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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 02-09-2006, 11:42 PM   #1
Chris Wyant
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So I just came across this video - how is this even possible? I mean the flexability demonstrated by this woman - she has to be missing bones or ribs....I mean...

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/videos/liquidlady.html
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Old 02-10-2006, 01:27 AM   #2
Petr Ruzicka
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IMHO she had an car accident, broke a lot of her bones and bones somehow refused to reconnect again...
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Old 02-10-2006, 04:53 AM   #3
Gerhard Lavin
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Contotionist are trained from when they are babies. My fiance worked with one on a dance contract. The womens mother was a contortionist as well and streched and manipluated her from when she was a very young child. Amazing range of motion but in later life often experience joint issue due to laxity of teh tendons etc.
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Old 02-10-2006, 09:44 AM   #4
Jibreel Freeland
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Ugh...hypermobility
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Old 02-12-2006, 01:32 PM   #5
Clay Shelley
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That's screwed up. She literally sat on her head.
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Old 02-13-2006, 02:00 PM   #6
Roger Harrell
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Contortion to that degree also requires the right genetics. Few people (even with stretching from birth) can achieive that level of flexibility. This certainly can lead to severe joint instability. Yes, you can be too flexible.

(Message edited by rogair on February 13, 2006)
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Old 02-13-2006, 06:19 PM   #7
Adrian Bozman
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I would partially disagree with Roger:

Flexibility to the extent displayed in the video is certainly aided by genetics, but I've witnessed people training for careers in the circus become scary-flexible over the span of several years, even when starting in their late teens/early twenties. When all you do is get stretched for 4-8 hours a day, 5-7 days a week, you adapt....the flip side is just like the 'timecourse of training adaptaions' study Coach was talking about at the seminar; you will become better at what you do, but to the detriment of every other physical skill you posses (strength, power, stamina etc). This scenario happens all the time with any activity that is taken to an absurd level: awkward, lanky kid starts a sport, sticks to it, and after 5-10 years of hard work is an absolute Adonis/Venus, or at least freakishly good at what he/she is doing. Once at that level, people are quick to discount the amount of work and commitment that went into that particular modality of training and lump it into the 'genetics' category. He/She must have been 'built' for the sport.

That being said, the woman in that video does display more flexibility than most contortionists I've witnessed, and I'm sure genetics are a factor, but I wouldn't be so quick to lump all contortionists into the 'genetically gifted' category.
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Old 02-13-2006, 07:45 PM   #8
Paul Findley
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DQ, she left the mat on her final move.
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Old 02-14-2006, 02:16 AM   #9
Blair Robert Lowe
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I wonder upon watching it if she has the muscular ability to hold support positions like a true back limber ( back bend, kick over legs through handstand to stand on feet ). Obviously not her intention, but I just can't see her doing that.
Interesting in one way to see the body control to do that body wave. OTOH, as an athlete and gymnast- it seems just too extreme.
Last year, I met up with some acrobats and they came across to me as a jack of all trades in gymnastics. Not the best but good all around with an emphasis on balancing and body awareness that might put other gymnasts to shame. This still seems functional, even let's say the chinese acrobats in Circus Du Soleil who can achieve astounding positions utilizing flexibility but still are extremely tensile pound for pound.
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Old 02-14-2006, 03:46 AM   #10
Chris Forbis
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"awkward, lanky kid starts a sport, sticks to it, and after 5-10 years of hard work is an absolute Adonis/Venus, or at least freakishly good at what he/she is doing. Once at that level, people are quick to discount the amount of work and commitment that went into that particular modality of training and lump it into the 'genetics' category. He/She must have been 'built' for the sport."

Adrian -
I get this crap in basketball all the time. They think the reason I'm good at basketball is because I'm 6'4". ("If I was as tall as you, I'd be good at basketball, too" attitudes.) They have no idea how freaking terrible I was at age 8 and the years of work (>2 hours a day without fail) it took to become a good one. I've always been tall for my age... haven't always been really good at ball.
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