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Old 05-04-2008, 12:27 PM   #11
Howard Wilcox
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

Well, I have sprained ankles and broke my left ankle around the 8th grade (now 36). I don't think this has been a big deal until I noticed it a couple years ago when I thought I had strained my lower back. I think that is what turned out to be a tight/spasm/trigger-point in the psoas and it prevented me from heavy squatting (relative).

I'm pretty much over that and I'm hitting PRs in deads and squats with little to no pain (some tightness perhaps). I make it a point to stretch hard after the workouts and things seem to be moving along just fine. But the foot thing bothers me a little bit and if some extra, targeted stretching will help it, I would like to fix it.

howard
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Old 05-04-2008, 08:50 PM   #12
Stephen Macioci
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

try foam rolling your IT band (outer hip) and your outer calve..
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Old 05-04-2008, 08:52 PM   #13
Howard Wilcox
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

Ok, thanks...I've really got to stop procrastinating on the foam roller. I suspect it will make many things better.


howard
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Old 05-04-2008, 09:13 PM   #14
Jeff Alexander
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

Howard,

I have a client who used to be known for his "Charlie Chaplin walk." Well, here we are 3 years later and no more Charlie Chaplin. You have 7 muscles in the deep hip, the largest of which is the Piriformis. The Piriformis laterally rotates the thigh in a standing position (pulls your butt forward), and it abducts the thigh in a seated position (rotates your knee outward). The stretch shown on the site Amanda mentioned is a good one, only I would add that if you have a wall to place your foot against, then you can completely relax the hip.

An easy test to see if you have tight Piriformis muscles is to sit with your feet flat on the floor, knees at 90 degrees. Take one ankle and lay it across the opposite knee. Lower the knee of your crossed leg while keeping your ankle in place so that your knee rotates down and out. If you can lower your knee to level with the other one easily, then your Piriformis probably isn't the cause of your toes turning out.

If you have a lot of trouble with lowering your knee, then take a deep breath as you rotate your knee up and in, and exhale as you lower your leg down and out again. Repeat 5-10 times, holding the down position a little longer each time. You can gently apply pressure with your hands to aid the stretching process.

Good luck, train hard, and try not to become Mr. Chaplin.
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Old 05-05-2008, 04:55 AM   #15
Camille Lore
 
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

My R foot rotates out- just tried that test and wow are they both tight!
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Old 05-05-2008, 11:20 PM   #16
Amanda Faulks
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

Howard the reason I asked about sprained ankles was that most sprains are inversion sprains, meaning you roll onto the outside of your ankle and the bottom of your foot turns inwards. This often over stretches the muscles that run down the lateral side or outside of your leg. These muscles work to plantar flex and evert the foot (turn it out). If the tendons of these muscles have been stretched due to a sprain they are not as effective at turning your foot out. Not saying this is what is going on but it is a possibility. The muscles I am talking about are the fibularis (peroneus) brevis and longus muscles. They are known by either name, fibularis is a little more new school I think. Here is a link (wfs) http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap/muscu.../tutorial.html
it shows the origin and insertion as well as the action of this muscle. You can also see the brevis muscle if you click on the more tutorials button at the top right.

One way to test the strength of this muscle is to see if it can do this action, point the foot and turn it so the bottom faces away from the midline of your body. Make sure the action is at your ankle only do not move your knees. Hope this helps you rule some things out.

Amanda
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Old 05-06-2008, 08:06 AM   #17
Howard Wilcox
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

That is a very cool little tool. Thanks.


Well, it's the right foot that is turned out and it is the left that was broken. I can't remember which one was sprained as playing basketball, they both likely were.


So, does anyone think that rather than the right being turned out, in reality the left is turned in?

howard
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Old 05-07-2008, 09:35 PM   #18
Amanda Faulks
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

No problem Howard I was stoked to find it too. I am studying for my massage therapy board exam that is in September I am using these threads to keep my mind in the game without any structured study. I am taking a break till after my b-day in the end of May.

There is a quick way to get a rough idea which foot is turned out more. It is called the "too many toes sign" stand as you would normally don't try and stand the way you think you should and have feet bare. Have someone stand about three or four feet directly behind you, when they look at your feet they should only see your little toe and about half of the one next to it. All this tells you is which foot is misaligned it doesn't let you know where or what is causing it.

Without seeing you and doing my own postural exam and special tests I really have no idea what is going on. But it is awesome that you are looking into this and trying to fix it.

Amanda
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Old 05-09-2008, 02:22 AM   #19
Cal Jones
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

I have the same thing. My right foot flicks out when I run. I'm female and have a large Q angle (wide hips, slightly knock knees). I can't seem to do much about it. I did sprain my right ankle quite badly falling downstairs as a kid, though my structure doesn't help I'm sure.
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Old 05-09-2008, 01:09 PM   #20
Arturo Garcia
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Re: What's the source of the problem when one foot is turned out a little?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Alexander View Post
Howard,

I have a client who used to be known for his "Charlie Chaplin walk." Well, here we are 3 years later and no more Charlie Chaplin. You have 7 muscles in the deep hip, the largest of which is the Piriformis. The Piriformis laterally rotates the thigh in a standing position (pulls your butt forward), and it abducts the thigh in a seated position (rotates your knee outward). The stretch shown on the site Amanda mentioned is a good one, only I would add that if you have a wall to place your foot against, then you can completely relax the hip.

An easy test to see if you have tight Piriformis muscles is to sit with your feet flat on the floor, knees at 90 degrees. Take one ankle and lay it across the opposite knee. Lower the knee of your crossed leg while keeping your ankle in place so that your knee rotates down and out. If you can lower your knee to level with the other one easily, then your Piriformis probably isn't the cause of your toes turning out.

If you have a lot of trouble with lowering your knee, then take a deep breath as you rotate your knee up and in, and exhale as you lower your leg down and out again. Repeat 5-10 times, holding the down position a little longer each time. You can gently apply pressure with your hands to aid the stretching process.

Good luck, train hard, and try not to become Mr. Chaplin.
Sir, just curious, what if after performing this test, I find it much easier to lower the knee of the leg with the foot that points outwards? It's always been like this for me. It's my right foot that points outwards, yet when I cross my right leg over my left, the knee can go down, to level with the left, with no problem. However, when I cross my left leg (left ankle over right thig), the left knee stays higher up. If I push down I could get it to a lower level, but I'd have to conciously be doing an effort to do that.

Is there another test to figure out if it's something else?
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