CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Exercises
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-17-2005, 08:40 AM   #1
Bryan Edge
Member Bryan Edge is offline
 
Bryan Edge's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lynnwood  WA
Posts: 195
Hello!

I've been trying to practice L-sits on the dip bar at my gym, but I can't quite hit the 90 degree mark. I seem to be able to hit about 75 degrees (slightly below parallel) and I can only hold that for about 10 seconds.

Anyone have some advice for practicing/building my L-sit?

Also, I've gotten to the point where I can hold a planche (I think that's what it's called) with my knees on my elbows. I understand the next position to work on is to tuck the knees to the chest, but I can't hold that position for even a second it seems. I'm sure alot of it is just strength, but probably technique as well.

Thanks all! :-)
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 08:46 AM   #2
Chris Forbis
Member Chris Forbis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Joplin  Missouri
Posts: 922
Planche- Just keep on working it. Work the the knees on elbows for time, and just do reps of however long you can hold on the next progression.

L-sit- keep doing what you have been doing. Also, do lots of pike stretching. Inflexible hamstrings are the enemy of the l-sit.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 09:04 AM   #3
Guest
Departed Guest is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 1,095
For the L-sit, if you can't get to 90, I'd say work tucks (hold legs bent with upper leg at 90 or above). Then start working one bent leg, one straight, then move on to two straight legs. Two straight below 90 is putting some serious stress on your lower back.

Also make sure your hamstrings are flexible enough - if you can't easily get to 90 degrees + with an arch still in your lower back while standing, there's no way you'll hit that position on the bars.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 09:51 AM   #4
Christopher Sommer
Departed Christopher Sommer is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 225
If shoulder strength is an issue, a nice intermediate step to insert between the frog stand and the tuck planche is a "modified" tuck planche. Essentially this is simply a tuck planche where extra assistance is provided by resting your knees on your elbows, as in the frog stand, but with straight arms.

As far as the L sit, where is it written that you have to immediately be able to hold 90 degrees? I am not a huge fan of tuck L holds as I have found that their degree of transfer over to straight leg L sits is rather limited. I have found it much more benefical to simply work the L sit at the angle you are currently capable of and increase that angle over time as your strength and/or flexibility improves.


Yours in Fitness,
Coach Sommer

OlympicBodies@aol.com
http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/229/
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 10:58 AM   #5
Guest
Departed Guest is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 1,095
I don't know that it's written anywhere - in fact, most of this stuff isn't it seems. My beef with the lower than 90 L-sit arises simply from my most common observation of the position: people straining with hyper-lordotic low backs until utter failure, followed by immediate and continuing complaints of back pain. I suppose it's all speculation at this point, but that makes me very uncomfortable. If everyone attempting the L-sit had at least enough strength and flexibility to maintain a normal lower back arch in the position, I'd be all for it. But that, in my experience, is just not the case. Maybe I'll just make all of them take their shoes off.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 11:01 AM   #6
Bryan Edge
Member Bryan Edge is offline
 
Bryan Edge's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lynnwood  WA
Posts: 195
Thanks folks! This is great advice (off to print it out so I can keep it for my Crossfit notebook).

I'll just continue trying the L-sit and try to increase time and get to the 90 degrees. I can do the basic planche (knees on elbows) for about a minute plus, so I was hoping to progress to the tuck. In the tuck-planche, do I simply straighten the arms completely with my knees on the outside of my elbows? Or do I bring the knees on the inside (and just "brace" them as much as possible)?

As for the L-sit, flexibility (generally) shouldn't be too much of an issue. I can pretty much do a full splits (forward and side), and touch my nose to knees without too much difficulty. (It's a bit tougher than when I was younger, however... :-) )

Thankss again!



  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 12:02 PM   #7
Roger Harrell
Affiliate Roger Harrell is offline
 
Roger Harrell's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Rafael  CA
Posts: 2,318
For the planche yes, do the tuck planche with straight arms and knees ouside of elboes. Another transition is what you mentioned. Straight arms knees inside of elboes pusing out a bit to assist, then bring your knees together. Then start extending out to straddle, then bring your legs together and voila a legs together planche. Sounds easy doesn't it?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 02:34 PM   #8
Christopher Sommer
Departed Christopher Sommer is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 225
It is not necessary to train L sits until failure. Usually for the development of static strength, I recommend multiple sets with a duration of half their maximum hold. This will train their active flexibility while allowing them to comfortably increase their proficiency at L sits.


Yours in Fitness,
Coach Sommer

OlympicBodies@aol.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 03:27 PM   #9
Brian Hand
Departed Brian Hand is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 633
Greg, shoes off is definitely a good idea. I'm not sure I follow, do you find the pull on the low back from the hip flexors is much worse below 90 degrees?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2005, 03:42 PM   #10
Guest
Departed Guest is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 1,095
Well the flexors would be pulling the legs up; it's the extensors (hamstrings/glutes) pulling down in addition to gravity. I find typically those who can't hold 90 don't have the strength to maintain a normal curve in their lower backs with the force from fully extended legs driving down.

And I'm absolutely with Coach S on not training them to failure - the problem is that the particular demographic about which I'm concerned here reaches failure in that position immediately, so either gets no static hold at all, or spends a second or two battling at 75 degrees or so with the hyperlordosis.

I guess really it requires a case-by-case evaluation. If the requisite base strength & flexibility to maintain good low back curve with 90 degree legs is there, then extended l-sits are clearly the way to go.

But, I defer to Coach Sommer's far greater experience - my question, Coach, is what do you do in the circumstances of which I speak (hyperlordosis and/or effectively zero static hold time)?
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
L - sits Jerry Berg Exercises 2 02-26-2007 10:12 AM
L-sits Geoff Popadiuk Exercises 2 04-24-2006 08:56 AM
L-Sits Aston Webber Exercises 3 05-23-2005 05:42 AM
L-sits Mark Baldwin Exercises 2 02-03-2005 12:45 PM
L SITS Michael Halbfish Fitness 2 01-08-2004 09:14 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:26 PM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.