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Old 05-10-2007, 06:19 PM   #1
Valerie Schirmer
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As a 14 year old, I detached my tendon at the very top of the back of my right leg, (hamstring, I assume) That was 35 years ago. I laid off of all sports for 9 months, and eased back into track, gymnastics, dance, etc. with no problems. I still had the flexibility and the strength through my 20s. No pain, no problems.

I was pretty inactive for the next 15 years, and now, I am feeling pain in the area that I injured way back when. I have researched as much as I can, and avoid seeing a Doc....anyone have any input?
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Old 05-10-2007, 06:56 PM   #2
Garrett Smith
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Valerie,
Besides having some unresolved scar tissue in the area, you are likely suffering from an intolerance of the nightshade family of plants (tomatoes, potatoes, all peppers, eggplant, and paprika). The inflammation they cause accumulates at (particularly) sites of old injuries. Look at your diet--I'd bet you eat one or more of those listed on a nearly daily basis (as do most Americans, and arthritis isn't getting any less common, I'll tell you that much).

For more info, search this board and go to www.noarthritis.com .

You likely also need to get on a significant dose of fish oil.
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Old 05-11-2007, 10:25 PM   #3
Mike Moore
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Valerie, it sounds like you had an apophyseal avulsion fracture, probably of the ischial tuberosity (the part of the pelvis where the hamstrings have an attachment). Basically, the tendon attaches to a "growth plate" that hasn't fused to the main part of the pelvis and you avulsed or broke this growth plate. Without exam it's conjecture as to whetehr or not your current pain is due to the old injury. If it is due to the old injury, it could be the result of scar tissue or excessive callus formation or it could be that the old injury never completely healed (even though your symptoms resolved), i.e the problem could be either at the site of the tendon attachment or in he musculotendinous unit. A PT plan would probably be helpful, depending on the injury, but done incorrectly could exacerbate your symptoms. You are 49. People start getting really stiff around that age. Movements that previously didn't place significant traction on the site of the old imjury may be doing so now. I would recommend seeing an orthopedic surgeon to get a correct diagnosis so that a correct treatment plan can be started. It sounds like you have been having pain for more than 1 or 2 days. These things tend to develop into chronic problems if you don't treat them appropriately in their early stages, i.e. pay me now or pay me (much more) later.
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Old 05-12-2007, 10:47 PM   #4
Valerie Schirmer
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Mike,
Thank you so much for the info and input.
This has been a very difficult few days. I am going to to be smart, and see a Doc. I simply have a difficult time dealing with this....I want to be the person who doesn't give in to my age.
At the same time, I don't need to be a hero, and risk injury. If I stay away from certain lifts, I may be ok. What stinks is that stretching in general seems to irritate that particular area.
Somehow I will compete again, in some capacity. My heart and head tells me so, even though my body is saying, "Stop it Val!"
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Old 05-13-2007, 06:51 PM   #5
Mike Moore
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Valerie, there is a condition called "Weaver's Bottom" that is essentially a bursitis of the ischialgluteal bursa (a fluid sac that acts as a cushion) which is located in the region of your old injury. It is possible that when the old injury healed, the bone that was pulled away from its normal position healed in a slightly abnormal position leading to a prominence of the ischial tuberosity (ie the bone sticks out a little more than normal). This couls make it easier to irritate this bursa either from direct contact, e.g. prolonged sitting) or indirectly e.g. from the action of the hamstrings. Anyway, am interested in what your doc discovers and how your progress goes.

PS - Sometimes these things take a long time to heal is us "master" athletes, so don't get discouraged. Just get an accurate diagnosis ansd a sensible treatment plan and persist at recovering and exceeding prior performance.
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