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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 05-23-2007, 09:50 PM   #1
Dave Clarke
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Lets say I do a workout, say tabata squats, 50KB swings, tabata squats, at a high intensity

We all know that my metabolism is going to go through the roof for that workout, and for some time afterwards, evidenced by groaning on the floor, unable to speak etc.

For how long after a workour is the metabolism boosted? An hour? Many hours?

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Dave in oz
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Old 05-23-2007, 10:05 PM   #2
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last research I saw showed elevation for upwards of 48 hrs. clearly at the 48th hr, it's not dramatic, but consider the summative effective of consecutive workouts. so a number of factors will influence the actual time and degree, but both can be significant.
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Old 05-23-2007, 11:00 PM   #3
Steven Low
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To add on to what Greg said:

Almost any type of training that damages muscle tissue, metabolism -- anabolic processes (specifically protein synthesis) -- will be elevated for approximately 48 hours afterwards. High intensity exercises will obviously stimulate more because they release greater amounts of androgens/GH.

Intensity generally refers to the amount of strength involved (e.g. closer to 1 RM). However, intensity I suppose can also mean more metcon-ish stuff where the rest periods are kept low to keep the power output high. Both stimulate ample amounts of hormone release and kick metabolism up.

(Message edited by braindx on May 24, 2007)
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Old 05-24-2007, 09:55 AM   #4
Connie Morreale
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steven is right about damage to the muscle and the following need for growth hormones to start flowing.

strength workouts can raise the metabolism for UP TO 48 hours.
aerobic exercise, which means "in the presence of oxygen" elevate it for only 1-3 hours afterwards.

most all crossfit workouts are over the aerobic threshold (assuming they are done balls to the wall).
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Old 05-24-2007, 01:45 PM   #5
Steven Low
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Connie:

Metcon still elevate for up to 48 hours even though they're above aerobic threshold. The intensity and duration of the exercises modulate hormone release.

1. Strength training releases because the intensity of the exercises are very high.

2. Metcon releases because there is very short rest periods which puts significant stress on the muscles (e.g. high power).

3. HIIT is very effective in the same regard because like metcon the sprints are at very high intensity while the fast jogging inbetween sprints are still at relatively moderate intensity. The power output of the body is near it's maximal output which stimulate hormone release.

4. Aerobic exercise, on the other hand, like jogging for 30-60 minutes is at usually low to moderate intensity. This is not enough to stimulate hormone release.

One of the major epiphanies I've come across over the past few years is that the energy pathways your body uses aren't all cut and dried like we make them out to be (along with the strength-endurance repetition continuum and a few others). The point being that as intensity increases, burning ATP to the point where you need to utilize the next energy pathway as a primary source of ATP regeneration is quicker. This is illustrated by something I conjured up some odd months back:

w/f safe.
http://img511.imageshack.us/img511/2...athwaysdm4.jpg

It is that high intensity that damages muscle fibers and is enough stress on the muscles to simulate the hormone release. That's why it's pretty much only the intensity that is a modulator of those... not because you hit the aerobic (oxidative phosphorylation) threshold or anything.

In any case, that was a bit off topic, but I think it serves to illustrate my point. If I kind of interpreted your saying wrong then I apologize. :-)
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Old 05-24-2007, 02:06 PM   #6
Connie Morreale
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thats what i said, steven, most all crossfit workouts are ABOVE the aerobic threshold.
i am well versed in everything you just told me
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Old 05-24-2007, 02:13 PM   #7
Steven Low
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Haha, ok :-)

Shrug. Above aerobic threshold doesn't really mean much really that's why I wanted to clarify.
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Old 05-24-2007, 09:57 PM   #8
Dave Clarke
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Thanks for that.

Dave in oz
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