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Old 12-07-2012, 05:03 PM   #1301
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik Nichols View Post
WOW Luke! Congrats for breaking 240! There is the results of all your dedication to diet and comitment to it all. Great work.
Thanks, but it is my second time breaking under 240. I did it the first time back in early November, and by November 15 I had hit 236.4. The extended Thanksgiving carb up pulled me back about 240 by quite a bit, and it has been a dogfight ever since to get it back down. Right now I am at 237.0, so I haven't even gotten back to my previous low. Although, that said, I would not be surprised if I broke under 236.4 sometime over the weekend.

I ran the numbers and for the past nine weeks I have seen the slowest weight loss rates I have ever recorded. It has been worse that even last Winter, in February and March, when I hit rock bottom the first time.

This, combined with my now-too-frequent bouts with mild colds or some other minor malady, is what has convinced me to shut down the fat loss come January. I cringe to think how miserable and wretchedly slow an experience THAT would be, trying to lose fat for the second Winter in a row.

And just to whine a little bit more, as happy as I am to be going back under 240; I will likely go back above 240 yet again next year. When I shut down the fat loss regimen come mid-January, 2013 and go with a caloric-balance, high-carb diet; I will likely add about 10 to 12 pounds of water and glycogen, maybe more. Unless I am well under 225 when that happens, I'll probably spike back up above 240 at some point. And the chances of my peeling off enough fat to get under 225 in the next 5 1/2 weeks aren't very good at all. So as much trouble as getting under 240 has been, I'm going to be back above it for quite a while - almost all of the first half of 2013.

Like I said, this has been a tough nine weeks. Pushing through these repeated setbacks and slow weight loss rates has been psychologically tougher than usual, because I know there is going to be a sort of "reversal" of what little progress I have made lately come early 2013. Me done whining now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik Nichols View Post
Oh and I have been working on the ''Fix my back'' work and, man can I feel it in the back side! Thanks.
I'm glad you found that workout routine to be of help. The Founder is a very interesting exercise, and it does have some tougher variations that allow you to build it up over time through progression. Between that, the Stuart McGill core work, and the LYTP exercises; you should be able to rehabilitate your back quite effectively.
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:18 AM   #1302
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Saturday Weekly Body Measurements Update
Date: December 8, 2012

Last Week's Total Body Measurement: 751.3 cm
This Week's Total Body Measurement: 743.8 cm
Beginning Date for Body Measurements - May 14, 2011 - Total Body Measurements: 1009.5 cm
Total Centimeters Lost to Date: 265.8 cm
Total Percentage Lost to Date: 26.3%

Comments
This will be my last "Saturday Weekly Body Measurements Update". I will continue taking my weekly body measurements. And I will continue posting this information each week. However, I will move everything over to a unified post made each Sunday. This will include the Body Measurements, LBM, BFC, and Bodyweight updates - all simplified and consolidated into one weekly update.

Anyway, that aside, I continued to see good results in my Body Measurements this past week. I lost 7.5 cm in Total Body Measurements, including a nice 1.5 cm drop in my waist measurement along with various small drops in my limb measurements.

Meanwhile, my Bodyweight continues to drop briskly, faster than I thought it would - down to 233.4 lbs as of this morning. I was more carbed up than I had supposed. My Omron BFC readings are still a bit on the middlin' to high side, but I expect them to start dropping smartly soon, in accordance with the decreasing waist measurement.

Body Measurements for Last Week and This Week
An explanation about "Total Body Measurements" and how I use body measurements to assess fat loss over time may be found in my previous post, "The Humble Tape Measure: Simple But Oh So Useful" (WFS). The first number is last week's measurement, while the second number is this week's measurement. The "Initial" measurements in parentheses in the tables below are from mid-May, 2011 when I began my fat loss regimen.

Right Thigh: 54.0 cm, 53.0 cm (Initial: 71.5 cm)
Right Calf: 42.0 cm, 42.0 cm (Initial: 53.0 cm)
Right Ankle: 24.0 cm, 24.0 cm (Initial: 29.5 cm)

Left Thigh: 56.0 cm, 54.5 cm (Initial: 75.0 cm)
Left Calf: 43.0 cm, 42.5 cm (Initial: 54.0 cm)
Left Ankle: 23.5 cm, 23.5 cm (Initial: 30.0 cm)

Right Arm: 30.5 cm, 30.0 cm (Initial: 39.5 cm)
Right Forearm: 28.5 cm, 28.0 cm (Initial: 35.5 cm)
Right Wrist: 17.5 cm, 17.0 cm (Initial: 21.0 cm)

Left Arm: 33.0 cm, 32.5 cm (Initial: 45.0 cm)
Left Forearm: 28.5 cm, 28.0 cm (Initial: 36.5 cm)
Left Wrist: 17.0 cm, 17.0 cm (Initial: 20.5 cm)

Neck: 36.8 cm, 36.8 cm (Initial: 47.5 cm)
Chest: 109.5 cm, 109 cm (Initial: 151.0 cm)
Waist: 104.0 cm, 102.5 cm (Initial: 169.0 cm)
Hips: 103.5 cm, 103.5 cm (Initial: 131.5 cm)
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:21 AM   #1303
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Sounds like you have a well thought out eating plan there, Luke - not just your success to date, but your perspective on the challenges of continuing with a ketogenic diet through mid-winter. It's definitely a good time to build strength and muscle mass as a way of improving BFC. When you are done, you may find that you have a new notion of your ideal bodyweight. As you've indicated, your strength numbers aren't great for somebody of your size, so there's probably plenty of room to build muscle and strength, raising your metabolic rate, and helping with your goals from the other direction.

Have you looked into Kiefer's version of carb cycling? You seem to be approaching things with that sort of perspective, but I was wondering that if there might be a shorter-term cycle that would work for you after what is certainly a well-earned and probably a necessary longer-term break from ketosis.

Keep up the good work and detailed logging. Lots of really good work and thought here.
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Old 12-08-2012, 06:53 AM   #1304
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Diary of Decades and Days - Bodyweight Trend Losses
The table below shows how many days it has taken me to lose each decade, that is, 10 pounds. These numbers are based upon my Bodyweight Trend, which is a more reliable way of tracking changes in bodyweight over time.

Anyway, as one can readily see, in the early days back in May and June of 2011, I could rip off 10 pounds of weight with exceptional speed - just a little over two weeks. In time, that pace slowed up a bit, requiring around 24 to 28 days to lose 10 pounds.

Then, Winter came and my loss rates got really slow. What once took me just over two weeks to lose in bodyweight now required around six or seven weeks. By early summer of 2012 though, I was back in the swing of things, peeling off the decades almost as fast as I did in the good old days. I took a two-week, high-carb, caloric-balance break after that, which slowed my progress, but I sped upon once again beginning this past September.

But the last decade, from 250 to 240, has been miserable. 61 days - almost nine weeks - to lose a measly 10 pounds! A series of short high-carb breaks and various other setbacks account for this, as well as just generally slower loss rates over time. The leaner I get, the more slowly I lose fat. Anyway, this last decade has been a real dog fight and I am glad to be done with it.

Number of Days to Lose Each Decade
  • 426 --> 420 - 08 days from May 04, 2011 to May 12, 2011
  • 420 --> 410 - 17 days from May 12, 2011 to May 29, 2011
  • 410 --> 400 - 17 days from May 29, 2011 to Jun 16, 2011
  • 400 --> 390 - 16 days from Jun 16, 2011 to Jul 01, 2011
  • 390 --> 380 - 21 days from Jul 01, 2011 to Jul 22, 2011
  • 380 --> 370 - 24 days from Jul 22, 2011 to Aug 15, 2011
  • 370 --> 360 - 26 days from Aug 15, 2011 to Sep 10, 2011
  • 360 --> 350 - 27 days from Sep 10, 2011 to Oct 07, 2011
  • 350 --> 340 - 28 days from Oct 07, 2011 to Nov 11, 2011
  • 340 --> 330 - 41 days from Nov 11, 2011 to Dec 15, 2011
  • 330 --> 320 - 52 days from Dec 15, 2011 to Feb 05, 2012
  • 320 --> 310 - 38 days from Feb 05, 2012 to Mar 14, 2012
  • 310 --> 300 - 40 days from Mar 14, 2012 to Apr 23, 2012
  • 300 --> 290 - 48 days from Apr 23, 2012 to Jun 10, 2012
  • 290 --> 280 - 18 days from Jun 10, 2012 to Jun 28, 2012
  • 280 --> 270 - 20 days from Jun 28, 2012 to Jul 18, 2012
  • 270 --> 260 - 54 days from Jul 18, 2012 to Sep 10, 2012
  • 260 --> 250 - 28 days from Sept 10, 2012 to Oct 08, 2012
  • 250 --> 240 - 61 days from Oct 08, 2012 to Dec 08, 2012
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:46 AM   #1305
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

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Originally Posted by Patrick Haskell View Post
Sounds like you have a well thought out eating plan there, Luke - not just your success to date, but your perspective on the challenges of continuing with a ketogenic diet through mid-winter. It's definitely a good time to build strength and muscle mass as a way of improving BFC. When you are done, you may find that you have a new notion of your ideal bodyweight. As you've indicated, your strength numbers aren't great for somebody of your size, so there's probably plenty of room to build muscle and strength, raising your metabolic rate, and helping with your goals from the other direction.
Thanks for your comments and support, Patrick, I appreciate it.

Yeah, trying to push two full years of a carb-cycled, ketogenic diet through another winter is just too much. I have the willpower for it, but I don't think it would be at all good for my body.

You are right that my ideas of ideal bodyweight are going to change, likely going upwards. Bear in mind that my BFC estimation methods, while consistent and reasonable, are also crude and inaccurate. I could very well be carrying more Lean Body Mass than my numbers show.

And while you are right that I will be adding muscle with proper nutrition and training over this coming winter, adding muscle isn't a great way to change BFC. The best way to lower BFC is to lose fat - no contest.

That said, taking a fat-loss timeout to build some muscle and better overall fitness is a good thing, and it can't hurt. While my goal will be to hold my fat body mass steady (or see a slight increase but only with significant muscle mass increases), I do expect my BFC to improve a bit over the winter as I build some muscle mass.

However, this is not going to be an all out, hard-core, muscle-building phase. Adding lots of muscle rapidly almost always requires adding lots of fat, which I do not want to do at all. I could add lots of muscle without adding lots of fat by following the mass building variant of Lyle McDonald's "Ultimate Diet 2.0", but that is an extremely demanding dietary regimen, and I need a break from really stringent diet discipline for a while. Modest discipline is OK, but nothing really tough.

Instead of big muscle mass building, my goal this winter is going to be "active recovery". That is, recovery from nearly two years of moderated chronic starvation. I need to build up my fitness. My ability to exercise hard has declined significantly from last Fall, and even this past Spring. My body has worn down and I am wrung out. It is something I can't explain or even demonstrate with all those numbers I love so much - it is something that I feel.

Sure, it would be cool to lift lots of heavy weights and run lots of intervals and stuff like that, but I need to build up to that sort of thing. And I need to rebuild and normalize my metabolism and endocrine system, getting my biochemistry back to something near normal. My two-week, high-carb, caloric-balance breaks helped a lot; but I need a longer break to really recover.

So, while I will be lifting weights and working on intervals and all sorts of things, I will progress in a conservative and somewhat slow fashion. Before I can really build lots of muscle and metcon capacity, I first have to recover to a decent base level of fitness. Suddenly switching from losing bodyweight rapidly over a long time period, including significant muscle mass losses, to a hard core muscle mass gaining regimen; would be too much of a shock to my system. Pushing hard for the big muscle mass gains and impressive metcon standards will have to wait for a later day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Haskell View Post
Have you looked into Kiefer's version of carb cycling? You seem to be approaching things with that sort of perspective, but I was wondering that if there might be a shorter-term cycle that would work for you after what is certainly a well-earned and probably a necessary longer-term break from ketosis.

Keep up the good work and detailed logging. Lots of really good work and thought here.
If by "Kiefer's version of carb cycling" you are referring to carb-backloading, yes, I am familiar with the idea and have used it to a limited degree.

I like carb-backloading and I feel better after a strength training workout and recover better over the next day or so if I carb-backload. I think the idea has merit.

That said, carb-backloading, while an elegant hypothesis; is still a new idea and it hasn't really been well tested scientifically yet. Consuming both carbs and proteins immediately after a strength workout to speed recovery time has been demonstrated to be effective in studies, but that is a simplistic form of carb backloading.

For myself, and likely for many people, I think that rigorous exercise requires generous quantities of carbohydrates in the diet; although not excessive amounts. (Some people - like the Inuit, Aleuts, and Laplanders who live near the Arctic Circle and consume 90% of their calories from protein and fat - are adapted to very low-carb diets yet can sustain rigorous physical activity. Most of us aren't Eskimos though.) Having attempted many times to exercise both rigorously and frequently while on a low-carb ketogenic diet and having failed repeatedly, I have come to appreciate the necessity of moderate to high carb intake in support of hard exercise.

I'm not nearly the anti-carb zealot I was when I first began my fat loss regimen, although that zealotry did help me out quite a lot in those early days, and given my condition it was appropriate for that time. But as I have leaned out and gotten more fit, through personal experience and continued research, I now appreciate the wisdom of a balanced approach to carb-intake levels.
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Old 12-08-2012, 10:10 AM   #1306
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Shout Out To My Peeps
It's been a while since I last did this, so I just wanted to say thanks to all the folks who have posted to my Workout Log. There have been some new posters over the past few months, so I would like to acknowledge their recent contributions along with everyone who has posted in the past.

I really do appreciate all the encouragement and support. It has helped me immensely as I continue grinding on. I also appreciate all the suggestions and advice, some of which has proven exceptionally useful for me and others as well. For example, my recent post, Fixing My Back - Posterior Chain, Body Core, Upper Back & Shoulder Exercise Regimen (WFS), seems to have helped a number of folks with similar issues. But it was Greg Pack and Arturo Garcia, frequent posters to this Log, who first clued me in to these vital information resources.

Anyway, following is a list of everyone who has ever posted to my Workout Log along with a comment or two they made when they dropped by to say, "Hello." My thanks to each and every one of you. And feel free to drop by again anytime.

Nik Nichols from Quinlan, TX, USA
"Hi ya, Luke, Welcome to the logs. I will watch out for your posts. It will be intresting to see how you do. Looks like you are well on your way. I hope you stick to it and stay consistant with it."

Brady Herrin from Royse City, TX, USA
"Really interested to follow your progress. Definitely subscribing. Good luck, God bless!"

Arturo Garcia from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
"I'll keep checking here and give the "support" you're seeking for in any way I can. So far you seem to be doing GREAT. So please keep at it."

Jason David from St Claire Shores, MI, USA
"Hey Luke! I started at 40+ % bodyfat as well...stick with what you are doing and you'll be fine. CrossFit and the diet recommendation works. I've encountered just about every stumbling block a fatty can have. Let me know if you have any questions..."

Dustin Standel from Groton, CT, USA
"Thank you for your time and effort in this log."

Mara Rozitis from Ste. Anne, MB, Canada
"Thanks for sharing your journey here, Luke. It is certainly inspiring."

Jay Rhodes from Stoney Creek, ON, Canada
"Just had a quick look through your log. Great stuff man, I applaud you for creating change in your life.
So far, it looks like everything is moving in the right direction brother! I look forward to keeping up with your progress."

Xavier Berges from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
"After reading through you're thread this is really amazing and inspiring. Your level of dedication and meticulous planning is amazing. I really like reading through threads like these because it gives me a heap of motivation and makes me want to wish you to continue at your best and improve yourself. Thank you for the inspiration, I will definitively follow your thread and try to give the knowledge and motivation that I can!!"

Vickie Ellickson from Spokane, WA, USA
"Thanks for sharing your progress! I've been checking on your blog and have been really impressed by your statistical approach."

Meghan Reid from Philadelphia, PA, USA
"It's been enlightening and refreshing to read your log, Luke. I really admire your discipline in recording workouts and in getting through them on your own. I'm sure there are a million points during those long walks that you want to just stop and head home, but the fact that you don't is really admirable.

Also, I'm really gunning for you to keep this up, because I think your log is already a fantastic resource for training someone who is REALLY out of shape. Many of us here are pretty well-trained compared to the majority of the population, and we forget that there are indeed people out there who get sore from 10 air squats. Not a bad thing, it's just a point on the way to a future goal. I'm hoping to glean some ideas from your workouts to pass on to my mom who is now at a healthy weight through diet but needs to get exercising."

Helen M Brennan from Coominya, Queenland, Australia
"i have just read thru this thread from the beginning... all i can say is that i am in awe of your achievements and your common sense attitude... the one step at a time approach is by far the most successful but difficult to in these days of everything being expected to be rapid not to mention without much exercise on your part. i am so impressed keep up the inspirational progress"

Zane Jones from New Albany, OH, USA
"Just found this thread! Way to go. Keep it up."

Greg Pack from Birmingham, AL, USA
"Hi Luke, I found this workout log while surfing around. Congratulations on your success and continued dedication to the worthy cause. I wish I had found it earlier in your journey."

Jesse Hein from Santa Clara, CA, USA
"Luke, I wanted to thank you for posting your log and ideas. Six weeks ago I started researching losing weight and came across your thread. I've found your information both helpful and useful. While I had only 70 pounds to lose I found your weight loss encouraging. I started tracking both my weight daily (with both a 7 day average and the moving average as described in the Hacker's Diet) but due mainly to your log I also started tracking my body measurements weekly.

I made the change in both diet and adding in body weight exercises. If not for your suggestion of measurements I would be very discouraged as I haven't lost a single pound in 6 weeks. In fact, this past week it looks like I'm track to gain a pound (in my average I mean, daily fluctuates as always.) But tracking my measurements shows that I've lost an estimated 18 pounds of fat. Boy does that number look a lot better then 0 change!

Anyway, I just felt I owed you thanks for taking the time to write up your progress AND information about the how and why. It has helped considerably."

Colleen Quigley from London, Ontario, Canada
"Awesome tracking."

Mike Johnson from Phoenix, AZ, USA
"Hey Luke, just wanted to stop in and say keep up the good work. I enjoy reading about your progress and your color analysis. You've given me a lot to think about even though our backgrounds are quite different so thank you."

Milton Brisson from Calgary, AB, Canada
"Hey Luke, I have looked in periodically, and I have been impressed with your discipline and dedication. I thought that by with all of the stats you were keeping, and the frequency of weigh-ins you did, that you could become obsessed and frustrated....I know I would have - but thats just me I guess!

Any way, this is showing that, since May 4th - you have lost almost 100#!!!!! What you are doing is obviously working! I am impressed beyond words at what you have been able to accomplish!!!!! You will undoubtably reach all the goals that you set out for!!!! Keep up the great work!"

Sarah Isel from Chicago, IL, USA
"I feel this is an opportune time to tell you how much I love reading your log! My mom has lost 50 pounds by going 90% or so paleo. I am going to direct her to your log for inspiration to keep going! I look forward to reading more about your journey. Great work losing those 100 pounds!!! And right before the new year too!!"

Renata Speranza from Thalwil, Switzerland
"But as you said, you can't coach desire... Thanks again for your post. I am also reading your "odyssey-log". It's great. Kind regards from Switzerland."

Andrew Ewell from Philadelphia, PA, USA
"Luke, congrats on all of the progress. I appreciate your scentific approach to your fitness goals. I will be watching out for your posts to track it and see how you are doing. You will be freaking dangerous when you reach your goal... Keep it up. You're the man"

Justin Bond from Bristol, Rhode Island, USA
"Congratulations on the progress! I got into Crossfit briefly last summer and read your log back then. It makes me happy to see that a year later you're still at it and have reached the 150 pounds goal!"

Larry Bruce from Toronto, Ontario, Canada
"Great job with your log and your progress! Admire your progress and discipline."

Travious Goines from Manassas, VA, USA
"These numbers look good. I am not sure what my bmf percentage is but I do know that I went to the gym on Monday and did a hard workout and I am feeling pretty good."

Rebecca Roth from Saint Louis, MO, USA
"I both LOVE and hate checking in to your log. I love seeing your amazing progress, but darnit you make me jealous that mine has been a lot slower!

Clearly you've put in the hard work to get where you are now, It's great to see all the detailed records you've maintained. Keep up the awesome work & maintain!"

Mark Jeffreys from San Diego, CA, USA
"Luke, great job on the weight loss. Iím in a similar situation and am about halfway to my goal after weighing 412lbs 12 months ago."

Eric Shuty from Federal Way, WA, USA
"Hey bro, just wanted to say that I find your overall progress, meticulous logging, and specific goal setting to be very impressive. Keep up the good work!!"

Faisal Tuddy, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK
"Luke, I've been following your log for about a month, and its inspirational keep up the good work, I love the detailed meticulous logging. Great Job!"

Patrick Haskell from Winchendon, MA, USA
"Just saw this post of yours linked on Nik's log and wanted to give props for the research. I've been a fan of Stuart McGill for a long while and have seen the LTYP in my own PT, but the founder exercises are quite interesting and look like they will help with some issues I've been working on. Thanks for sharing."
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:39 PM   #1307
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Seubert View Post
Yeah, trying to push two full years of a carb-cycled, ketogenic diet through another winter is just too much. I have the willpower for it, but I don't think it would be at all good for my body.
...
Instead of big muscle mass building, my goal this winter is going to be "active recovery". That is, recovery from nearly two years of moderated chronic starvation. I need to build up my fitness. My ability to exercise hard has declined significantly from last Fall, and even this past Spring. My body has worn down and I am wrung out. It is something I can't explain or even demonstrate with all those numbers I love so much - it is something that I feel.
...
Sure, it would be cool to lift lots of heavy weights and run lots of intervals and stuff like that, but I need to build up to that sort of thing. And I need to rebuild and normalize my metabolism and endocrine system, getting my biochemistry back to something near normal. My two-week, high-carb, caloric-balance breaks helped a lot; but I need a longer break to really recover.
Your sense of perspective and self-awareness is remarkable, Luke. You've reached a point in your weight loss where 99% of folks would grow frustrated, bang their heads against the wall trying what has worked to date, and probably regress, but you're changing course in what I think is a very intelligent way. Major props.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Seubert View Post
If by "Kiefer's version of carb cycling" you are referring to carb-backloading, yes, I am familiar with the idea and have used it to a limited degree.

I like carb-backloading and I feel better after a strength training workout and recover better over the next day or so if I carb-backload. I think the idea has merit.

That said, carb-backloading, while an elegant hypothesis; is still a new idea and it hasn't really been well tested scientifically yet. Consuming both carbs and proteins immediately after a strength workout to speed recovery time has been demonstrated to be effective in studies, but that is a simplistic form of carb backloading.
Kiefer also developed the notion of "Carb Night," wherein not only is the post-workout window or late day feeding used on a daily cycle, but he worked a weekly (or semi-weekly) cycle wherein a ketogenic diet is broken-up to replenish glycogen and provide the boost needed to keep the metabolism churning and performance (and appearance - he works with lots of body builders) progressing. I wasn't thinking of this as a replacement for your current diet vacation, but rather as an option for tweaking your protocol if you stall out during the sunny time of year.

Kiefer was on Robb Wolf's podcast a couple weeks back discussing some of his throughts that extend beyond his published work. Figured you'd appreciate hearing his thought process, whether or not you integrate it into your plan someday.
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:42 PM   #1308
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

WOD - Walking Day
  • Date: December 8, 2012
Conditions
  • Temperature: 51 F
  • Windchill: 51 F
  • Humidity: 95%
Comments
Interesting results with today's walk. At 46:17 over 3.1 miles, this walk took me 2 seconds longer than yesterday's identical walk. Essentially, the times were the same. However, the heart rates were quite different. Yesterday's heart rate was 125 BPM, while today's was 137 BPM. Same walk, same time, yet today my heart had to pump a lot harder to get the job done. How come?

A modest clue might be found in the bodyweight readings over the past two days. Yesterday I weighed in at 237.0 pounds, while this morning it was 233.4, a loss of 3.6 pounds in one day. Obviously I am unloading yet more water and glycogen as I get deeper into ketosis. And as my stored glycogen reserves shrink, my heart has to pump the blood a bit faster to provide the energy needed to sustain exercise. If circulating glycogen supplies in my bloodstream are lower, one way to deliver a given amount of energy over a given time is to pump the blood faster. Well, that's my hypothesis anyway. I don't know if it is actually right or not, but it seems plausible.

Anyway, today's was a good, brisk walk. My bodyweight is dropping nicely, though my BFC has not yet begun to drop rapidly just yet. My body measurements are down, including the ever vital waist measurement, and things are cruising along at a good pace.

Walk - 3.1 Flat and Hilly Miles - 5k (Current PR - 42:58 @ 125 BPM on 11/21/12, 4.33 MPH)
  • Time: 46:17
  • Heart Rate: 137 BPM
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Old 12-08-2012, 04:57 PM   #1309
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Haskell View Post
Your sense of perspective and self-awareness is remarkable, Luke. You've reached a point in your weight loss where 99% of folks would grow frustrated, bang their heads against the wall trying what has worked to date, and probably regress, but you're changing course in what I think is a very intelligent way. Major props.
Thank you, Peter, I appreciate the compliment. My ability to change strategy in a beneficial way is a skill which circumstances have forced me to acquire over the past 84 weeks. On quite a number of occasions, I have experienced significant obstacles and setbacks in my progress. I treated them as a puzzle, and researched and experimented until I found a solution. In so doing, I have become steadily more knowledgeable and wise in how major, long-term, fat loss works. I have also grown steadily more confident in my ability to crush obstacles, as well as more confident in my own steadfast discipline and persistence. Nothing succeeds like success, as they say.

By way of amusing example, take a look at my griping and complaining in this old post from August 31, 2011 - in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene (WFS). Can you believe that silliness? I was forced off diet for a few days, and was all worked up over a 5 pound weight spike due to lack of exercise and less than optimal diet. But back then, I was still pretty early into the process, and worried about my ability to handle setbacks well. Since then, I have endured far worse and come through just fine. See the old post, The Winter Of My Discontent (WFS) for a good example. That post reveals one of my secrets to setback serenity - Insight Meditation.

But a 5 pound weight spike a calamity? HA! These days, I shrug off 14 pound weight spikes with nary a concern and rip it all back off in due time. I slugged my way through the depths of last Winter, and came out of it to rip off quite a lot of weight late this Spring, Summer, and now Fall; though not nearly as much as I had hoped for. If I could get through all that, I can handle anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Haskell View Post
Kiefer also developed the notion of "Carb Night," wherein not only is the post-workout window or late day feeding used on a daily cycle, but he worked a weekly (or semi-weekly) cycle wherein a ketogenic diet is broken-up to replenish glycogen and provide the boost needed to keep the metabolism churning and performance (and appearance - he works with lots of body builders) progressing. I wasn't thinking of this as a replacement for your current diet vacation, but rather as an option for tweaking your protocol if you stall out during the sunny time of year.

Kiefer was on Robb Wolf's podcast a couple weeks back discussing some of his throughts that extend beyond his published work. Figured you'd appreciate hearing his thought process, whether or not you integrate it into your plan someday.
Peter, I have Wolf's website bookmarked and have listened to a few of his podcasts. They are quite informative, though I found amusement in the one where he and some other guy spent ten minutes obsessing over their testosterone levels. It was funny listening to a pair of nerdy, pasty, white guys get all jacked up about their T readings and comparing them to other guys they knew, sort of like how gossipy school girls compare clothing and styling choices.

Anyway, I'll listen in on the Kiefer podcast. From your quick summary, it sounds vaguely similar to some ideas put forth by Rob Faigin and Lyle McDonald. They too advocate carb-cycled ketogenic diets, with several high carb days each week, and an emphasis on carbs later in the day. This, combined with a sensible PWO meal with a good blend of carbs and protein, makes a lot of sense to me.

However, as I mentioned earlier, there just isn't enough science and research yet on the effectiveness of carb backloading. And to the extent that carb backloading hype is used by supplement companies to push product, I am highly skeptical. However, in my own personal experience with severe caloric deficit, low-carb, ketogenic diets; I find that carb loading really helps during heavy workouts and later with recovery. For people on a more conventional diet with near caloric balance and normal macronutrient ratios, carb backloading might not be nearly as beneficial. Diet and exercise regimens suited for rapid fat loss are very different from diet and exercise regimens suited for heavy exercise. Likewise, diets can vary quite a lot to suit the needs of different people's unique metabolisms, biochemistries, and endocrine systems.
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:09 AM   #1310
Luke Seubert
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Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey

Sunday Lean Body Mass Update
  • Date: December 9, 2012

LBM Average 2 Weeks Ago: 180 lbs (Number skewed by high-carb diet break)
LBM Average 1 Week Ago: 176 lbs
Current LBM Average: 173 lbs

Comments
This is the last "Sunday Lean Body Mass Update" I will post here. I will still track LBM, indeed, I am tracking it daily now between my Omron BFC and Tape Measure & Formula BFC numbers which I measure and calculate every day. And I will still report on LBM once a week. However, that update will not focus on just LBM - it will be more general and inclusive. I will write up the new update and post it once a week on Sundays. I am changing all of my updates and reports and such in anticipation of the "New World Order" coming in January, wherein I won't be focusing on fat loss, but fat stabilization coupled with more exercise. This will require assessing different metrics and looking at things with a different point of view. The new Sunday update will help with that process. Anyway, on with the last of the LBM Updates....

New lows across the board everywhere! My LBM dropped to 173, below the usual 174 to 176 pounds I usually record during my low-carb diet phases. FBM is a new all time low at 62 pounds. BFC is tied for the all time low at 26.5%. Bodyweight is an all time low of 235.

While I wish my LBM had remained at 174 pounds, I can't complain too much. In the past 9 weeks I have lost 1 pound of LBM versus 10 pounds of fat. That is a simply superb 9% LBM-to-Bodyweight Loss Ratio. 25% to 30% is more the norm. Indeed, if anything, I would have gladly accepted more LBM losses for faster fat loss rates - better than a measly 1.1 pounds per week.

My BMI is now 29.6, well under the threshold of 30 which demarks Overweight from Obese. (25 is the BMI number demarking Normal from Overweight - for me that is 198.3 pounds.) I am now well and truly officially merely Overweight, albeit admittedly on the high side of Overweight. This is a vast, vast improvement from where I once was based on BMI, which was Class-2 Super-Obese with a BMI of 53.5.

Even more interesting are my raw Bodyweight numbers. That 235 Bodyweight listed above and in the table below is a 4-day rolling average. Rolling averages are good if the data points aren't changing too quickly, but my Bodyweight has been rocketing down very fast this week since I went into a very hard PSMF (Protein-Sparing Moderated Fast) early this week. (Think high-protein, very low-carb, low-fat.) As of this morning, my Bodyweight is 230.6 pounds (BMI = 29!), well below that 235 pound rolling average. Obviously a lot of this weight loss is water and glycogen, but some of it is fat and a little muscle. I'll take that. I have to rip off the water weight and glycogen to get into serious fat-burning ketosis. And watching the bodyweight numbers plummet also provides a welcome psychological boost.

The irony here is that earlier this week, right in this Workout Log, I was whinging to Nik and Patrick about the hard time I was having breaking under 240 pounds. And a few days later, I am on the cusp on busting under 230. While I was whinging, I was also getting mad and determined and I went thermonuclear on the diet and exercise with good results.

My plan going forward is to drive this as hard as I can for the next 5 1/2 weeks. I won't sustain these rapid weight loss rates, but I can go into one last hurrah of hardcore fat burning and drop some significant FBM. And at this point, I am willing to take some higher LBM loss rates to achieve this. I'll have plenty of time this coming Winter to slowly rebuild LBM. Right now, I just want to drop the bodyweight to a respectable level while I still can.

LBM Derived From Formula, Omron, And Their Average LBM
My Lean Body Mass computation is derived from two sources. The first is my daily BFC readings taken with my Omron HB-306, which is detailed in my previous post, How to Get Semi-Useful Body Fat Composition Data Out of a Bioelectrical Impedance Analyzer (WFS). The second is based upon several of my body measurements, as detailed in my previous post, A Quick Method of Computing Body Fat Composition (WFS). Neither of these two methods results in an LBM number which I regard as accurate. However, when the two are averaged together, they seem to produce a result that is reasonably close. This average is what I used in the table below.

Regardless, what I really pay attention to is changes in LBM over time. My current goal is for LBM to hold steady as I lose fat. By the way, BW = Bodyweight, BFC = Body Fat Composition, LBM = Lean Body Mass, FBM = Fat Body Mass, BMI = Body Mass Index, and FFMI = Fat-Free Mass Index.

____Date_________BW_______BFC______LBM_______FBM__ __BMI_____FFMI
Sun 10/07/12_____246 lbs_____29.2%_____174 lbs_____72 lbs_____30.9_____21.3
Sun 10/14/12_____243 lbs_____28.3%_____174 lbs_____69 lbs_____30.5_____21.3
Sun 10/21/12_____241 lbs_____27.9%_____174 lbs_____67 lbs_____30.3_____21.2
Sun 10/28/12_____242 lbs_____27.5%_____175 lbs_____67 lbs_____30.4_____21.4
Sun 11/04/12_____246 lbs_____27.4%_____178 lbs_____67 lbs_____30.9_____21.8 (Numbers skewed by high-carb diet break)
Sun 11/11/12_____239 lbs_____26.6%_____175 lbs_____64 lbs_____30.1_____21.5
Sun 11/18/12_____239 lbs_____26.5%_____176 lbs_____63 lbs_____30.1_____21.5
Sun 11/25/12_____248 lbs_____27.7%_____180 lbs_____69 lbs_____31.2_____22.0 (Numbers skewed by high-carb diet break)
Sun 12/02/12_____239 lbs_____26.6%_____176 lbs_____64 lbs_____30.1_____21.5
Sun 12/09/12_____235 lbs_____26.5%_____173 lbs_____62 lbs_____29.6_____21.1


BFC Table for Men
  • Essential Fat - 2% to 5%
  • Athletes - 6% to 13%
  • Fitness - 14% to 17%
  • Average - 18% to 24%
  • Obese - 25%+
BMI Table
  • Very severely underweight - Less than 15.0
  • Severely underweight - From 15.0 to 16.0
  • Underweight - From 16.0 to 18.5
  • Normal healthy weight - From 18.5 to 25
  • Overweight - From 25 to 30
  • Moderately obese - From 30 to 35
  • Severely obese - From 35 to 40
  • Very severely obese - Over 40
FFMI Table for Men
  • Slender with little muscle - 18
  • Slender with normal muscle - 20
  • Very Muscular - 22
  • Highest limit without use of anabolic steroids - 25
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