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Old 02-08-2011, 08:22 AM   #1
Bill Gibson
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Surgery

Could it be that medical professionals are so quick to recommend surgery in for ailments/sports related injuries because there is an obvious financial incentive? In your opinion, for relatively smaller injuries, why not just recommend a better diet and a rehabilitation exercise regimen?

:stir:
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:32 AM   #2
Lenora Galitz-Pfeffer
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Re: Surgery

I think there are many variations in how and when medical Doctors recommend surgery for injuries. I have had a couple of them recommend physical therapy and exercise. Both were known for their surgery work. I think they may lag behind in recommending proper nutrition.
OK. Pot is stirred. I'm sure there'll be lots of responses on this.
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:36 AM   #3
Everett Steinbarger
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Re: Surgery

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Originally Posted by Bill Gibson View Post
Could it be that medical professionals are so quick to recommend surgery in for ailments/sports related injuries because there is an obvious financial incentive? In your opinion, for relatively smaller injuries, why not just recommend a better diet and a rehabilitation exercise regimen?
I personally think that the idea of surgeons rushing off to the OR for trivial reasons, or to pad their wallets, is overblown and quite honestly offensive.

The reasons to go to surgery are manyfold. Voluminous tomes have been written on the evaluation of patients and the indication/contraindication for surgery. The decision to cut the skin of another human is not made lightly.

If an injury can be healed by dietary changes, rehabilitation, and exercise/lifestyle modification, most surgeons are all for it. Most of us in this profession have plenty to do without rushing off to the OR for trivial cases.
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Old 02-08-2011, 09:01 AM   #4
Tamara Cohen
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Re: Surgery

I've played competitive sports for most of my life, and I've never had a surgeon recommend surgery for any of my injuries. I just had an orthopedic surgeon work with me on rehabbing a SLAP tear without surgery. Trust me, I am a pain in the @ss as a patient. It would have been much better for his sanity to just cut me open and get it over with instead of dealing with my office visits for almost 4 months. But, that wasn't the right decision, and it's not what he recommended.

I'm married to a surgeon. Guess what? Sometimes surgery happens because patients are lazy. "But, I don't WANT to change my diet or keep a journal or exercise! Can't you just cut me open and fix it?" The last thing my husband wants to do is cut open an overweight patient with a crappy diet who probably smokes and who isn't going to do what they are supposed to do in order to follow up and recover properly. And, THAT is the majority of our society.
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Old 02-08-2011, 09:19 AM   #5
Rene Forestier
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Re: Surgery

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Gibson View Post
Could it be that medical professionals are so quick to recommend surgery in for ailments/sports related injuries because there is an obvious financial incentive? In your opinion, for relatively smaller injuries, why not just recommend a better diet and a rehabilitation exercise regimen?

:stir:
There may be a component of that, but I would say that there is enough business out there for surgeons, that they don't have to drum up business by recommending unnecessary surgery. Its also a matter of perspective...a surgeon spends years learning how to solve problems...by surgery.

My father-in-law (a retired orthopedic surgeon) generally refused to do back surgery because patients invariably refused to do the weight loss and excercise that would probably cure their pain. Its another reason why bariatric surgery is so controversial.
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Old 02-08-2011, 09:39 AM   #6
Ryan Grady
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Re: Surgery

ive always wondered this too... i mean, if i go to a car salesman he is not going to say, "Ehhhh you know what... the car you got now is not too bad. I wouldnt buy a new car just keep what you have and have a great day..." I wondered if surgeons work that way too...? but glad to read from people with more knowledge than me that it most likely DOESNT work that way...

but to throw another point out there (sorry)... i had surgery to repair a broken radius bone in my left forearm. titanium plate, screws, all that good stuff... my surgeon participated with my insurance and long story short, when all was said and done, he made $381.00 After what my insurance "allowed" and covered, that is what that man earned for cutting me open and putting metal into my body. It was more expensive for me to get this highschool kid to install a new soundsystem into my car....

i imagine some doctors have to take out some pretty hefty loans as well to get through all that schooling... so couple that with the way insurance companies are squeezing the hell of out them, and maybe its not so crazy to think SOME (not all) doctors would be quicker to opt for surgery than just turn a patient away...?
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Old 02-08-2011, 10:30 AM   #7
Tamara Cohen
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Re: Surgery

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Originally Posted by Ryan Grady View Post
my surgeon participated with my insurance and long story short, when all was said and done, he made $381.00 After what my insurance "allowed" and covered, that is what that man earned for cutting me open and putting metal into my body. It was more expensive for me to get this highschool kid to install a new soundsystem into my car....

i imagine some doctors have to take out some pretty hefty loans as well to get through all that schooling... so couple that with the way insurance companies are squeezing the hell of out them, and maybe its not so crazy to think SOME (not all) doctors would be quicker to opt for surgery than just turn a patient away...?
And, don't forget that with that $381.00, he also had to pay his staff, his rent, his electricity, his malpractice insurance, etc.

It's not usually a choice between surgery and turning a patient away. Surgeons do LOTS of non-surgical things. Most of them spend more time outside of the operating room than in it.
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Old 02-08-2011, 10:38 AM   #8
Everett Steinbarger
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Re: Surgery

Ryan's forearm fracture represents a very interesting case actually.

Radius shaft fractures can be treated without surgery. Up until this past century no one would have thought of fixing one. Long arm cast for 8 weeks and you're done. Another 12 months of stretching and range of motion would probably return to a functional, although limited range.

The problem with that is the great majority of people lost some rotation of the forearm. Some went on to develop non-unions, where the bone did not heal together. Some people developed mal-unions and had significant deformity.

Nowadays, we fix these immediately without questioning it. Basically because the standard of care demands it. Surgery, in this case, allows faster healing and a quicker return to the demands of life.

The argument can be made that Ryan would have been fine with a little rotation loss. He would have been able to carry on his life, work, and support a family. Was this surgery unnecessary? I don't think so, but outside of the US/Europe it may have been deemed so.
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Old 02-08-2011, 01:27 PM   #9
Rene Forestier
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Re: Surgery

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Grady View Post
ive always wondered this too... i mean, if i go to a car salesman he is not going to say, "Ehhhh you know what... the car you got now is not too bad. I wouldnt buy a new car just keep what you have and have a great day..." I wondered if surgeons work that way too...? but glad to read from people with more knowledge than me that it most likely DOESNT work that way...

but to throw another point out there (sorry)... i had surgery to repair a broken radius bone in my left forearm. titanium plate, screws, all that good stuff... my surgeon participated with my insurance and long story short, when all was said and done, he made $381.00 After what my insurance "allowed" and covered, that is what that man earned for cutting me open and putting metal into my body. It was more expensive for me to get this highschool kid to install a new soundsystem into my car....

i imagine some doctors have to take out some pretty hefty loans as well to get through all that schooling... so couple that with the way insurance companies are squeezing the hell of out them, and maybe its not so crazy to think SOME (not all) doctors would be quicker to opt for surgery than just turn a patient away...?
Don't feel bad for surgeons...they do pretty well.
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Old 02-08-2011, 03:14 PM   #10
Aaron Lengel
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Re: Surgery

Life is not one big conspiracy theory...
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