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Old 06-14-2013, 12:26 AM   #1
Alessandro Riente
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Supplements

Hello everybody, I'm a newbie in the crossfit world and for this reason I wuold like some suggestions about supplements.

I'm 23, 170 cm, 70 kg and I train 6/7 times a week, do you think supplements are necessary? If yes could you please tell me what I should take and mostly WHY?
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:05 AM   #2
Thomas Mitchell
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Re: Supplements

Protein- muscle development
BCAA recovery- recover after intense crossfit workouts
Creatine- All around strength
Fish oil- all around good for the body especially heart

Look into crossfit articles
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:20 AM   #3
jeramy park
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Re: Supplements

Do you have a problem with eating food or unable to meet your daily macro/micro requirements? If so you may need supplements. If not, it shouldnt be necessary.
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:33 AM   #4
Jeff Enge
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Re: Supplements

It would be irresponsible to recommend supplements with so little information to go by.

What does your diet look like? If you get enough protein in your food, theres no reason to take whey. If you dont have some kind of fasting diet, you should be able to get enough BCAAs from a good whey supplement and not need an extra BCAA product.

What are your workout goals? If getting stronger isnt one of your main goals than spending the money on creatine and/or beta alanine is probably unneccessary.

Fish oil, however, is a pretty good general purpose supplement.
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:44 AM   #5
Alessandro Riente
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Re: Supplements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Mitchell View Post
Protein- muscle development
BCAA recovery- recover after intense crossfit workouts
Creatine- All around strength
Fish oil- all around good for the body especially heart

Look into crossfit articles
in my first message I've written to explain me why I should take them. I cannot take some supplements without any explanation
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:45 AM   #6
Alessandro Riente
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Re: Supplements

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Originally Posted by jeramy park View Post
Do you have a problem with eating food or unable to meet your daily macro/micro requirements? If so you may need supplements. If not, it shouldnt be necessary.
No, I don't have any problem but I assume the supplements could help me to have an healty nutrition
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:56 AM   #7
Alessandro Riente
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Re: Supplements

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Originally Posted by Jeff Enge View Post
It would be irresponsible to recommend supplements with so little information to go by.

What does your diet look like? If you get enough protein in your food, theres no reason to take whey. If you dont have some kind of fasting diet, you should be able to get enough BCAAs from a good whey supplement and not need an extra BCAA product.

What are your workout goals? If getting stronger isnt one of your main goals than spending the money on creatine and/or beta alanine is probably unneccessary.

Fish oil, however, is a pretty good general purpose supplement.
Breakfast: 4 eggs, 2 pieces of bread, 1 glass of milk, 1 espresso (sigle or double)

Middle morning: 1 light yougurt (around 5 g of proteins)

Lunch: 80 g of pasta with tuna and a bit of oil, meat or fish in large quantity (usually between 200/300 g of breaded fried chicken but with the minum quantity possible of oil to cook it, just to don't attack it to the pan), some vegetables, some seasonal fruit

Middle afternoon: 100 g of bresaola (37 g of proteins) or spek (30 g of proteins) or ham

Dinner: like the lunch but without the pasta

Before sleeping: some light cheese

My goal is to reach the regionals between 1 or 3 years. Also I'd like to workout everyday (if it make sense) and in maximum 2 months I'd like to workout 2 times per day for 5 days per week and 1 per day for the other 2 days per week (if it makes sense as well)
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:40 AM   #8
Bill M. Hesse
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Re: Supplements

Adding more just because isn't exactly a great plan. Two a days might make sense if you are periodizing and trying to peak right before competition. In terms of diet, you will have to start eating more as you work out more. The first list you got isn't too bad. Lets look at the list in depth more though, as you request:

1. Protein- This is over-rated largely. One of our members who sells this agrees that most people think they need too much. ASCM recommends 0.8g/kg-1.6g/kg of body weight depending on your activity levels. 0.8g/kg is an average person and 1.2-1.6g/kg would be strength and endurance athletes. Largely I use protein supplements during times of hard training and easy preperation. I.e. it is easy to mix 3 cups of milk and a scoop after a workout and drink it while getting ready for school.

2. BCAAs- Branched Chain Amino Acids are used by many to promote favorable protein synthesis in a fasting state and some take it post workout for reasons I am not totally sold on. If you are eating enough protein, you are eating enough BCAA's. They are in the food you eat so I think their point is moot. However, they are in much greater concentration in supplement form. You would struggle to eat the amount in which people take it. I am not aware of the research that supports it over adequate protein intake. Someone might be able to chime in with that.

3. Creatine- Probably the best researched and proven supplement for ergogenics. I would go out on a limb and say the only one really worth its cost and fortunately for you it can be had cheaply. Creatine functions to increase the intra-cellular energy stores needed for high intensity actions such as weight lifting, sprints, etc. It has not proven to be useful for longer duration activity like some metcons are, but there is some research that indicates it improves the final "push" at the end of a long event. A product well worth the money. I have not noticed it effects in myself personally, but the research is there for this product.

4. Fish oil- Taken by many to reduce inflammation and improve cardiovascular health. Taken in amounts of 3g+ it has shown in studies to lower triglycerides and raise HDL cholesterol. At doeses many need, it may raise LDL slightly as well. At 6g or more it has shown to be quite effective at reducing acute inflammation. Some people take entirely too much fish oil. 3-4g daily is probably beneficial but you will likely not notice any type of direct effect in your training unless you are very deficient in your intake of omega-3 fatty acids. your tuna has 900mg per serving and sardines contain 1.3g. Salmon and others also are high in omega-3. I would find a list online of fish content and choose the ones you like best.

HMB and Beta-alanine are also popular but I am less familiar with their actions. Chris Mason may chime in and give you the skinny on those or you can look them up yourself. Hope that helps! Remember intelligent training will probably yield the greatest effects on performance. I would strongly consider you read Easy Strength by Dan John and Pavel to better grasp athletic planning and implementation of your training.

Lastly, your diet seems overly high in protein and inadequate in carbohydrates. Try increasing the amount of pasta and bread and you will likely perform better. I would aim for no less than 250g-300g a day if you wish to have high training volume.

Last edited by Bill M. Hesse : 06-14-2013 at 05:42 AM.
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:42 AM   #9
Jeff Enge
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Re: Supplements

Where on that timeline do your workouts fit in?

Do you have anything specific in mind in terms of body composition - in other words, are you happy with it, or do you - for example - want to gain weight, get leaner, etc?

What's you budget look like? Don't need specifics. But some of the supplements out there are fairly expensive relative to somebody without a disposible income. The good news is, some of the most effective ones are actually pretty cheap.

Disclaimer - I'm not going to give specific recommendations, I'm not a nutritionist by any means. I'm just trying to get the most complete information possible so people with more knowledge than me can give the best advice they can, because it streamlines the process and somebody has to do it.

However, I do feel compelled to add that working out every day and multiple times a day without any rest is a recipe for recovery disaster. Taking proper rest is just as important as training regularly. Even when I was a college athlete (aka, athletics was pretty much my job besides going to school) we had a recovery day during the week and 48 hours of rest between Saturday and Monday morning practices.
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Old 06-14-2013, 07:17 AM   #10
John C Blattner
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Re: Supplements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Enge View Post
It would be irresponsible to recommend supplements with so little information to go by.

What does your diet look like? If you get enough protein in your food, theres no reason to take whey. If you dont have some kind of fasting diet, you should be able to get enough BCAAs from a good whey supplement and not need an extra BCAA product.

What are your workout goals? If getting stronger isnt one of your main goals than spending the money on creatine and/or beta alanine is probably unneccessary.

Fish oil, however, is a pretty good general purpose supplement.
I have similar question to OP. I'm 60, 6'0" and have been CF'ing for about a year and a half after years of being a couch potato. One of my original goals was weight loss, I dropped from 215 lbs to 185 in a few months by simple calorie reduction in connection with 3 WODs per week. I stabilized at that level for about year, during which I had knee replacement surgery and was pretty happy just to maintain status quo.

Recently I decided I wanted to drop another 5-10 pounds. I reverted to my former low-carb calorie-reduction diet, which (a) didn't work and (b) left me feeling lethargic and tired. From reading this forum I've come to realize that I need to eat more calories, not fewer, and especially more carbs and fats. I've started using Eat to Perform as a basic model. Initially added a couple pounds but am now back at 185 and feeling much more energetic, having more productive WODs etc.

My goal is now to reduce body fat percentage rather than overall body weight per se. I haven't been able to locate a place that does hydrostatic measurement but from rudimentary use of calipers and comparisons to photos posted online I guesstimate that I'm roughly 22-25%.

My fitness goals are basically General Physical Preparedness. We do plenty of strength work in my box but it's not a major objective for me. Plus having an artificial knee puts some restrictions on how heavy I should go anyway (it also precludes running but between C2, Airdyne, and burpees I can substitute for that pretty well). I WOD 4-5 times a week and do some outdoor bicycling as well.

I'd be interested in everyone's thoughts re:

1. Appropriate targets for daily fats/carbs/protein. Lots of different formulas online, I'm not sure whether they are oriented to a focus on GPP or on lifting heavy, or to people that work out a lot more strenuously than I do.

2. Use of supplements, mainly to help hit the fats/carbs/protein targets. My diet is basically lots of meat & fish, fruits, veggies, eggs, some grocery-store-type protein bars and shakes. I'm learning how to work in nuts, seeds, olives, etc for fats, and slowly getting accustomed to the idea that it's okay to eat a lot more carbs than I've been used to. Again: what supplements might be useful for someone like me who isn't primarily looking to "muscle up"? (I should add that I've been taking fish oil supplement for quite a while and recently experimented with GenR8 as a way to ramp up my carb intake.) Would I benefit from Creatin or ProGenX, for example?

Sorry for the lengthy post...
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