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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 02-27-2005, 11:44 PM   #1
Michael Halbfish
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From time to time I've seen messages or chatted with Crossfitters who suddenly took a huge leap in performance. There are also some Crossfitters like Nick and Graham who seem to progress consistently at a very rapid rate. I am curious what changes have helped people make their greatest progress. For me, the answers are:
1) Going to the Crossfit Trainers Seminar
2) Zone Diet
3) Varying my intensity
4) Eliminating rests betweeen exercises and cutting resting time.
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Old 02-28-2005, 12:10 AM   #2
Pat Janes
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Numbers 2) and 4) have been a big help to me, Michael.

I've seen much improved:
- level of performance
- recovery
- body composition

since both starting the Zone and giving away vegetarianism about 3 months ago.

I was certainly progressing before that; but the Zone diet has been, for me at least, the last little kick I needed to really get going. Of course, eating meat has no doubt got something to do with it as well.

Number 4) has also helped my times on the WODs. I'm not up there with the superstars, but I'm getting ever closer. Of course, you can't really cut resting time and/or time between exercises without being fit enough, so it becomes a little bit of a circular argument. Occasionally though, I think you do just have to "decide" that you don't need quite as much rest as you thought and push on regardless.

I got through "Fractured Fran" about 2 1/2 minutes quicker than my last real "Fran"; that is partly due, I'm sure to the different format, but it's also because I "decided" prior to the WOD that I was going to do the thrusters unbroken.


I'd do almost anything to accomplish 1) but from over here in Australia, it's going to take a little organising.

I haven't done much with 3) explicitly; I was supposed to have a half volume week this week, but I liked the look of the WODs so much, I succumbed to doing them as written (can't help myself). I have taken a week off now and then and that's helped refresh me.
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Old 02-28-2005, 03:48 AM   #3
Peter Galloway
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I am still pretty new to this, but what I have already noticed is that as my fitness improves the biggest improvement is coming from reduced resting time. Although I am now capable of performing more pull-ups, push-ups etc, the time I save as result of this is insignificant compared to the time I save by being able to force myself to get back to work.

The cool thing is that I'm just as tired mid-workout now as I was when I started. Proof if it were needed that CF developes an ability to perform work whilst in a state of exhaustion
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Old 02-28-2005, 10:46 AM   #4
Troy Archie
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My fitness has gone through the roof. When I compare my current benchmark days with ones from when I started back in the fall, the difference is huge. I took December off due to surgery and the only thing I did was walk on a treadmill. When I came back in the New Year I figure I was starting at zero again and in the following 2 months the gains have been large and consistent.

I'd have to say, for myself that, #4 was the biggest force behind it all and I'd like to even add intensity into that category. I just started a true Zone diet a week ago and already the results are showing. Like you Pat, I was planning on scaling back this week’s WOD but "Linda" beckoned me to go all out and I'm glad I did. Next 3 day set I'll scale it back.
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Old 02-28-2005, 10:49 AM   #5
Ron Nelson
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My biggest gains came after a week off from the WOD. I hit Helen with full intensity and improved my time by 2 min. Ofcourse, my previous Helen was at the beginning of my CF experience, so that might have something to do with it.
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Old 02-28-2005, 03:56 PM   #6
Larry Lindenman
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Posting benchmark times on a white board lead to a visual mark I had to beat! Getting a feel for how long a WOD should take dictates my stratagy. At first you looked at a chipper and thought "This is going to take 2 hours!" If you did it in 45 minutes, you now know: "This should take under 45 minutes." Now you have a goal to shoot for.
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Old 02-28-2005, 04:04 PM   #7
Graham Hayes
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I did "Isabel" the other day and put my stop watch where I could see it. An eye on the clock push's you to beat previous times/current expectations.

Someone like Dave K posts quite early in the day, and posts great times. When I see the time trickle past Dave's mark that get's me going full steam again. Play head games with yourself.
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Old 02-28-2005, 04:56 PM   #8
Troy Archie
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That would be cool to have a score board sized clock with 1' high numbers in your gym, ticking away making every single second seem that much longer. I bet you'd notice an increase in performance with that.
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Old 02-28-2005, 07:38 PM   #9
Theron Mathis
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no doubt, there is something psychological to performance. For example, when the elusive four minture mile was broken by one person several others broke it shortly.

Recently, I attribute my much improved Fran times to seeing the video of Fran being done at high speed. Although I had seen the times posted before, it was unbelievable in my mind. Once I saw someone do it, I realized it could be done, and I know this added to my own performance.
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Old 02-28-2005, 08:18 PM   #10
Scott Kustes
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I did "Isabel" the other day and put my stop watch where I could see it. An eye on the clock push's you to beat previous times/current expectations.
This can work both positively and negatively. I've also found myself looking at the time and calculating how to pace myself to beat my previous time instead of just going all out...can lead to worrying too much about how to do it and too little about just doing it.
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