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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 11-23-2005, 12:54 AM   #1
Gary Jackson
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I did the recent max DL in a slightly different way: I took the bar off the rack from a standing position, lowered it to a touch and then deadlifted it back up. I found that I could actually lift 20 pounds more using this method as opposed to starting from the ground, lifting and then returning to the ground. Does anyone see any advantages or disadvantages to this?
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Old 11-23-2005, 05:56 AM   #2
Jesse Woody
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That's interesting. I would imagine that it might have something to do with the stretch reflex of your muscles affecting maximum contraction, sort of like plyometrics. I'll have to give it a try sometime and see how it works out.
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Old 11-23-2005, 06:00 AM   #3
Allen Yeh
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I always found that the touch and go method afforded me somewhat of a bounce and tend to not use it for that reason. Also I found my form is not what it should be.
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Old 11-23-2005, 06:10 AM   #4
Larry Lindenman
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I would use this sparingly and not really call this a PR. There is a reason it's called the "deadlift". Also, deadlifts from the ground have crossover to the O-lifts. Not bad for overloading the concentric motion, but stick to the "dead" part most of the time.
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Old 11-23-2005, 06:47 AM   #5
John Walsh
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Disadvantage: This is not really a deadlift. Dead means pulling a dead weight from the floor, no preload, no momentum, no bounce. The deadlift is a grind lift not an explosive lift. It builds a different kind of strength. I’ve done them but from my experience I think that any kind of touch and go deadlift is a bad idea especially when you are pulling over 400 pounds. It quickly turns into an arm pull with a hunched over back. Not good. It pays to take a few seconds to reset, get good form and hit another rep. Of course I’m not an expert just a guy that trains in the obscurity of his garage.
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Old 11-23-2005, 09:24 AM   #6
Gary John
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Timely topic. I'm going to start a program that Dave Witt turned me on to. 3 sets of 10 at 65% of 1RM. It is as always another modified Westside.

I've been doing the old 5x5 add 10# when you get all 25 for the deadlift. My form used to get sloppy on a triple, so I had to work hard on good form. With a set of 10, this is going to require lots of concentration.

To fit all that into the topic. I think the deadlift, for me, is best for total body strength. It is all the getting tight, pre-setting the pull and then the grind out of the hole that makes this a great lift.
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Old 11-23-2005, 01:02 PM   #7
Gary Jackson
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Thanks for the feedback. I imagine you are correct about the bounce/preload. I also appreciate the comments about resetting. I'll go back to doing the traditional DL.
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Old 11-23-2005, 08:23 PM   #8
Gregory Spilson
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Don't want to divert attention from your original post, Gary, but I do have a question pertaining to the deadlift. Does anybody know the root (or validity) of the whole "The deadlift burns out your CNS" hooplah? I've heard this preached by Louie Simmons and a few others. I can't quite figure out why. Olympic lifters pulls every day, with a greater ROM.
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Old 11-23-2005, 08:46 PM   #9
Gary John
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Don't really know, but for me, I do believe. I did that 3 sets of 10 right after posting here. Fried some circuits. Toast as in burnt.

I do know that the slight nausea you get with a hard workout hits me fast with the deadlift. I'm always weak on root causes and complex reasons. In most science, everything you know is wrong, if you wait five years.
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Old 11-23-2005, 09:36 PM   #10
Steve Shafley
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Gary, are you sure it's not 10 sets of 3?

Did we already talk about this? WSB almost never advocates sets of 10 around that percentage, preferring to do lower rep sets with each rep done as fast as possible.
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