CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Health and Medical Issues
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health and Medical Issues For other than injuries

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-25-2013, 07:50 AM   #1
Jim Reaume
Affiliate Jim Reaume is offline
 
Jim Reaume's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Midland  MI
Posts: 22
Chalk Allergy

Has anyone experienced this? I have a client who seems to be allergic to chalk. She has been to the allergist and as usual, they told her to avoid it. She loves CrossFit and REFUSES to avoid it. I try like heck to keep the dust down, but that's impossible. My other clients clean up out of respect for her and it does not help.

I'm concerned for her because her face swells and gets hives and she has to go to work like that. UGH. Any subs for chalk I can try? Any ideas at all?

Thanks.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 08:01 AM   #2
Sara Ochsner
Member Sara Ochsner is offline
 
Sara Ochsner's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Bayou Vista  LA
Posts: 1,254
Re: Chalk Allergy

I use chalk balls at home and they tend to make less of a mess.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 08:09 AM   #3
Jeff Enge
Banned Jeff Enge is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Collinsville  IL
Posts: 5,542
Re: Chalk Allergy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Reaume View Post
Has anyone experienced this? I have a client who seems to be allergic to chalk. She has been to the allergist and as usual, they told her to avoid it. She loves CrossFit and REFUSES to avoid it. I try like heck to keep the dust down, but that's impossible. My other clients clean up out of respect for her and it does not help.

I'm concerned for her because her face swells and gets hives and she has to go to work like that. UGH. Any subs for chalk I can try? Any ideas at all?

Thanks.
Rosin bags! Like baseball pitchers use.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 01:52 PM   #4
Tristan Hoyle
Member Tristan Hoyle is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Henderson  NV
Posts: 310
Re: Chalk Allergy

At our box we have no powdered chalk. Instead we use liquid grip. It's a chalk-resin combo that comes in a bottle. You just rub it on your hands and it dries on and functions as chalk. No Rechalking and no dust. It comes off pretty easy too.

Here's a link: http://liquidgrip.com/ (WFS)
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 08:18 AM   #5
Christopher Morris
Member Christopher Morris is offline
 
Christopher Morris's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Highlands Ranch  CO
Posts: 1,301
Re: Chalk Allergy

Tristan -
Thanks for the tip. I've never heard of Liquid Grip before. I just ordered a little bottle and am excited to try it out.

Jim -
Having your client take a histamine blocker may help (wfs). Benadryl is the most common, though it does cause drowsiness. You'd want her to find a dose that's enough to limit swelling and hives, but not so much that she's a risk driving to work, or non-productive at work. If she wants to try that, start with half a tablet (about 12mg of Benadryl), then maybe go up to 25mg if that's not working. To get a half dose, a capsule can be opened and half the medicine poured out, or a tablet can be crushed between two spoons, and half the powder taken. If she takes that 30 minutes before working out, it should help.
__________________
Chris
http://www.drchristophermorris.com/ wfs
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 08:35 AM   #6
Christopher Morris
Member Christopher Morris is offline
 
Christopher Morris's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Highlands Ranch  CO
Posts: 1,301
Re: Chalk Allergy

And a disclaimer - if she insists on being exposed to something she's allergic too, you've got to inform her that this can make allergies worse. She's may be training her immune system to have a stronger response. One day this response may be life threatening. Taking Benadryl doesn't avoid the risk of this increasing allergic response. This increasing risk may or may not happen, but she needs to know about it.
__________________
Chris
http://www.drchristophermorris.com/ wfs
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 08:54 AM   #7
Tristan Hoyle
Member Tristan Hoyle is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Henderson  NV
Posts: 310
Re: Chalk Allergy

It's a pretty great product. Just make sure to give it 5-7 minutes before the WOD to dry. It sucks in the middle if you didn't let it dry enough and starts to come off. If you let it dry enough though, I was able to perform all of Murph and finish with it still gripping as well as it did at the start.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 05:39 AM   #8
Dare Vodusek
Member Dare Vodusek is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Kidricevo  Slovania
Posts: 901
Re: Chalk Allergy

Christopher, isnt niacin (vit B3) also considered a histamine blocker and also very safe to use?
__________________
Originally Posted by Rick Scarpulla
Toughness is a state of mind not a size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 05:53 AM   #9
Christopher Morris
Member Christopher Morris is offline
 
Christopher Morris's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Highlands Ranch  CO
Posts: 1,301
Re: Chalk Allergy

Just "Chris" is good, thanks.

I have never heard of niacin as a histamine blocker, so a Google search of "niacin histamine blocker" helped me find this abstract (wfs). It states that niacin INCREASES histamine levels, so no, it is not a histamine blocker.

Also, I've been using the liquid grip, and it's great. If I use a thin coating, it dries in less than a minute. It doesn't leave any marks on the rubber mats when doing push-ups or burpees. It doesn't leave any residue on bars.

The only drawback is that it has to dry. Once I put on too thick a layer, and it didn't dry for five minutes, which is a long time when you're ready to workout. If it's not dry it sticks to anything you touch.
__________________
Chris
http://www.drchristophermorris.com/ wfs
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 06:35 AM   #10
Dare Vodusek
Member Dare Vodusek is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Kidricevo  Slovania
Posts: 901
Re: Chalk Allergy

Interesting, as Ive read people are using b3 to fight their histamine levels which are increased due to allergy. But they are taking up to 1gram of it. Ill look into it and report back.

About the liquid chalk, how hard is it to wash it off later, compare to just chalk?
__________________
Originally Posted by Rick Scarpulla
Toughness is a state of mind not a size.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
birch pollen allergy? Scott Hallas Nutrition 5 04-28-2011 06:58 PM
cat allergy and new house Brian Castillo Health and Medical Issues 3 11-06-2009 11:03 PM
Signs of gluten intolerance/allergy? Matt Laney Nutrition 14 08-10-2009 12:47 AM
avocado allergy? Charlie Karnick Nutrition 1 02-05-2009 03:50 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:08 AM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.