CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-12-2008, 02:01 PM   #1
Joseph Davidoski
Member Joseph Davidoski is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Va Beach  VA
Posts: 11
Scaling Rationale

It has been posted a lot that all WODs can be scaled based on both ability level and a person's genetics (size, age, watever). My question is, are the WODs going off a certain model person? Like, are the WODs being built around a 180 lb male w/ 10 percent body fat or something? If so, how would I scale appropriately for a workout if I am a 155 lb male. This is key because there are WODS i can do at the Rxed weight, but I dont' think I am getting the proper benefits. A good example is Fran at 95# or 75#. At 75, I get a lot more gassed than 95. So how can I apply that scaling to say Elizabeth?
__________________
Per angusta ad augusta - Through adversity to triumph
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 02:06 PM   #2
Steven Low
Member Steven Low is offline
 
Steven Low's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: silver spring  maryland
Posts: 12,221
Re: Scaling Rationale

WODs are built for a 175 lbs male.

For the metcons (aka the girl WODs), scale it so you're as gassed as possible. That's the intent for those WODs. So you said you were more gassed with the 75 lbs Fran as opposed to the 95 lbs Fran.. keep doing that. If you're strong and well conditioned enough that were you 135 lbs and could do Fran at 95 lbs continuous and were gassed by that then do that.

If you're scaling too much though you might just need strength. Most people haven't done much Oly lifts coming into CF so the cleans might have to be scaled a lot early on with a lot of miscellaneous skill work. Do what you can to make it as gassing as possible (experiment).
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 06:28 PM   #3
Brad Davis
Member Brad Davis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Blacksburg  VA
Posts: 608
Re: Scaling Rationale

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
WODs are built for a 175 lbs male.
I typed that once and Ms. Pitts smacked me down. Figuratively speaking of course, LOL.

Apparently, it's not that exact.

For one thing, I think we see big guys like Greg A. doing 95 lb thrusters in Fran, do we not?

This subject seems like a free-for-all to me. I've often wondered why weights are listed in the WOD definitions. x % of a 1 rep max (or something similar) seems more logical.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 06:38 PM   #4
Steven Low
Member Steven Low is offline
 
Steven Low's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: silver spring  maryland
Posts: 12,221
Re: Scaling Rationale

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Davis View Post
I typed that once and Ms. Pitts smacked me down. Figuratively speaking of course, LOL.

Apparently, it's not that exact.

For one thing, I think we see big guys like Greg A. doing 95 lb thrusters in Fran, do we not?

This subject seems like a free-for-all to me. I've often wondered why weights are listed in the WOD definitions. x % of a 1 rep max (or something similar) seems more logical.
Yes, it is. If you knew where it came from you could just link to it to prove it (from the FAQ).

http://www.crossfit.com/cf-info/faq.html#General2

Bigger guys also have a harder time with pullups as opposed to the thrusters. Everything evens out. Some workouts are harder for heavier people and some are harder for lighter people like the ones with heavy barbell work. The point is don't worry about it too much. If you can do it as prescribed and it gasses you then that's good. If you need to scale up or scale down for it to gas you then do so.

Last edited by Steven Low : 01-12-2008 at 06:40 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 07:09 PM   #5
Brad Davis
Member Brad Davis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Blacksburg  VA
Posts: 608
Re: Scaling Rationale

Steven, she typed the following:

"Brad, not exactly. The weights aren't "for a 175 pound guy." When I wrote the FAQ, and people were having trouble scaling weights, I made a generalization that the average fit CrossFitter was around 175#, and suggested that using that as a conversion factor for your own bodyweight would be a useful starting place to scale.

The number is a figment of Pitts' imagination. The WODS are not written with that number anywhere in anyone's mind.

Not poking at anyone here; just taking the opportunity to clarify."

It's here, top of Page 2: http://www.board.crossfit.com/showth...&highlight=175 (WFS of course)

The bottom line is still to use something manageable for the individual.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2008, 07:54 PM   #6
Brandon Oto
Member Brandon Oto is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Santa Cruz  CA
Posts: 3,001
Re: Scaling Rationale

A somewhat more philosophical point is that in real life, the weight is what it is, and you can't scale it how you want; if you want to change your relative masses, it has to be your body you adjust, not the load.

This kind of thing is presumably why Greg is doing 95lb thrusters and so is poor Steven
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2008, 08:53 AM   #7
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
Re: Scaling Rationale

Brandon, I like the way you think. i look at the wod, as written, as the gold standard. If you want to alter the wod to meet a specific performance goal you have, have at it. But your "score" is based on the gold standard. If I see a raw time alone in the blog (say 5:08), I assume that is 5:08 with no modifications to the prescribed wod. If you modify the program, say so: "5:08 with 150# deadlift". Sort of truth in advertising. This way everyone knows where they stand.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2008, 09:12 AM   #8
Darrell E. White
Member Darrell E. White is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: bay village  OH
Posts: 955
Re: Scaling Rationale

This is kind of a pet topic for me on which I've written often, both here and on the main page. I think it should be firmly stated, and can't be stated enough, that the goal is to do the posted WOD exactly as it is written, As Rx'd. For the purpose of measuring your fitness, if you can do it, this is mandatory.

Now, for training purposes there are numerous reasons to scale. What if, like me, you are "under-strong" and have trouble moving the as Rx'd weights? You might need to scale for safety purposes in order to avoid injury. What if, again like me, there are some WOD's in which you can move the weight but it is quite close to your max and you cannot move the weight quickly? Then I think you must make a decision about what training effect you wish to garner from that particular WOD on that particular day.

For example let's use "Fran", arguably a candidate as the signature WOD for CF. 95 # thruster followed by pull-ups, 21-15-9 (let's assume for this example that pull-ups are not an issue). When I began CF a 95# Thruster was pretty much my 1 rep max so my initial "Fran" was just the 45# oly bar. I would alternate on subsequent "Frans" between lighter thrusters so that I could go faster and do a metcon wipe-out, and heavier Thrusters so that I could gain the strength to eventually do a "Fran" as Rx'd, even though those heavier sessions were much, much slower and didn't leave me terribly winded, just bone tired! So I was making a conscious decision before the WOD, because of my personal level of fitness, whether that WOD would be a metcon or strength/muscle-endurance work-out on that particular day. (My as Rx'd "Fran" is 9:58).

Hope that helps...
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2008, 10:16 AM   #9
Steven Low
Member Steven Low is offline
 
Steven Low's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: silver spring  maryland
Posts: 12,221
Re: Scaling Rationale

Yeah, I agree just to work up to it as rx'ed. It's worked thus far for everyone hasn't it (no matter what the weight)?
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2008, 10:17 AM   #10
Robert D Taylor Jr
Member Robert D Taylor Jr is offline
 
Robert D Taylor Jr's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Chesapeake  VA
Posts: 1,736
Re: Scaling Rationale

this thread mirrors thoughts I have been having lately. I scale just about every Metcon workout for time. That is I use Rxed weights and reps but have the WOD take longer. My ratinale is that since effectively Crossfit is my sport, the conditioning I get directly applies to it. Is that a fallacy, am I missing a key piece. My times are generally mid pack. 24+ round Cindy high 7 s Fran. 8 43 Diane etc. Sometimes less so, my Filthy Fifty is in the high forties my Murph around 55 min.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linda and scaling Andrew Craig Workout of the Day 3 01-11-2008 03:33 PM
Scaling help needed David Secondino Starting 4 07-14-2006 02:49 PM
Rationale Behind "Three on, One off" Joe Miller Fitness 5 01-05-2006 04:18 AM
Scaling up Graham Hayes Fitness 15 06-30-2005 12:08 PM
CFJ - What's the rationale behind lower-calories at snacks? Ross Hunt Nutrition 19 05-10-2004 03:24 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.