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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 05-07-2006, 05:16 PM   #1
Barry Cooper
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I did the 5x5 for 5/5 today, and noticed that I held a tight abdominal contraction for the whole movement, and that--combined with the 30 hyper situps I did in my warm-up--seemed to aggravate my nausea.

It got me to thinking. Logically, if nausea is a result of internal distress, could that stress be a direct result of muscular pressure on the internal viscera? Normally, in my mind, I think of Pukie being associated with max heart rate, but obviously if we are at max heart rate, we are also at maximum RESPIRATORY rate, meaning maximal diaphragmatic contractions, along--in all likelihood, the exercise physiologists may know this--with a number of other abdominal muscles.

It has long seemed to me that what gets me most are sustained movements involving high abdominal tension. You have to tense your abs to lift almost anything, and it's used in swings, pullups, cleans, deadlifts, etc.

It also seems to me it harder to get a good pull of air while the abs are contracted. If I tense my abs, then pull a lungful of air, I don't get as much as if I relax my muscles then continue. This may mean that I am not pulling in as much air while I'm stressing my abs as would be the case, for example, in running. Possibly. I may be wrong on that, but I may be right, and the concept may lead to productive thinking on the part of someone else.

It does seem to me that breathing squats do increase my lung capacity, and have enabled me to hold my breath longer when I've done them, in tandem with what I think Strossen calls Rader Pulls (him or John McCallum).

Greater lung capacity would seem to be something that would be in part a function of flexibility, and somewhat amenable to training, up to a point. I know I have room for growth.

In any event, I thought I would post these random thoughts on the chance they make sense to someone else.

I will add, too, that it would be interesting, at some point, to see if in fact nausea is a product of rhythmic pressure on the viscera, if that doesn't over time have an effect of keeping them soft and pliable, and consequently healthier, and if the feeling of being nauseated isn't actually GOOD for you. Obviously, actual vomit is likely damaging to your esphagous--at least over time--and to your teeth. Research on bulemics would likely provide good data on this.

The FEELING, though? I'm going to go out on a limb and call it a prospective systemic tonic, and attaining max heart rate on a regular basis the most useful exercise-related intervention currently available. Both ideas are fully improbable enough to be entirely true.
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Old 05-10-2006, 10:39 AM   #2
Barry Cooper
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You know, I get a lot of blank looks face to face, too. I guess this idea was some combination of brilliant, stupid, and incoherent.
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Old 05-10-2006, 10:56 AM   #3
Peter Queen
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“brilliant, stupid, and incoherent.”
Hey that's the stuff of geniuses.
:happy:

In any event, I think that if one were to tense their abdominals then the intake ratio of air will be inversly proportional due to the intensity of the pressure that is exherted on the stomach. Basically, I agree with your opinion. Case in point: if I tense my stomach muscles while wearing my air mask in a fire then I consume less air. However this factor is short lived due to the added activity of fighting the fire in the first place. Thus, stomach tightening becomes a handicap and not a bennefit because it would then cause to some degree stomach cramps.
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Old 05-10-2006, 10:59 AM   #4
Paul Findley
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Some related links:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/anaphylaxis/AN00221

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/run...arrhea/AN00376


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Old 05-10-2006, 01:28 PM   #5
Rene Renteria
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I don't think the causes of nausea are well understood. But some of them are alterations in the normal, rhythmic, muscular motions of the stomach and intestines. This includes stoppage of those motions, too, I think, where digestion maybe halts and food sits in your stomach longer than it "should", however the body determines that. (Other causes are sensory and more "in the brain", like migraines and head injury/concussion. One hypothesis with those I've heard is that ingested poisons can cause upsets to your senses, like loss of balance, and a good protective measure is to vomit instead of keeping it in the body, which is an evolutionary protective mechanism.)

So it seems more likely to me that the severe demands during intense exercise, which include huge oxygen and blood utilization by the skeletal muscles, cause disruptions in the proper functioning of the smooth muscle in the GI tract, which lead to nausea. In that sense, the nausea is a sure sign that one is "overtaxing" the systems to where resources necessary for basic functions have to be diverted to the skeletal muscles. Which is why pushing to Pukie shows you're going as hard as you can.

Whether the adaptations that occur to this (assuming they do) are good for you in the sense of being healthier or bad in the sense of having a less sensitive digestive system or something (whatever that means), I have no clue!

"What doesn't kill you makes you stronger"?

Best,
Rene'
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