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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 05-04-2006, 10:33 AM   #1
Bob Haskin
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I use to do all kinds of body weight exercises in college. In the last 10 years I have weightlifted. I pretty much have maxed weights out since I would have to get much more serious if I wanted to get bigger or lift more (I am 165 lbs and work out with 250 x 10 reps on bench).

Plus every now and then I pull something and have to take a week of so I am going back to body exercises. Plus I feel a little too bulky although I have low body fat (7.8%).

But I think its time to take my workouts in a new direction and I have always liked body weight exercises and gymnastic movements although I was never a gymnast.

Been working 2 weeks on front lever in straddle position. Can now hold an advanced tuck for 30 seconds. My guess is that next week I should be at 45 - 60 seconds and stating to work on getting my legs out into a straddle position. My goal is to do straddle pull ups.

Planche Push Up - man now these are difficult! I can do 100 regular push ups without too much effort. But these are way different.
I can hold a simple planche tuck for 60 seconds. Started working on advanced planche this week. Held once for 10 seconds and that was my longest hold. This one is going to take some time I can tell.

Other exercises I am doing include hand stand pushups (3 sets of 20), Rows (3 sets of 50), Wide Grip pull ups (3 sets of 10).

Doing L-Sits where I hold them for 15 seconds - working up to 60 sec. Also V-ups and Leg Ups (on the bar).

Oh yeah, also hanging up side down on a bar with weights held at each side of my body sort of an upside down iron cross position. Hold the weights for 15 seconds in this position with the goal of being able to hold half of my body weight in each hand.

Still doing squats with weights plus cardio 2 or 3 times per week.

I feel better with these things than with heavy weights. Although I think I am going to have to make sure I don't overtrain and injure my shoulders since there is so much torque with these kinds of exercises.

Also I am going to get some rings and start Rows and some chest and muscle ups.

I have lost a little size in 2 weeks but am about where I want to be. My goal is to be functional and ripped but not wieghtlifer size big. Would rather have that gymnast build.

I have done extremely intense ab exercises and actually tore a stomach muscle for the first time about 3 weeks ago so I am going to modify my ab work outs. (Internal hematoma). Ouch! Let me tell you it hurt like hell! Lucky I did not get a heria. I figure doing the gymnast thing I can cut down on some of the ab stuff I am doing since the whold body is used in the contractions on many of these exercises.
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Old 05-04-2006, 10:45 AM   #2
Russ Greene
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Weightlifters are not necessarily big and bulky. They are fast, flexible, and powerful, however. Bench pressing is not weightlifting. Curls and flyes are not weightlifting. Clean and Jerks and snatches are weightlifting. If you don't know what those exercises are, find out, practice them, and master them. You will be more than repaid in functional power and athletic ability. There's nothing wrong with your program but you had better include an equal emphasis on posterior chain power and strength.
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Old 05-04-2006, 01:04 PM   #3
Jesse Woody
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I totally agree. I'm doing much of what you are, but I also include Deadlifts, Squats, Overhead Press, Cleans, Snatches, push-presses and the like. I think that bodyweight skills have HUGE benefit, but they aren't the full package. Take something useful from everything that you possibly can, and don't discount any one thing.
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Old 05-04-2006, 03:48 PM   #4
Steven Low
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I am a HUGE advocate of bodyweight exercises and I recommend practically everyone to do them especially planche and front lever progressions. I do, however, agree with Russ and Jesse here: unless we are training like gymnasts doing every apparatus (especially floor, vault and rings for the lower back and legs), we need weights to build a strong body, especially the posterior chain. Any sort of Olympic lift, deadlifts, squats, etc. will be very, very beneficial not only for your legs and your back, but they will also increase your vertical jump and time on sprints.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. The main stuff I am working on right now are and might be able to give you advice on perhaps or maybe any other gymnastics related stuff.. (although Roger Harrell knows tons more about gymnastics then most of us combined :-)):

-iron cross pullouts (rings needed)
-rings flys (rings needed, again)
-handstand pushups and holds (on rings)
-adv. tuck planche pushups
-adv. tuck/straddle front lever pullups
-weighted rows
-a few other gymnastics related exercises like press handstands

as for weights I do:
-deadlifts
-squats
-thinking about incorporating some oly lifting, but the gym on my campus doesn't have anywhere to do it
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Old 05-04-2006, 05:15 PM   #5
Jesse Woody
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Steven, if you don't have access to bumper plates and a decent platform you can always garner the posterior chain power development with Hang-Power cleans, keeping the weight managable so you don't have to drop anything ;) I did this for the past two years until the new strength coach at work came in and replaced all of the machines with bumpers and platforms...yes...my job is awesome :p
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Old 05-04-2006, 06:10 PM   #6
Tom Brose
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Steven, are you atill at Maryland? There is a small gym on campus that has bumpers. Ask Jim Bathhurst, or shoot me an email. I havent been there, but I train a rower who found out about it, and I can put you in contact.
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Old 05-04-2006, 10:45 PM   #7
Steven Low
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Good ideas guys.

I'll ask Jim as well.
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Old 05-05-2006, 05:23 AM   #8
Jim Bathurst
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Steve,

I can definitely show you where that gym is located. It's in the HHP about 100 feet from where your profile picture was taken!! :lol: We should hit it up this weekend, catch me on IM.
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Old 05-05-2006, 07:26 AM   #9
Bob Haskin
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I was reading an article on a coach who was a gymnast and had worked with gymnasts 30+ years.

His comment was he had never seen any gymnasts - even those who were in competition at more amateur levels - that have not retained some chronic injuries at some point.

His comment was that he thought this is because they did not work specifically enough on strengthening the opposing stabilizer muscles in the various plains (anterior, saggital, etc..).

So as much as I hate the larger muscle group weight lifting exercises I will work and incorporate them just like I did squats because I understand that you have to balance the various muscle groups.

I have been doing some back though - wide pull ups and back extensions. I know I will have to also incorporate shoulder stabilization because of the tremendous stress on the shoulders due to using the bar and rings and the planche stuff.

Thanks guys!
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Old 05-05-2006, 09:27 AM   #10
Steven Low
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Haha, thanks Jim.

Bob, I know what you mean! A lot of gymnastics is based literally on using the anterior muscles of the body especially the anterior and to a lesser extent medial deltoids. This is where a good set of rope climbs, pullups, front lever pullup progressions, and rows comes in to strengthen the posterior deltoid. I've been basically trying to find my way through what works best in conditioning (and been keeping track of it), and that's one of the major things that helped improve my shoulder strength was to start doing some RC exercises and working on my posterior delts more than I was. For those of us who will never become elite gymnasts, it is literally essential to have good posterior chain work because the amateur gymnastics exercises we do will mainly only focus on the mirror muscles of our bodies.
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