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Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

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Old 12-04-2005, 02:15 PM   #1
Jamila Bey
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It's called inutitive eating, and I've never heard of it. Anyone care to weigh in?

Jamila


Professor Loses Weight With No-Diet Diet By BROCK VERGAKIS, Associated Press Writer
Sun Dec 4,12:16 PM ET

When Steven Hawks is tempted by ice cream bars, M&Ms and toffee-covered almonds at the grocery store, he doesn't pass them by. He fills up his shopping cart.

It's the no-diet diet, an approach the Brigham Young University health science professor used to lose 50 pounds and to keep it off for more than five years.

Hawks calls his plan "intuitive eating" and thinks the rest of the country would be better off if people stopped counting calories, started paying attention to hunger pangs and ate whatever they wanted.

As part of intuitive eating, Hawks surrounds himself with unhealthy foods he especially craves. He says having an overabundance of what's taboo helps him lose his desire to gorge.

There is a catch to this no-diet diet, however: Intuitive eaters only eat when they're hungry and stop when they're full.

That means not eating a box of chocolates when you're feeling blue or digging into a big plate of nachos just because everyone else at the table is.

The trade-off is the opportunity to eat whatever your heart desires when you are actually hungry.

"One of the advantages of intuitive eating is you're always eating things that are most appealing to you, not out of emotional reasons, not because it's there and tastes good," he said. "Whenever you feel the physical urge to eat something, accept it and eat it. The cravings tend to subside. I don't have anywhere near the cravings I would as a 'restrained eater.'"

Hawks should know. In 1989, the Utah native had a job at North Carolina State University in Raleigh and wanted to return to his home state. But at 210 pounds, he didn't think a fat person could get a job teaching students how to be healthy, so his calorie-counting began.

He lost weight and got the job at Utah State University. But the pounds soon came back.

For several years his weight fluctuated, until he eventually gave up on being a restrained eater and the weight stayed on.

"You definitely lose weight on a diet, but resisting biological pressures is ultimately doomed," Hawks said.

Several years later and still overweight at a new job at BYU, Hawks decided it was time for a lifestyle change.

He stopped feeling guilty about eating salt-and-vinegar potato chips. He also stopped eating when he wasn't hungry.

Slowly and steadily his weight began to drop. Exercise helped.

His friends and co-workers soon took notice of the slimmer Hawks.

"It astonished me, actually," said his friend, Steven Peck. "We were both very heavy. It was hard not to be struck."

After watching Hawks lose and keep the weight off for a year and a half, Peck tried intuitive eating in January.

"I was pretty skeptical of the idea you could eat anything you wanted until you didn't feel like it. It struck me as odd," said Peck, who is an assistant professor at BYU.

But 11 months later, Peck sometimes eats mint chocolate chip ice cream for dinner, is 35 pounds lighter and a believer in intuitive eating.

"There are times when I overeat. I did at Thanksgiving," Peck said. "That's one thing about Steve's ideas, they're sort of forgiving. On other diets if you slip up, you feel you've blown it and it takes a couple weeks get back into it. ... This sort of has this built-in forgiveness factor."

The one thing all diets have in common is that they restrict food, said Michael Goran, an obesity expert at the University of Southern California. Ultimately, that's why they usually fail, he said.

"At some point you want what you can't have," Goran said. Still, he said intuitive eating makes sense as a concept "if you know what you're doing."

Intuitive eating alone won't give anyone six-pack abs, Hawks said, but it will lead to a healthier lifestyle. He still eats junk food and keeps a jar of honey in his office, but only indulges occasionally.

"My diet is actually quite healthy. ... I'm as likely to eat broccoli as eat a steak," he said. "It's a misconception that all of a sudden a diet is going to become all junk food and high fat," he said.

In a small study published in the American Journal of Health Education, Hawks and a team of researchers examined a group of BYU students and found those who were intuitive eaters typically weighed less and had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than other students.

He said the study indicates intuitive eating is a viable approach to long-term weight management and he plans to do a larger study across different cultures. Ultimately, he'd like intuitive eating to catch on as a way for people to normalize their relationship with food and fight eating disorders.

"Most of what the government is telling us is, we need to count calories, restrict fat grams, etc. I feel like that's a harmful message," he said. "I think encouraging dietary restraint creates more problems. I hope intuitive eating will be adopted at a national level."

___

On the Net:

National Institute for Intuitive Eating http://www.intuitiveeating.com



Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.


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Old 12-04-2005, 02:33 PM   #2
Matt Gagliardi
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First thought:
The only concepts mentioned were weight and "health". I saw nothing about optimal performance.
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Old 12-04-2005, 02:58 PM   #3
Nikki Young
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I could see that 'diet' being extremely un-healthy for a lot of people deciding to start on it without much info on nutrition in general. Just the fact of stopping eating when you're full, isn't going to prevent someone digging into the choc chip cookies if they don't understand that the body needs adequate nutrition from a vast array of foods, fruit, veggies, etc.

I'm sure there is more to his method though. In terms of foods and stuff, outside of this article.
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Old 12-04-2005, 02:59 PM   #4
Jamila Bey
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You're right about that...

I guess then my question is for me- F 29 about 30# too heavy but quite strong. If I was to lose the weight, my performance would improve. Today I tried to do ring dips- I can do a few dips on a Roman chair- but on rings I didn't have the strength to safely lower myself. If I was lighter, I could perform this skill.

I am new to CF and I want to lose 30 pounds in the shortest amount of time safely. I do Tae Kwon Do, but I'm not as concerned about optimal performance as that I lose this fat- then I'll work on improving my performance.

Any tips?

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Old 12-04-2005, 03:02 PM   #5
Jamila Bey
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Thanks Nikki,

I think a big problem is that the average person doesn't KNOW when s/he's had enough. We eat until the bowl/plate/feed bag is empty.

I just cut out all caloric beverages from my diet because I'd drink 400 calories and still be starving. My diet is clean, I'm just looking for the edge that is going to get me back to GREAT shape.
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Old 12-04-2005, 03:18 PM   #6
Rob McBee
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Matt G. made an interesting point about the limited scope of this 'diet'. I'd argue that its not healthy either in addition to actually hurting physical performance. The diets 'inventor' seems very proud of the weight loss. Ok, being stranded on a desert island or full blown AIDS will cause weight loss. Is that healthy too?

He lost weight by the old 'more cals burned than consumed' approach. I'd be curious to know what his trigylcerides and serum insulin levels look like for starters.
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Old 12-04-2005, 03:25 PM   #7
Nikki Young
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Jamila - Have you checked out the zone? A lot of people on this forum eat 'zone style' and swear by it for optimal performance and weight loss. Get your hands on the book 'Mastering the Zone' by Barry Sears; you can pick it up pretty cheap on e-bay and probably some other places too.

Also, you can read up on what the zone is about here: http://www.zoneperfect.com/site/cont...terTheZone.asp
And that will give you some good info on what the Zone aims to achieve and how it effects the body. It's a very informative and easy read.

Also, issue 23 of the CF journal has a good write up on the Zone and getting to understand it better. And if you are interested in giving it a go it also provides you with a block chart for popular foods (if you're confused when i said 'blocks', the link will explain)

Hope that helps! :happy:

(Message edited by shnikkidrum on December 04, 2005)
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Old 12-04-2005, 07:46 PM   #8
Nikki Young
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Issue 21 sorry! Not 23..
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Old 12-04-2005, 09:18 PM   #9
Andy Shirley
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Jamila,
I wouldn't stress the ring dips. They are difficult for most people at first. My first attempt on the rings(a week or two ago) I could hardly hold myself in support, much less do a ring dip. Strength wasn't the issue(400+ bench press, 30 bar dips without a problem).

It is the functional stabilization required by rings that make them so difficult. The only way to get better is to practice on the rings.
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Old 12-05-2005, 06:35 AM   #10
Jamila Bey
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I've ordered Zone books and joined the website. I'll also get the journal- Thanks Nikki!- but so far, my eyes are glazing over and I'm nowhere near being able to figure out "Zoneworthy meals." It'll come though... I just have to be patient and stay awake as I read.

And as far as ring dips, I won't stress- it's one of those things that look like so much fun when the BIG KIDS do them that it's killing me to have to hang back. All things in time. It took me oh... 4 or 5 years to put on the weight and even should it take me that long to take it off (though it better not!), I'm moving in the right direction.
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