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Old 07-12-2007, 08:02 AM   #11
Matt DeMinico
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Thanks Arden, that's more of what I'm looking for, people at the top of their game. I know that anyone can participate and compete until the day they die, but I don't want to just be another player, I want to stinkin' win.
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:02 PM   #12
Veronica Carpenter
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Matt, if you want it bad enough, there shouldn't be anything holding you back. :-)
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Old 07-12-2007, 11:06 PM   #13
Kat Campise
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I'm 33, I outlast the teenagers and the 20 somethings who come into the Muay Thai gym. I train twice per day 3-4 hours per day. Here are only some factors I can think of off the top of my head:

1. I train with a purpose in mind (endurance, power, speed, technique...)
2. I've been an athlete since the age of 9 (always playing sports...training for something)
3. I don't allow the experience of injury to injure my current training regime (I don't psyche myself out about a serious injury I've had...I've experienced only one, but I couldn't walk for 10 weeks, so that is a pretty hard impact for someone who feels anxious when she takes ONE rest day).
4. Because of my experience in sports, I know that even professional athletes must balance training and other areas of life (if they don't they usually do burnout early, even if brilliantly, after all most sports have an on season and an off season/macro/micro cycles).
5. I'm always learning new sports (I get bored quickly and easily, though martial arts tend to keep me busy).

oh yeah, and Crossfit is definitively woven with all of the things I mentioned above (at least, for me!!).

Now, I cannot predict where I'll be on this endurance scale when I hit my 40's and 50's. I'll cross(fit) that bridge when I get there.
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Old 07-13-2007, 09:21 AM   #14
Kellee Rassau
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As for ice hockey goaltenders, if a person is serious about their sport and seeks an elite fitness level, you can hang with the young kids well into your 40's. Even at the pro level. Avoiding key injuries is vital, bad knees, groin injuries, back injuries can really cause problems. Otherwise, experience is king as goaltender. The more you play the more you see, and the more you see on the ice the less you are caught by surprise. The fewer the surprises, the better goalie one tends to be. I'll take on any 20 year old goalie any day on a level playing rink, even at my advanced age of 35. Plus, older goalies tend to have better mental/emotional stability, and knowledge of the dirty 'tricks' players throw at you. So we don't get as many silly penalties, and are not as prone to take the bait from pesky forwards.
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Old 07-14-2007, 10:07 PM   #15
Steve Serrano
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Thanks for your input Milton.

At our affiliate one of our most capable athletes is 56 years old and can only be described as incredible. Bob has a gymnastics background and a history of lifetime fitness in moderation. He is about 170#/5'7" and his warm ups include handstand push ups and consecutive muscle ups which he does as smooth as silk.

His ranges of motion are outstanding for any age group and he uses prescribed weights in all WODs. He gets 22 rounds with a weighted vest (20#) in Cindy and has done completely respectable times in everything from Michael to Murph.

While we still suspect there is a bionic man component to Bob that we're missing, he remains a great motivator for us all to keep kicking butt.
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Old 07-15-2007, 05:01 AM   #16
Brad Davis
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As someone else mentions, I think a big factor is "having a life." With family, kids, challenging jobs, etc., most folks past about 25 have little time to train--and sleep. I can't remember the last time I got more than 7 hours of sleep.

Those "you have to have 9.5 hours of uninterrupted sleep in a pitch black room" threads crack me up.

Just have to take what life throws at us and keep marching forward.
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:30 AM   #17
Matt DeMinico
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Brad, I think that's one of the things about our culture, we prioritize our schedules, instead of schedule our priorities. We've got so much crap going on in our life that's worthless in the long term. We work 60+ hour weeks, typically drive at least a half hour to and from work (because heaven forbid we actually live near where we work like people used to), etc... Lots of things that waste our time and no time to do things that better ourselves or make any difference in the long run. I mean, how many people honestly read two to three good books a month (and I'm not talking about the latest novel)?
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Old 07-15-2007, 11:12 AM   #18
Brad Davis
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Matt,

Your avatar is one of the coolest I've seen.

I agree with you in most respects. That's why I quit my nasty work week job to go back to school at 34. After I graduate, I should be able to get into jobs that are more conducive to long term sanity.

However, there are still unavoidable (very high worth) challenges like losing sleep to take care of children. We still have to have A job, also. Young athletes don't usually deal with this stuff.

In the end, I'm not sure how to categorize what's worthless and what's not. Some would say that taking care of our physical bodies should be a low priority because our spirits only dwell in them a brief moment. Yet another advantage to short workouts!

I'm about to get above my philosophy paygrade, so I'll stop with that.
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Old 07-15-2007, 02:15 PM   #19
Milton Grasle
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I can sympathize with anyone who is young, raising a family, building a career, and all the other multiple tasks and responsibilitues that face both men and women today. Life is fast paced and those responsibilities mentioned above are extremely important. But that's what really fascinated me about X/F when I first heard about it. Here was an intense workout that could be done in usually thrity minutes or less. Many of the exercises were body weight stuff and a lot of others could be done with an average set of dumbells and barbells. You could hang a ten dollar pullup bar in a doorframe and get a pretty good workout. And...as simple as the X/F program sounded it worked! And I agree with Matt, many of us have some crap in our life that we could get rid of...if we want to.
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Old 07-15-2007, 09:33 PM   #20
Skip Chase
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It's a myth. However, we have all been conditioned to 'slow down' and prepare for death.

When it comes to sports which generate high revenue, the athletes are 'turned out to pasture' at a relatively young age. Football, baseball, hockey, basketball, soccer....horse racing. The athlete is there to make money and make money for the owner. When your value declines, you are forced to retire.

Just 150 years ago, we did not retire. We worked the farm, maintained the family business until we died.

One of the sports that 'lives on' way past our prime is rodeo. www.seniorrodeo.com. They ride rough stock into their 60's and 70's. Most of the competitors own 'working ranches' and they rope and break horses and ride rough stock til they die. It's not for money. It's their lifestyle. You can't find a fat, deconditioned rodeo hand. Some of the bulldoggers (steer wrestlers) are big boys, but they are in good shape. I rode bulls till I was 48.

Never is there a legitimate reason to not remain fit and healthy. Family, career, responsibilities are an excuse. Society has become lazy. It is a conditioned behavior.

150 years ago we had to work. Look at the old pictures from 150 years ago. It is rare to see an overweight person in the picture.

We are all conditioned. Conditioned by society. Shoot, just 50 years ago we had to actually get off our butt and walk over to the TV to change the channel.

I am 55 and in the best condition of my life since my military days. Last week I established a new PR for the Deadlift-405. I weigh 172. 2 weeks ago I did Murph in 59 minutes, wearing a 20# vest. 29 rounds of Cindy.

Can I still run a 4.45 40 yard dash. I don't know. I haven't trained for it since the Seahawk tryout in 1977, but I bet with a little training I could burn a 4.7, the qualifier for a DB in the NFL.

One of the greatest challenges of our society are to change the conditioning and behavior of everyone. At Mt Baker CrossFit we are attempting to do that, one client at a time.

I could continue on this subject for hours. Perhaps, write a book. But, I've got to get to bed. Tomorrow.

www.mtbakercrossfit.com
www.mtbakercrossfitkids.bogspot.com
www.mtbakercommandokravmaga.com
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