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Old 01-23-2013, 05:56 AM   #1411
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Originally Posted by Rebecca Roth View Post
So I can't help but ask, you are now at a relative average/"normal" bodyweight. Are you planning to transition to standard crossfit at some point? Also, any plan to unveil before/after photos or are you waiting for that 10%bf mark?
Hi, Rebecca. Thanks for dropping by.

Actually, I am not at normal bodyweight. Not yet. My BFC is roughly 25%, which puts me on the threshold between being obese and overweight. At 233 pounds, my BMI is 29.3 which is just below the overweight/obese threshold for BMI which is 30. I still have about 40 pounds to lose, maybe more, maybe less. It is hard to tell, because I don't really know how much Lean Body Mass I will have once I get down to better BFC levels and I get around to more precise measurements of BFC.

For various reasons which I will post in detail later this week, I am taking a break from fat loss during the winter for about four or five months. After that, I will resume a fat loss regimen, though it remains undecided which kind - slow and steady while exercising somewhat hard, or rapid fat loss while exercising easy. To be determined.

Photos! Photos? Another girl posting to my workout log asking for photos? Gosh, didn't I just post about my struggles with vanity muscles, and now I have girls asking me for pics? You aren't making my vanity problem any easier here, Rebecca. Yeesh girl, you're like Moses on the mountain, badgering Yahweh for a glimpse.

OK.... OK... fine. Once the weather warms up a bit next week I'll don some shorts and a T-shirt, go outside, and see what sort of photo I can come up with. But don't expect too much. Think Moses on the mountain here. And I might try to see if I can tweak Patrick's nose a wee bit at the same time.
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Old 01-23-2013, 06:13 AM   #1412
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Anybody Notice A Pattern Here?
Below is a brief table featuring the date and my four-day rolling average for bodyweight. This is something which I literally have not seen in almost two years - steady bodyweight. I have either been steadily losing weight, or else watched it spike up or down as I moved out of or into ketosis. I know that for most people steady is normal, but for me it is weird.

While bodyweight has held steady, my LBM has increased by two pounds over this time while FBM has decreased two pounds. This is good, for a while, but I really want to stabilize FBM. During my recuperation and recovery phase, I do not want to lose fat. Losing fat means continued "starvation", and I want to switch my metabolism over to "not starving" during these coming months which means holding FBM steady or even gaining slightly.

Anyway, while my transition to steady bodyweight came a bit sooner than I expected, I am rolling with it. I have increased calories and carbs, and will soon switch over to a proper mixed sport athletic training diet which will include more protein and slight caloric surplus. In the meantime, I'll be logging my food consumption to figure out what my new daily caloric balance is. This will help me to fine tune my training diet going forward.
__Date______Weight_
01/11/13___233 lbs
01/12/13___233 lbs
01/13/13___232 lbs
01/14/13___232 lbs
01/15/13___232 lbs
01/16/13___233 lbs
01/17/13___233 lbs
01/18/13___233 lbs
01/19/13___233 lbs
01/20/13___233 lbs
01/21/13___233 lbs
01/22/13___233 lbs
01/23/13___233 lbs
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Old 01-23-2013, 02:39 PM   #1413
Patrick Haskell
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Originally Posted by Luke Seubert View Post
CFFB at most does two lifts per workout, oftentimes just one; as opposed to SS's three lifts per workout. Since I am meticulous in doing all the prescribed warmup lifts, I found the SS workouts ran quite long for me - up to 100 minutes in some cases.

I find it fascinating how roughly similar the Starting Strength and CFFB Amateur Offseason programs are. The same basic lifts and assistance lifts, using the same set and rep schemes, with a slightly different weekly workout plan. Both put an emphasis on plenty of squats.

I am curious - would it not be better to do foam rolling after doing yoga or light aerobics, and not before? That is, should foam rolling be done after warming up the muscles with other exercises, or can it be done before other exercises with cold muscles?

What about splitting strength (with maybe some conditioning) workouts from skills, mobility, foam roller, and very light aerobic workouts. I am thinking strength training in the early AM with the other, lighter types of work in the late afternoon or early evening.
Yes, SS workouts can be a slog, particularly when you need to warmup like a 40-year-old on a cold day, as I do 7 months out of the year.

The similarity between SS and the amateur CFFB program is not coincidental. First, squats are foundational in strength training, particularly for beginners, who need to learn to use their hamstrings to develop athletically. 2nd, Welboune had the chance to work with Rip and Kilgore some before developing the CFFB protocol and probably saw how well SS worked for beginners. (John has his own extensive training background, but it had been a long while since he worked with amateurs, as he started CFFB soon after leaving the NFL.)

You can foam roll cold. It's to break adhesions and makes a great part of a warmup. I usually do it first in my own warmup, but will sometimes work it in later, although that's usually because I realize that I shouldn't have skipped it. It definitely helps me find problem areas and soften them up for the warmup. Others have documented preformanc improvements following such work.

Skills, mobility, and light conditionoing work can definitely be split from the more intesive workouts. Those are recovery work and can be done whenever and are encouraged for off days. Foam rolling can be done as both tissue prep or as part of recovery (or as tissue prep for mobility work).
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Old 01-23-2013, 05:38 PM   #1414
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Yes, SS workouts can be a slog, particularly when you need to warmup like a 40-year-old on a cold day, as I do 7 months out of the year.

The similarity between SS and the amateur CFFB program is not coincidental. First, squats are foundational in strength training, particularly for beginners, who need to learn to use their hamstrings to develop athletically. 2nd, Welboune had the chance to work with Rip and Kilgore some before developing the CFFB protocol and probably saw how well SS worked for beginners. (John has his own extensive training background, but it had been a long while since he worked with amateurs, as he started CFFB soon after leaving the NFL.)
Ah, that explains it. I wondered if there was a direct connection between Welbourne and Rippetoe. I can also see why Welbourne adapted SS to CFFB Amateur because I get the distinct impression that Rippetoe trains a lot of young Texas football players in his gym.

Also, the basic lifts in SS and CFFB really are the basic lifts. Every well regarded and respected beginning strength program I have seen uses the same basic lifts, with some of them swapping out pullups for power cleans, or some other modest variation. But when you add up the basic lifts and the recommended assistance lifts from all these different programs, the lift lists are pretty much identical. What works at the introductory level... works. And it is pretty well known by now.

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You can foam roll cold. It's to break adhesions and makes a great part of a warmup. I usually do it first in my own warmup, but will sometimes work it in later, although that's usually because I realize that I shouldn't have skipped it. It definitely helps me find problem areas and soften them up for the warmup. Others have documented preformanc improvements following such work.

Skills, mobility, and light conditionoing work can definitely be split from the more intesive workouts. Those are recovery work and can be done whenever and are encouraged for off days. Foam rolling can be done as both tissue prep or as part of recovery (or as tissue prep for mobility work).
By the way, I have "The Foam Roller Workbook" by Karl Knopf. Are there any other information resources you would recommend to go along with that one?

Finally, I am aware of the Mobility WOD website. I like the idea of a mobility WOD, but the training resources on that website are very poorly organized. If a WOD comes up which I have zero clue about, and that is many of those WODs, there is rarely a link to a previous post with detailed explanations or videos. I have used numerous search methods to try to dig out this information, to no avail. Also, recent posts have been quite irregular.

Are there any good resources you would recommend for regular mobility work?
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Old 01-24-2013, 06:03 AM   #1415
Patrick Haskell
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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By the way, I have "The Foam Roller Workbook" by Karl Knopf. Are there any other information resources you would recommend to go along with that one?

Finally, I am aware of the Mobility WOD website. I like the idea of a mobility WOD, but the training resources on that website are very poorly organized. If a WOD comes up which I have zero clue about, and that is many of those WODs, there is rarely a link to a previous post with detailed explanations or videos. I have used numerous search methods to try to dig out this information, to no avail. Also, recent posts have been quite irregular.

Are there any good resources you would recommend for regular mobility work?
I have a copy of an e-book by Mike Robertson entitled Self-Myofacial Release. It is available free from his website without the need to login or provide any information. Mike Robertson has lots of good information on mobility, as does Eric Cressey, with whom he has worked on a few projects. They are my go-to guys, although the mWOD has great stuff, too, if you can keep track of it and use it like a toolbox.

I can't compare Robertson's e-book to other resources, as SMR works pretty well as a self-directed exercise. There are definitely some pearls scattered about Kelly's site, but as you said, that can be poorly organized. One such pearl (of pain) is combining flexion and extension of the joint on which muscle tissue upon which you are working acts. He calls it "flossing the joint." What I find most relevant about it is that SMR has different affects on a tissue, depending on what position it is in, so you can sometimes get through a tight spot better at a different angle. At least that's how it has worked best for me.
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:38 PM   #1416
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

WOD - Milo's Not-So-Hilly Sandbag Trudge
  • Date: January 24, 2013
Conditions
  • Temperature: 25 F
  • Windchill: 25 F
  • Humidity: 40%
Comments
With so much snow, ice, and slush on the ground today, I skipped the rugby ball bounce and catch drill, and just walked two miles for my warmup.

With my one mile hilly course clogged up with too much ice and snow, I switched over and carried the sandbag 1.2 miles over my flat course which had a cleaner shoulder alongside the road. I didn't record my heart rate, though it didn't feel too bad. I am getting used to carrying 80 pounds. My time was about as expected given the greater distance. Once the snow and ice melts, I'll resume my usual hilly course for the time being.

Warmup
  • 2.0 Flat & Hilly Miles Walk
1.2 Mostly Flat Miles Sandbag Carry - Alternating Left and Right Shoulders
  • Weight: 80 lbs or 34% of Bodyweight
  • Time: 28:42
  • Heart Rate: n/a
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:39 PM   #1417
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Originally Posted by Patrick Haskell View Post
I have a copy of an e-book by Mike Robertson entitled Self-Myofacial Release. It is available free from his website without the need to login or provide any information. Mike Robertson has lots of good information on mobility, as does Eric Cressey, with whom he has worked on a few projects. They are my go-to guys, although the mWOD has great stuff, too, if you can keep track of it and use it like a toolbox.

I can't compare Robertson's e-book to other resources, as SMR works pretty well as a self-directed exercise. There are definitely some pearls scattered about Kelly's site, but as you said, that can be poorly organized. One such pearl (of pain) is combining flexion and extension of the joint on which muscle tissue upon which you are working acts. He calls it "flossing the joint." What I find most relevant about it is that SMR has different affects on a tissue, depending on what position it is in, so you can sometimes get through a tight spot better at a different angle. At least that's how it has worked best for me.
Thanks for the advice, Patrick. I downloaded the e-book by Robertson, and I'll look into the mobility information you recommended as well.
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Old 01-24-2013, 05:47 PM   #1418
Rebecca Roth
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Hi, Rebecca. Thanks for dropping by.

Actually, I am not at normal bodyweight. Not yet. My BFC is roughly 25%, which puts me on the threshold between being obese and overweight. At 233 pounds, my BMI is 29.3 which is just below the overweight/obese threshold for BMI which is 30. I still have about 40 pounds to lose, maybe more, maybe less. It is hard to tell, because I don't really know how much Lean Body Mass I will have once I get down to better BFC levels and I get around to more precise measurements of BFC.

For various reasons which I will post in detail later this week, I am taking a break from fat loss during the winter for about four or five months. After that, I will resume a fat loss regimen, though it remains undecided which kind - slow and steady while exercising somewhat hard, or rapid fat loss while exercising easy. To be determined.

Photos! Photos? Another girl posting to my workout log asking for photos? Gosh, didn't I just post about my struggles with vanity muscles, and now I have girls asking me for pics? You aren't making my vanity problem any easier here, Rebecca. Yeesh girl, you're like Moses on the mountain, badgering Yahweh for a glimpse.

OK.... OK... fine. Once the weather warms up a bit next week I'll don some shorts and a T-shirt, go outside, and see what sort of photo I can come up with. But don't expect too much. Think Moses on the mountain here. And I might try to see if I can tweak Patrick's nose a wee bit at the same time.

Well, you seem to imply (though indirectly) here, that you aren't quite ready somehow to dive full into cf or whatever (if that is even still on the table after all you've learned). However, your bf is already lower than mine, your BMI is about on par with mine, and I've been doing CF for 2 years. We have a guy at my gym who is about your current size, has lost about 100lb, and he can usually keep up with rx workouts, despite bodyweight movements being a weakness, he also competes.
Really, it's sheer curiosity of mine as to whether or not you are just sandbagging (both literally and figuratively, considering your workouts) yourself, or if the severity of your loss has left you built significantly different.
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Old 01-24-2013, 08:53 PM   #1419
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Well, you seem to imply (though indirectly) here, that you aren't quite ready somehow to dive full into cf or whatever (if that is even still on the table after all you've learned). However, your bf is already lower than mine, your BMI is about on par with mine, and I've been doing CF for 2 years.
Well, if my BFC is lower than yours, take mine and add about 7%. That is roughly the difference between men and women. If I was a lean and healthy man, I would be around 15% BFC. For a woman, the equivalent would be around 22%. So taking my current BFC of 25% and adding 7% yields 32%. If your BFC is lower than that, then you are ahead of me in terms of losing fat and leaning out.

Now, as for your BMI matching mine, it sounds to me that after two years of CrossFit, you have built up enough muscle and bone density to skew the BMI number quite a bit. That often happens with people who exercise a lot. George W. Bush and Barrack Obama both have BMIs that technically qualify them as "Overweight". Obviously, neither of those men are chubby. What they have is lots of dense muscle and bone tissue, which skews the BMI number. This is why I consider BMI one of the least reliable metrics. I note it, but I don't take it too seriously.

My guess is that while your BMI says you are on the theshold between "Overweight" and "Obese" and your BFC says you are a bit overfat, that you don't show much fat though you do have some firm curves thanks to being well muscled.

I still show my fat, though not nearly as much as I once did. My Waist Measurement is almost 39 inches, so that is still a fair sized belly. Lower body musculature is decent, but that is expected after all these decades of hauling around a built-in 200 pound weight vest. My upper body is quite slender, with small musculature. Take a look at one of my Sunday reports and note the small arm and neck measurements. My chest measurement is OK, but that is because of a large ribcage - a family inheritance - not big chest and back muscles.

I understand the point you are trying to make with your comparison, and I address this further on in the post. Though the BMI says our physiques are roughly the same, clearly they are not. I have been dieting hard for nearly two years, while you have been exercising hard for two years. I am guessing I began at a far higher level of obesity than you ever did. When I began, my BFC was 49%, which would be roughly 56% for a woman. So, we began from very different different places, and took distinctly different paths to get where we are today. Is it any wonder there is a disparity in results?

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We have a guy at my gym who is about your current size, has lost about 100lb, and he can usually keep up with rx workouts, despite bodyweight movements being a weakness, he also competes. Really, it's sheer curiosity of mine as to whether or not you are just sandbagging (both literally and figuratively, considering your workouts) yourself, or if the severity of your loss has left you built significantly different.
Great question, Rebecca. I think the answer is a little bit of both - I have been sandbagging it, some of it necessary while some of it my own reluctant hangups. But at the same time, the severity of my loss has left me built a little differently.

First, let me address the necessary sandbagging. When I began at 426 pounds of bodyweight and 49% BFC, I made a very conscientious decision to take that weight off as rapidly as possible to the exclusion of all else. Now, rapid fat loss requires severe caloric deficits. Back in May of 2011, my Basal Metabolic Rate was around 4,100 calories per day. My dietary intake was 1,800 calories per day. With energy needs that high and calories so few, the weight flew off. But so few calories precluded rigorous exercise. In July, 2012 my BMR had dropped to around 3,650 calories per day, while my diet was running about 1,950. Not as huge a caloric deficit, but still a big one. I had ramped up the exercise somewhat, but by early October I had increased it too much and crashed and burned. I took some time off, and began taking more frequent high-carb, caloric-balance breaks. My rate of weight loss has slowed considerably as a result. And yet, my ability to exercise hard is less than it was in the Spring of 2011. My metabolism and recovery capacity are run down quite a bit. (I am currently estimating my latest BMR - I think it is in the low 3,000's now.) This is the main reason I am suspending fat loss for the Winter and pursuing more intense workouts. I need the break.

Rebecca, if you spend any time in the CrossFit Nutrition sub-forum, you'll become familiar with a very common thread. Somebody posts how they recently began CrossFit and a diet, usually low-carb Paleo, and after a few weeks they feel like crap and they don't know what's wrong. Invariably, the wise old hands tell them to eat more food because they just aren't taking in enough calories to sustain that much work. That pretty much describes me for the past 90 weeks. Too few calories for hard exercise. So have I been sandbagging it on the exercise? Yes. Most definitely. Out of physiological necessity.

But I have also been sandbagging it from my own quirky little reluctant hangups. Last October's crash and burn really hit me hard, and it has left me a bit gunshy about pushing the exercise regimen hard. This is a silly hangup which I am just going to have to break. And the sandbag work, oddly, is a way of doing this. Hauling an 80 pound sandbag up and down hills for one mile is a lot tougher than brisk walking three miles, which was my previous conditioning workout. The only reason I have been able to do this is because I am eating at close to caloric balance right now, with much more carbs and fat than I have been eating in the past.

Also, now that my BFC is down to a more manageable level, the tactics change. When I was morbidly obese, I used an unusual and in some ways extreme diet and exercise regimen. Most diets are for people who need to lose 30 pounds, not 230 pounds. Consequently, normal diets don't work for the morbidly obese, who have very different biochemistries and metabolisms from people who are merely overweight or slightly obese. But now I have a mere 30 or 40 pounds to lose. The sorts of diets appropriate for "little people" are now appropriate for me.

But wrapping my head around this reality is a tough mental barrier for me. Dropping 190+ pounds in 90 weeks requires a tremendous amount of stubborn discipline and narrowly-focused drive, week after week, month after month, a never ending daily grind. But now, all of a sudden, all that needs to end. Now, all of a sudden, I am eating a balanced caloric diet and my bodyweight is steady. I eat three meals a day, and because they are normal meals, I feel absolutely stuffed. And that, despite the fact that I am skewing towards high-energy density fats and carbs to ease this transition. If I was eating more stomach-stretching fruits and veggies and less fat and carb-dense starches, like I will be in the coming weeks, I would really be in huge trouble. And here I am, planning to undertake strength training in the coming months, which will require me to eat even more! How do I wrap my head around THAT?!?

Anyway, dealing with these mental hangups is part of this transition phase I am going through, a necessary albeit turbulent part of my lose-fat and get-fit journey.

Finally - yes, finally - the severity of my loss has left me built a little bit differently. And I will always be a little different, now and for the rest of my life. As mentioned previously, morbidly obese people have very different biochemistries and hormonal profiles than do normal people, or even overweight people. The act of losing a lot of fat fairly rapidly also changes biochemistry. And even when I do achieve normal BFC levels and go into permanent caloric balance, I will still be different. Studies show that the formerly obese who keep the fat off have permanently lower metabolisms than those who maintained a normal, healthy weight their entire lives.

Right now, my metabolism is run down. My immune system was mucked up, especially last October and November when I was catching a lot of annoying little colds. But all those holiday carb cycles seem to have helped out there. My hormonal balances are goofed up. Restricted calorie, low-carb dieting over long periods of time can wreak havoc with thyroid, cortisol, HGH, IGF-1, leptin, testosterone and estrogen, and so on. High-carb, caloric-balance breaks can help alleviate these problems, but not settle them entirely.

Happily, my weight loss did not entail excessively high lean body mass loss rates. Overall, it looks like my LBM-to-BW Loss Ratio is around 23% to 24%. That is, for every 100 pounds of bodyweight I lost, I only lost 23 or 24 pounds of LBM. People who follow sensible weight loss regimens usually see loss ratios of 25% to 30%. People who follow starvation diets or foolish crash diets see loss rates of 40% to 50%. While my upper body is pretty slender for a man of my size, that is an artifact of family genetics and lifelong lack of training. I can't fix the genetics, but I can fix the training.

So, all in all, while I am run down a bit by my fat loss regimen, I haven't done too badly. As I transition now to caloric balance, using a roughly isocaloric diet of P:C:F::3:3:4 my body will recover from an extended period of what it regarded as starvation. And once I am through the transition, I will be able to switch to an athletic training diet and caloric surplus which will enable more vigorous training. My body will still be recovering, and I am an older guy, so I will ramp up the volume, intensity, and frequency slowly; but I will ramp it up.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:36 AM   #1420
Rebecca Roth
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Well, if my BFC is lower than yours, take mine and add about 7%. That is roughly the difference between men and women. If I was a lean and healthy man, I would be around 15% BFC. For a woman, the equivalent would be around 22%. So taking my current BFC of 25% and adding 7% yields 32%. If your BFC is lower than that, then you are ahead of me in terms of losing fat and leaning out.
Right well, I'm very aware of the differences in healthy BF for men and women, however as I mentioned, I've been fully involved in CF for a couple years at this point, so I have certainly done it at a relative bf% comparable to yours currently.

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Now, as for your BMI matching mine, it sounds to me that after two years of CrossFit, you have built up enough muscle and bone density to skew the BMI number quite a bit. That often happens with people who exercise a lot. George W. Bush and Barrack Obama both have BMIs that technically qualify them as "Overweight". Obviously, neither of those men are chubby. What they have is lots of dense muscle and bone tissue, which skews the BMI number. This is why I consider BMI one of the least reliable metrics. I note it, but I don't take it too seriously.

My guess is that while your BMI says you are on the theshold between "Overweight" and "Obese" and your BFC says you are a bit overfat, that you don't show much fat though you do have some firm curves thanks to being well muscled.
And you would be wrong. I'm still the "fat kid" at my gym. I've certainly improved musculature, lost quite a bit of weight, etc. However I am still overfat, and making progress at losing that remains slow. Again, commenting on the mental aspect here, that I think you are underestimating yourself. You are at this point pretty psychically average, comparable to a normal person starting out at cf, not many people actually start at 15% BF. Personally, I'm certainly large frame, so I'm well aware of how poor an indicator BMI can be, I will not likely ever reach a "healthy" BMI in the future.

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I still show my fat, though not nearly as much as I once did. My Waist Measurement is almost 39 inches, so that is still a fair sized belly. Lower body musculature is decent, but that is expected after all these decades of hauling around a built-in 200 pound weight vest. My upper body is quite slender, with small musculature. Take a look at one of my Sunday reports and note the small arm and neck measurements. My chest measurement is OK, but that is because of a large ribcage - a family inheritance - not big chest and back muscles.

I understand the point you are trying to make with your comparison, and I address this further on in the post. Though the BMI says our physiques are roughly the same, clearly they are not. I have been dieting hard for nearly two years, while you have been exercising hard for two years. I am guessing I began at a far higher level of obesity than you ever did. When I began, my BFC was 49%, which would be roughly 56% for a woman. So, we began from very different different places, and took distinctly different paths to get where we are today. Is it any wonder there is a disparity in results?
When I began my BF was not perfectly accurately measured, but it was measured at 51% via BIA. So yes, yours was higher, but again, feel like you are underestimating yourself. I was drastically under-muscled, and did spent the first year gaining strength/recomp trying to just be healthy, losing no weight (- about 5lb, BF via BIA at 42%), but then started moving into serious dieting after that first year and have been most of the time since.


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Originally Posted by Luke Seubert View Post
Great question, Rebecca. I think the answer is a little bit of both - I have been sandbagging it, some of it necessary while some of it my own reluctant hangups. But at the same time, the severity of my loss has left me built a little differently.

First, let me address the necessary sandbagging. When I began at 426 pounds of bodyweight and 49% BFC, I made a very conscientious decision to take that weight off as rapidly as possible to the exclusion of all else. Now, rapid fat loss requires severe caloric deficits. Back in May of 2011, my Basal Metabolic Rate was around 4,100 calories per day. My dietary intake was 1,800 calories per day. With energy needs that high and calories so few, the weight flew off. But so few calories precluded rigorous exercise. In July, 2012 my BMR had dropped to around 3,650 calories per day, while my diet was running about 1,950. Not as huge a caloric deficit, but still a big one. I had ramped up the exercise somewhat, but by early October I had increased it too much and crashed and burned. I took some time off, and began taking more frequent high-carb, caloric-balance breaks. My rate of weight loss has slowed considerably as a result. And yet, my ability to exercise hard is less than it was in the Spring of 2011. My metabolism and recovery capacity are run down quite a bit. (I am currently estimating my latest BMR - I think it is in the low 3,000's now.) This is the main reason I am suspending fat loss for the Winter and pursuing more intense workouts. I need the break.
I can certainly understand the burnout involved, but again, I've run severe calorie restriction while also doing CF (I am currently, not for the first time). It definitely makes volume and recovery harder, but its doable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Seubert View Post
Rebecca, if you spend any time in the CrossFit Nutrition sub-forum, you'll become familiar with a very common thread. Somebody posts how they recently began CrossFit and a diet, usually low-carb Paleo, and after a few weeks they feel like crap and they don't know what's wrong. Invariably, the wise old hands tell them to eat more food because they just aren't taking in enough calories to sustain that much work. That pretty much describes me for the past 90 weeks. Too few calories for hard exercise. So have I been sandbagging it on the exercise? Yes. Most definitely. Out of physiological necessity.

But I have also been sandbagging it from my own quirky little reluctant hangups. Last October's crash and burn really hit me hard, and it has left me a bit gunshy about pushing the exercise regimen hard. This is a silly hangup which I am just going to have to break. And the sandbag work, oddly, is a way of doing this. Hauling an 80 pound sandbag up and down hills for one mile is a lot tougher than brisk walking three miles, which was my previous conditioning workout. The only reason I have been able to do this is because I am eating at close to caloric balance right now, with much more carbs and fat than I have been eating in the past.

Also, now that my BFC is down to a more manageable level, the tactics change. When I was morbidly obese, I used an unusual and in some ways extreme diet and exercise regimen. Most diets are for people who need to lose 30 pounds, not 230 pounds. Consequently, normal diets don't work for the morbidly obese, who have very different biochemistries and metabolisms from people who are merely overweight or slightly obese. But now I have a mere 30 or 40 pounds to lose. The sorts of diets appropriate for "little people" are now appropriate for me.

But wrapping my head around this reality is a tough mental barrier for me. Dropping 190+ pounds in 90 weeks requires a tremendous amount of stubborn discipline and narrowly-focused drive, week after week, month after month, a never ending daily grind. But now, all of a sudden, all that needs to end. Now, all of a sudden, I am eating a balanced caloric diet and my bodyweight is steady. I eat three meals a day, and because they are normal meals, I feel absolutely stuffed. And that, despite the fact that I am skewing towards high-energy density fats and carbs to ease this transition. If I was eating more stomach-stretching fruits and veggies and less fat and carb-dense starches, like I will be in the coming weeks, I would really be in huge trouble. And here I am, planning to undertake strength training in the coming months, which will require me to eat even more! How do I wrap my head around THAT?!?

Anyway, dealing with these mental hangups is part of this transition phase I am going through, a necessary albeit turbulent part of my lose-fat and get-fit journey.

Here you finally hit on my point, you are on a cf forum, so clearly it was in your sights at least originally; you've now reached the point where there are no real physical barriers from "normal" activity of crossfit... you are just mentally unprepared. I can certainly understand, especially after going through an extremely restricted diet, but my worry is that you are psyching yourself out or delaying your start, rather than making progress. at your current weight & training level talking about 3 miles of brisk walking as a potential workout is just silly, but I think you haven't got your head around where you actually are physically. Hence my curiosity about pictures, that tends to be the major turning point for many people, when they finally recognize the difference and begin to process acceptance.
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