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Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

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Old 09-06-2003, 03:24 PM   #11
Kelly Moore
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I had been following the discussions about this diet on crossfit for several months and decided to change my diet to be closer to paleo. I still have my nightly bowl of high fiber cereal at night (don't laugh, just wait til you become my age) with yogurt, and the occasional sandwich or rare cookie, but for the most part I'm eating meats, fruits, nuts and vegetables. Big change from my former diet! My housemate has commented that I'm looking thinner; but I am stronger and feel more "awake" than in the past. Of course, that could also be from these crossfit workouts!

Anyway, I'm pleased with the results and the only thing I may need to do is increase the calories. Oh darn, might have to eat more steak or salmon or pecans... :-)
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Old 09-08-2003, 12:14 PM   #12
Robert Wolf
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Roy-

The etiology is not based soley upon GI. Several factors are at work here. A large GI will typically weild a high blood sugar and a rusultant high insulin level. The arguement then by most in the mainstream is to have low GI carbs to supply a constant but low level of glucose. My problem with this is if one graphs concentration of blood blucose over time and integrates this ( finds the total amount of glucose) one is left with over all a high level of glood glucose AND insulin. This situation will not produce syndome X features like diabetes, CVD etc. as quickly as the high GI frequent feeding plan but it will eventually.

Checking the GI databases I found "whole wheat bread" ranging from 65 to 99. Both of which bring a significant glycemic load to the situation. Glycemic load is GI X carb (digestible) content in a ten gram serving. This ends up making the glycemic load of bread, rice pasta quite high in comparison to most fruits and vegetables (there are notable exceptions such as bananas, driet fruit, and dates to name a few).

Like I said previously if this eating plan works for you that is really the bottom line. I do think however that swapping out some of the dense carb sources and adding more fat and a few non starchy veggies will imediately improve both performance and body composistion. You will almost certianly feel like crap for the better part of a week and it will require some effort to add the additional fat.
Robb
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Old 09-10-2003, 10:22 AM   #13
Alexander Karatis
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Fruit is a complex carb??!!! I'm really stunned here, as i thought that anything non-refined will be basically sugars (simple carbs), and the more refined it is (rice, pasta) the more complex.

Why do we want complex Vs simple carbs though anyway??
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Old 09-10-2003, 01:08 PM   #14
Robert Wolf
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This is an important and complicated point. "Simple" carbohydrates typicly refers to mono and dicsacharides such as glucose(mono) sucrose(di) fructose(mono) lactose(di) etc. "Complex" carbohydrates typicaly refers to carbohydrate polymers or strings in which a sugar such as glucose is esterified(linked together like beads on a necklace) many, many times. Glucoes which is alpha linked in this manner is what we call bread, rice, pasta etc. Glucose which is beta linked in this manner is what we call wood. Refining a complex carbohydrate typically breaks long pieces of carbohydrates into smaller pieces which increases the surface area available for enzymatic action thus increasing the rate of absorption and consequently blood sugar levles and a responsive insulin spike.

Fruit tends to be predominantly simple sugars and fiber but it tends to pack a low glycemic load,I explained glycemic load elsewhere in this thread, so fruit and low glycemic load foods tend to produce OVERALL less of a change in blood glucose and insulin levels. This is fairly relative from person to person and for me my tollerance for any type of dense carb source, be it fruit or potatos, is pretty low.

This is not quantum mechanics but it is somwhat complex and soundbite type information ALWAYS raises an exception which can cause a mountain of confusion. The Crossfit Journal dealing with glycemic index and nutrition flesh's out these concepts further as do the commonly refrenced books The Zone, Natural Hormonal Enhancement, Lights Out: Sleep, Sugar, and survival.

Once a firm grasp of these basic nutrition concepts is attained the ability to rationally modify ones diet is in sight.
Robb
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Old 09-13-2003, 01:30 AM   #15
Alexander Karatis
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Very helpful response Robert. I thank you for it.:happy:
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Old 09-13-2003, 10:55 AM   #16
Kevin Roddy
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Also, fruit is what is called an "insulin-independant" monosachharide. This means that it is converted to glucose without the utilization of insulin (or at least, not in large amounts), so it won't cause a crash, like sugar does.

In fact, fructose has been shown to facilitate the use of endogeneous lipid stores and lipid oxidation.

So, in other words, fruit is good. And highly delicious.
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Old 09-15-2003, 10:32 PM   #17
Robert Wolf
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Kevin-

Could you fill me in on a source for this? Im afraid I'm out of the loop on this as my understanding of fructose is that it is poorly converted to glucose, preferentially fills liver glycogen (over muscle) which leads to increased lipid synthesis as upossed to oxidation.

A standard practice for inducing type 2 diabetes in lab animals is to put them on a fructose drip and although life can be sustained on a mixture of protein, fat and glucose ( or just fat and protein) if fructose is consumed in adequate quantities metabolic derangement occurs to the point of death.

Everything I found on Medline seemed to say things along this line:

: Kobe J Med Sci. 2002 Dec;48(5-6):125-36. Related Articles, Links


Experimental studies on the role of fructose in the development of diabetic complications.

Sakai M, Oimomi M, Kasuga M.

Department of Internal Medicine, Takasago Municipal Hospital, 33-1 Kami-machi, Arai-cho, Takasago 676-0015, Japan.

We examined the role of fructose in the development of diabetic complications. Compared with glucose, fructose increased the fluorescence intensity and the cross-linking of glycated collagen, and promoted the polymerization of proteins. Therefore fructose accelerated the production of advanced glycation end-products more than glucose. In addition, fructose enhanced the reactive oxygen or oxygen radical generation and the associated degeneration of proteins and lipids. These actions of fructose appeared to be due to the formation of dicarbonyl compounds such as 3-deoxyglucosone, a highly reactive intermediate product formed in the advanced glycation stage. These results suggest that fructose is closely involved not only in glycation but also in the polyol pathway and peroxidation reactions through free radical formation. Thus, fructose is considered to be a more critical reducing sugar associated with the progression of diabetic complications than it has been thought until now.

Robb




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