CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-06-2004, 12:07 PM   #11
Jim Butts
Member Jim Butts is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: New Westminster  B.C.
Posts: 98
Lynne and Kelly,

I think maybe you are underestimating your needs when calculating your zone requirements. The 10 blocks for a 'small female' would be appropriate for a hard training person (crossfitter) with about 70lbs of lean body mass, depending on the activity level that they chose, and I would guess having read your posts for awhile that you are both well above that. (A 110lb. person with 70lbs lbm would be almost 40% bodyfat!) I 'think' Coach was just throwing out those categories ('small female', 'hard gainer', etc.) to provide an example of how to approach the zone, without getting too technical.

I think there's a bit more 'wiggle room' allowed in the zone than is at first apparent.As I understand it, find your daily protein requirement by multiplying your 'lean body mass' (Sears words) by your 'activity factor', then divide the result by 7 to get your 'blocks' for the day.

For example, a hypothetical crossfitter weighing 114 pounds would first subtract their bodyfat % from 114 to get lbm. Our crossfitter has 15% bf leaving 97 lbs. lbm. The next part, choosing an appropriate 'activity factor' is very subjective, hence the 'wiggle room'. I think most Crossfitters, especially 'small women' who also do unit pt and work on farms, could easily justify an acivity factor of 1.0, meaning our hypothetical person should multiply 97 x 1.0 to find their daily protein requirement in grams. (The activity factors start at 0.5 for a 'sedentary person' and go to 1.0 for 'heavy daily weight training coupled with intense sports training or twice-a-day intense sports training'.) Then divide 97 (lbm) by 7 to get the daily 'blocks' allowed.Low-glycemic carbs and 'good' fats come along for the ride with an equal # of blocks. Our example comes to just about 14 blocks, or 3-3-2-4-2, 4-3-2-4-1, or however you want to apportion them into at least 5 'meals'. This would come to about 1270 calories. Your mileage may vary. Also, Sears is clear that if any meal leaves you feeling either spacey or unsatisfied you can adjust the carbs/protein to find 'your' correct level. More subjectivity. Does this make sense?

By the way, I've been lurking and 'doing' and assimilating since last summer, though I haven't posted much. I'll introduce myself over on 'Starting' when I get a chance. I'm constantly amazed by the quality of the people that make up the 'Crossfit community'. Jim
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2004, 04:40 AM   #12
Lynne Pitts
Administrator Lynne Pitts is offline
 
Lynne Pitts's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Richmond  NH
Posts: 3,232
Jim,
My head just stopped spinning - thanks a bunch for taking the time to lay that out.

The only problem is that it still doesn't transform me into a 20 y.o. male who can eat 5000 cals a day... :happy:
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2004, 06:49 AM   #13
Dale Yakutchik
 
Profile:  
Posts: n/a
I have been following the Zone diet for over 8 years now and have reccomended the diet to over 50 people. I have not seen one failure to produce drastic change in the bodies Biochemistry.

Recently I have added some additional changes to help maintain peak performance on the zone diet. I began a number of months ago to research the alkaline vs Acid body chemistry that can be created from protein in our diet as well as Uric and lactic acid build up. (you can buy PH strips and place them on your tongue to see how acidic you are)

Over acidification of the blood and tissue as a result of yeast, fungus and bacteria fermentation. Essentially the fermentation release by products into the blood and exracellular fluid and is distributed to the body. These toxins can systematically destroy cells and tissue in the body.

Following the Zone diet and making sure to eat alkaline foods in the diet will get you even better gains in your performance. Yeast fungus and bacteria cannot survive in a alkaline environment. Essentially the body works to maintain a PH balance of 7.3 when this reduces lower from our diet and foods that are not organically grown the body becomes acidic. Tissue cannot repair itself properly in acidic environment. In order to compensate the body retains fluid to help flush acids out of the body in the kidney.(ever seen a pool when the ph is out of wack-picture your blood)
It is important to eat your fruits as snacks in the zone and focus more on vegetable and greens during your breakfest lunch and dinner. This is essentially (for all of you BJJ practioners out there how the Gracie family eats)
I found great results with this type of eating and found that it really added even more energy to my zone diet. I also supplemented with Supreme greens and found it works great to ensure you take in enough greens and key minerals. Focus on organic foods even in the zone and get some good greens as a supplment and take coral calcium all of which maintain a great alkaline environment.
Check out this web site for diet tips
www.hsnow.com/healthzone
Any feedback??


Dale
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2004, 09:49 AM   #14
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Dale,

I believe that the buffers in your blood (bicarbonate/carbonic acid,
monosodium phosphate/bisodium phosphate, proteins/proteinates), along with your kidneys and lungs, do a pretty darn good job of maintaining a healthy blood pH. Follow Crossfit for a while, and the system probably gets even better.

I know that exercise affects blood pH, that is for certain, but I don’t think your diet affects blood pH to any significant level, unless you’re really trying (doing shots of bicarb and/or acetic acid). I could be wrong of course.

Coral calcium, alkaline diet... I don't know man, reminds me of "Eat Right for Your Blood Type," and the Dr. Wallach colloidal minerals scams that pervade the internet.

Brad

Brad
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2004, 12:12 PM   #15
Dale Yakutchik
 
Profile:  
Posts: n/a
Hey Brad,

Apprecitate the feedback. I know I did not expect much better health as I already followed the Zone for many years. You are rigt the body does do a great Job when it has the right balance working. The problem is that are food just does not produce enough of the minerals we need. Check out the Dept of Agriculutre comments in 1936- They stated then that our soil does not produce enough minerals or nutrients anymore.
Also Uric Acid is a primary by product of a high protein diet which is why so many people who follow the Atkins diet end up with gout and cannot get it back under control. Diet can significantly impact acid level--PH doe does not move that drastically or we would all be dead--but we can impact it somewhat..

Anyway Bro--- Just a suggestion---it worked for me and since you are a grappler this is what Randy Coutre claimed help him gettraining so hard again.


Dale
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2004, 01:41 PM   #16
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Couldn't hurt to try. :-)
Thanks for the suggestions!
Brad
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2004, 04:57 PM   #17
Jim Butts
Member Jim Butts is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: New Westminster  B.C.
Posts: 98
Lynne,

Sorry, can't help you there... My solution is to pretend I'm still 20 and eat (or drink) 5000 calories anyway.

Jim
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2004, 09:50 AM   #18
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
Brad/Dale-

Loren Cordain makes a pretty good stink about eating a net base (alkalinizing) diet. I have noticed a difference in this area and if one follows Dale's advice it just happens on the zone.

One is tracking the net acid/base load on the kidneys ove time, not just a fluctuation meal to meal.

This topic can get dicey as it is a central point of raw foodists, hygenists and vegans...even the kooks get things "right" occasionally!
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2004, 01:55 PM   #19
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Rob,

This is good info... considering my mother is now suffering though the effects of ADPKD (autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease). I'll talk to her nephrologist about some dietary changes.

Brad
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2004, 09:51 AM   #20
Brad Hirakawa
Member Brad Hirakawa is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Diego  CA
Posts: 761
Regarding minerals and our food:

http://www.cce.cornell.edu/food/fsar...0898/soil.html

  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for hard-gainer peer to partner up with Aaron Blenkush Community 1 07-22-2007 06:37 PM
Fitness Definitions James Riley Starting 2 10-25-2006 06:46 AM
Weight Gainer? Travis Ransom Nutrition 6 07-12-2006 10:57 AM
Just started the Zone diet, always this hard? Beau Bray Nutrition 10 01-20-2006 03:36 PM
Definitions? Cheryl Cohen Exercises 6 05-07-2005 11:55 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.