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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 07-31-2005, 02:54 AM   #1
Chris Kemp
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I saw this one on the DD board. Haven't finished reading through it yet but after reading the first paragraph, it seems pretty Crossfit.

http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/Competit...ce/yorkhb1.htm

cheers, kempie
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Old 07-31-2005, 10:39 AM   #2
James Taft
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Got to love those old school strength guys. Good resource. Thanks Chris

Jim
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Old 07-31-2005, 11:03 AM   #3
Robyn Joy
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Very cool! Today in my advanced yoga class we worked on coming into handstand on your fingertips -- very challenging (for me anyway, might depend on your hand strength). We also did an exercise where you are in a handstand and pop onto the fingertips of one hand while staying flat on the other and then reverse. This is not only a hand strengthener but supposedly a progression towards one-arm handstand, which my mega-strong female yoga teacher can do like it's nothing!
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Old 07-31-2005, 11:08 AM   #4
Tyler Hass
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Robyn,
That sounds like a cool yoga class. If you don't mind me asking, what style of Yoga is it?
Jordan Jovtchev showed me another fun drill. From a handstand, you lift one hand and touch it to your shoulder. Then you do the other hand and keep repeating. It looks sort of like running in place on your hands. I've also tried the fingertip drill and it is very helpful as well. One of the fun things about learning a one-arm handstand is all of the crazy falls you take. So far, I've fallen gracefully out of all of them, something I can only attribute to gymnastics training. Simple things like that amaze me, even moreso than the actual skills I learn.

Tyler
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Old 07-31-2005, 12:35 PM   #5
Robyn Joy
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Tyler,

I study with Jill Miller (www.jillmilleryoga.com) who mostly comes from the Ana Forrest tradition, but also studies with the amazing Glenn Black (who has worked with Pavel T. apparently) and the very hardcore Shandor Remete. Jill believes in exploring extremes of all forms of movement and her class is a combination of traditional asana, abdominal work and bodyweight exercises -- everything from hindu push-ups to "monk walks" (AKA 25 minutes of lunges) and then on to vinyasa flow. Although . . . it actually isn't Jill who does the one-arm handstands but her lovely assistant, Darcy.

I've tried a drill similar to what you're talking about -- but only against the wall so far! I wish I'd had more gymnastics training as a kid, because for me there was a lot of fear-conquering that had to go on just to get upside down, but it's amazing how even as an adult, grace and strength still come . . . . bit by bit!

Robyn
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Old 07-31-2005, 03:08 PM   #6
Erik Davis
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Hahaha, I love the first paragraph of that book.

Well, I love the rest of it, but the first bit made me laugh.
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Old 07-31-2005, 07:45 PM   #7
Mark Roughton
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Thanks for that link, Chris. There are some nice progressions in that booklet.

I have a question about a couple of the other books on that site about the "funtional isometric contraction system." One photo that struck me in particular was the second-to-last at the bottom of the following page, where a guy is pushing against a bar in the full clean position. Seemed like a good way to work on getting the elbows up:

http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/Competit.../ic-adv-02.htm

Reminded me of a picture in Dreschler's Encyclopedia in his chapter on flexibility (p. 175).

I haven't heard many coaches these days advocating the isometric stuff much, except maybe for a couple items by Dan John on using it once in a while to work through sticking points.

I'm just wondering, were the kinds of isometric exercises in those books mostly just a way to sell racks, or have they fallen out of fashion, or are they just not particularly effective? (It's certainly not the most fun way to exercise.) Do the good o-lifters still do that kind of isometric work with any frequency, or is the time and effort better spent in motion?
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Old 07-31-2005, 08:08 PM   #8
Mark Roughton
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(Just a quick note -- the more I look at the picture I'm talking about above, the worse it seems, because he's not actually in a full squat. It's more of a half squat. Seems like a good way to shoot his knee caps at unsuspecting bystanders. I'd modify that exercise so he's in a full squat, more like in the Dreschler picture. Probably couldn't do that with a chain, though, 'cause at that point the chain would be running right through the middle of his body. Hmmm.)
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Old 07-31-2005, 08:38 PM   #9
Matt McManmon
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Good info Robyn.

Been working on a one handed handstand myself but never knew that training technique. Thanks.
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Old 07-31-2005, 10:13 PM   #10
Roger Harrell
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Warning: picky CF gymnastics coach comments coming.
(note: I skimmed, but must comment as to prevent folks from heading down ineffient paths).
The "ideal" handstand is now to have a completely straight line from wrist to ankle. There should be a slight hollowing of the body, no arch at all, shoulders fully open and head between the arms. ALL hanstands in this article are shown with the head way to far out and too much arch in the back. This requires far more strength to hold long handstands, and will greatly reduce your ability to turn while in the handstand. Work on your handstands being very tall and very straight.

Now, with that being said, I also encourage playing with many different positions in the handstand. Know what different positions feel like, and how to stay in the handstand while doing them. But always keep in mind that the most efficient handstand is totally straight.
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