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Old 11-11-2005, 05:53 AM   #1
Nikki Young
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Seeing as casein is made from milk ... Will it still create a noticable insulin spike when consumed? Or is the insulin spike not worth worrying about seeing as it will help increase protein growth and recovery, especially after a workout.

Thanks :lame:
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Old 11-11-2005, 07:05 AM   #2
Larry Lindenman
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Nikki, I don't the insulin spike from milk is from the casein. It is proportably a very slow digesting protein, which is good to consume at night.
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Old 11-11-2005, 12:23 PM   #3
Robert Wolf
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Dairy does elicit an insulin spike but I do not know what constituent(s) cause this. Some googling/time at pubmed may find the answer.
Robb
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Old 11-11-2005, 12:59 PM   #4
Ross Hunt
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Robb,

Is this true even of dairy products that do not include any carbohydrate to speak of? e.g., even of heavy cream or pure casein?
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Old 11-11-2005, 12:59 PM   #5
Scott Shafer
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Galactose, aka, milk sugar.
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Old 11-12-2005, 08:58 AM   #6
Robert Wolf
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Yes...I think it is the protien portion that also causes the insulin spike.

Now this is not a completely unheard of thing. High Lysene content protiens like beef can elicit a pretty good insulin release but it also produces a fair glucagon release. These hormones are counterregulatory and I suspect the release of glucagon prevents, at least to some degree, the down regulation of the insulin receptor and the subsequent insulin resistance.

The dairy/insulin thing makes sense in that insulin is a potent growth promoter and most mamals only consume milk during the earliest stages of life.
Robb
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Old 11-12-2005, 04:23 PM   #7
Ross Hunt
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The dairy/insulin thing makes sense in that insulin is a potent growth promoter and most mamals only consume milk during the earliest stages of life.

But I'm still growin! :wink:

Robb, thanks for the info. So casein elicits some insulin release, but not very much glucagon release. Would the same be true of whey?

Also, might dairy fat perhaps elicit glucagon release, ameliorating whatever insulin spike the casein might cause?

I ask this because I'm working my way through half a pound of cottage cheese as I write this. 4% milkfat minimum only!
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Old 11-13-2005, 02:05 PM   #8
Jesse Woody
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There is an excellent study by Loren Cordain on thepaleodiet.com: http://thepaleodiet.com/articles.htm
that goes into this issue a bit. From what I remember (I read it about a month ago) they took the individual macronutrients from milk and separated them and didn't get quite the same insulin response as they did with milk itself. The study also showed no real correlation between the fat content of the milk and the insulin response that was associated with its consumption. Definitely some interesting stuff!
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Old 11-13-2005, 02:35 PM   #9
Brian Hand
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Keep in mind that half the protein in milk is casein, half is whey. Whey is very quickly absorbed, casein is more slowly absorbed. Most people agree whey produces an insulin response.

The study Jesse mentions above is surprising, I know a few people that checked with their glucometers who found that adding olive oil or flax oil to their protein shakes blunted the blood sugar response. Hmmmm.....
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Old 11-13-2005, 07:50 PM   #10
Ian Holmes
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Brian,

It is actually an 80 20 split. 80% casein, the rest is whey.
Nikki,

As to post workout snacks, your body needs a big hit of carbs and fast digesting protein. The best combination at that point of time would be a whey, malto dextrin combination.

During the rest of the day you want to make sure you are getting a good combination of both fast and slow releasing proteins.

If you want really good info on this kind of stuff wander over to http://www.johnberardi.com/ and read some articles on proteins.
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