can't help you there. There isn't much science dealing with this debate. People sort of just accept that carbs are better for everything without actually trying out being a fat burner. All of the studies done on low carb vs high carb were pretty sort term and likely didn't allow for complete fat adaptation in test subjects. This undoubtedly results in faulty test results. I personally have found that being fat adapted improves performance across the board. I'd say I average at about 50-100 grams of carbs a day depending on how my appetite feels. An interesting fact is that 60% of all protein consumed on a low carb diet is converted to glucose via gluconeogenesis. With this in mind, I have absolutely no problem believing that as long as adequate protein is consumed glycogen stores can be easily filled without eating many carbs. I think that by consuming a low carb diet with lots of protein and good animal fat and about 60 grams of carbs a day you can get all the glycogen you need for Crossfit endeavors. The logic of the Crossfit point-of-view is that one can burn fat for most normal activities but still have adequate glycogen for met-con workouts via the Zone/Paleo diet.
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Old 04-17-2006, 10:28 AM   #5
Ross Hunt
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Kenneth,

Consider that in the realm of carbohydrate intake, there is a huge, unstudied gray area in between the USDA diet and the Atkins diet. This is where the Zone sits. In a course of a day on strict Zone, I often ate:

3 oranges
3 apples
1 banana
over 3 cups of peas (if I ate broccoli instead it would be something like almost 7 cups of broccoli)

This is a long way from a pre-marathon carb-load, but it's also a long way from a diet consisting entirely of pork rinds and heavy cream. Things often ignored by high-carb advocates include the benefit of getting a lot of your kcals in the form of healthy fat (testosterone elevation) and the fact that getting a lot of your calories in this form allows you to eat really high-quality carbs--veggies and fruit.
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