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Old 10-29-2005, 09:11 PM   #1
Sean Harrison
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I'll be doing a 10K in December and have been following Crossfit for a while and this'll be my first 10K in about 5 years ( did a 1/2 Mara last year). I want to see how well I do without a lot of training...just the WODs
I'm 220lbs at 6 feet even if that helps in relating your experience.
Thanks.
Training advice accepted too.
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Old 10-30-2005, 01:06 PM   #2
Matt Gagliardi
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Sean, if you're looking to go w/o a lot of extra training, I'd suggest running it Fartlek style.
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Old 10-30-2005, 03:03 PM   #3
Eugene R. Allen
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Sean - While I applaud your willingness to experiment with the GPP that CF provides with the SPP you need for the 6.2 miles of running you will do for your race, I do hope you have no illusions of being fast or comfortable during the race. If you are already a competent runner with distance work under your belt, the intensity of CF WOD's and the short bits of running found in the CF workouts will be adequate for that race distance. Not optimum by any means, but adequate.

Running a mile at competition pace is 50% endurance and 50% speed. Shorter distances move the scale toward speed and longer distances toward endurance. You will be fast enough for this race in that you will have a nice fast leg turnover, but you will begin to suffer from about the half way point to the finish because you will not have the endurance to maintain your race pace.

Coach has pointed out that we are weak at the margins of our experience. You are good at what you do Sean and if what you do is run short and fast that's what you will be good at. The 10k is not a short and fast race.

You want some training advice? It's a running race Sean, you need to do run training. You need a few runs of that distance to get your body used to that, you need some threshold work, some track intervals and some tempo training. Don't play the piccolo to prepare for your piano recital.

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Old 10-30-2005, 04:25 PM   #4
Matt Gagliardi
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Precisely why I suggested kind of a Fartlek-type run Eugene. He can sprint/run hard until he tires, then fall back to a more comfortable pace to recover a bit. Then repeat as necessary. That kind of running would mimic (to some extent) the way WODs tend to work.

I guess it's a question of the purpose of the run. If it's purely for fun and just to see how fast he can go (with minimal training other than the WOD) then I think the Fartlek strategy would work. But if there's a "purpose" to it...he's really racing someone, etc. then I'd agree with you that he'd be best served by doing some SPP work.

We need more info.
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Old 10-30-2005, 05:50 PM   #5
Eugene R. Allen
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You heard him Sean, Matt wants s'more info. Fork it over. Is this indeed an experiment to check on the efficacy of CF's high intensity training alone as a training method for a 10k run? If so, hope for a lot of WOD's with runs in them. If you want to get a decent time in your race you need to run more.

I would also recommend that if you follow Matt's Fartlek racing method you not actually sprint but run at a controlled pace that allows you to run for either distance or time with an interval of walking. DO NOT run so hard you start feeling as though you were doing a CF workout. If you do you will walk most of the race. Start fairly slowly and try to finish strong, not the other way around.
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Old 10-30-2005, 06:06 PM   #6
Laura Rucker
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Sean, I am not a runner by any means. About 4 years ago I started running as part of a plan to lose wt and get healthier. I built up to a 5m per hour pace on 5 mile runs - 3-5 days a week.

I did a few 5Ks on that training regime - my best time was 34 minutes on the Carlsbad 5k. Then I fell out of the habit and quit running altogether. I started crossfit (and didn't pick up back my running) about 18 months ago.

I ran the CB5K again (2 years had lapsed) this year and picked up a about 2 minutes - finishing at 30 and change.

I ran the Camp Pendleton Mud Run this year - 10K with obstacles - in 1:27 if memory serves. It was painful and at times I wasn't sure I could finish. But I did.

I defer to Matt G and Eug when it comes to SPP training for running, but if you are doing your 5 and 10K's when they come up on the WOD and are satisfied with the results, go for it.

Matt, I think Fartlek must be how I run... I bust out til I fall out, then I slow down or walk to get my wind back.
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Old 10-30-2005, 07:44 PM   #7
Matt Gagliardi
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An excellent point Eugene. I didn't mean "sprint" in the 100m sense of the word. Rather, that the effort be taken to an increased (though not suicidal or Mo Green) pace.
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Old 10-30-2005, 08:52 PM   #8
Eric Moffit
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i just did this on Friday. no serious running work outside the WOD (i do add a few 5Ks here and there and i try to add running 'practice' 2-3 times a week, which consists of 10-12 100s at a quicker pace focusing exclusively on form). i ran it in 52:28. started off feeling very comfortable (read: slightly slow) and when i started the second 5k, i felt good so i started pushing it (enough to negative split it, ~26:30/~26:00).

my advice...go for it without serious SPP. why?...because its fun. for me it was a challenge, and i was very curious to see how i would fare. itll help to mentally walk through the race the night before and then run the race you walked through on race day. and while youre running, continually check your form. this is important to reduce the chance of injury.

oh yeah, my stats are 6'2", 205 w/ a 5k in a little under 24:00. and my runs are @3800ft.
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Old 10-30-2005, 10:34 PM   #9
Andrew Cattermole
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I would recommend interval training based around 400m & 800m. Sloted in twice a week if possible.
Warm up with techique over a slow 1.6km/1 m.
Max of 10(start with 5/6) intervals with max 2 mins between each interval working down to 1.30min (or lower if you feel comfortable but not below 1 min)
Warm Down with 1.2 slow technique(shuffles,backward run etc)
An slightly more condition based alternative is
400 ladder with 400 rest 2min 800 R 2min 1200 R 2min 1600 R 2min 1200 R 2min 800 R 2 min 400
See how they go
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Old 10-31-2005, 01:24 PM   #10
Eugene R. Allen
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Now that's some run training, well done Andrew. Intervals are very CrossFit-like and would suit this race well. I still think you need a couple long runs but then again I'm distance guy.

Generally speaking the top end of interval training will be around 5 minutes effort with the bottom around 30 seconds. Your rest interval will typically be roughly the same as your work interval. If you decide on 400 repeats for example...or for clarity perhaps I should say repeats of 400, and you can crank out several at 1:30 (6:00 per mile pace) you do a lap in 1:30 and then rest for 1:30. You can slow to a walk for 30 seconds, jog slowly for 30 seconds, stand still and perhaps stretch gently and shake your legs for 30 seconds and then take off again for 6 reps to start. Another way to do it is to establish a send time....say 3:00. That means you get whatever amount of rest is left over from the time you finish the run to when your next send time is at 3:00. Finish fast and you get more rest...slow down and you get less rest time.

As part of your warm up or cool down as Andrew mentioned should be some run drills such as butt kickers, high knees, skipping, caraoke and strides. Just as with the rest of CrossFit using good technique is paramount so be mindful of your form. Do not land on your heels, swing your arms fore and aft elbows and fingernails in line and brushing your hips without rotating your shoulders. Investigate Pose running by Dr. Nikolai Romanov. Read books by Jack Daniels and Hal Higdon.

Oh, and run.
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