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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 06-06-2007, 01:17 AM   #1
Brandon Oto
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So I finally went and got a number for my 500 meter... 1:42 at 6 feet and 160 pounds, male.

Any rowers out there -- how am I doing? Do I need to work on remedial technique or is this an acceptable time? What would be a good goal for my height/weight?
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Old 06-06-2007, 05:37 AM   #2
Brett Sammis
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The nice thing about the C2 is that you can compare those numbers to folks all over the world. You can see how you match up to the people competing in the crash-B's (the World Series of Erging) here:

http://www.crash-b.org/results-index-2007.htm

Although those #'s are for a 2K row. Here's an arbitrary event off the C2 website for the 500.

http://www.rockymountainrowing.com/s...sults2007.html

Depending on what age group you're in it looks like you were respectable, but with room for improvement.

bts

*All links w/f safe*
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:41 AM   #3
Michael Tong
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Brandon,

Age and weight brackets matter more than height when doing peer-comparisons but I understand where you were coming from. Check out this link as well. (WFS)

http://www.concept2.com/sranking03/rankings.asp

Punch in your stats and compare scores from around the world. You can see current scores and scores from years past. Plus, some of the folks posted pics of themselves, so you could try to find someone of similar physique for even closer comparison.

BTW, I agree with Brett... 1:42 is a very respectable time. The trick now is to get the time down, when each second gets exponentially harder. A sub-1:30 is always a great time and goal, no matter what your age/weight bracket.
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Old 06-06-2007, 07:53 AM   #4
Tom Rawls
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Brandon--

3 questions:

What was the average strokes per minute for the row?
What was your average for the final 100 meters compared to the first 100 meters?
Depending upon the machine you used, you still be able to find both of these on the "memory" function of the C2 monitor.
What damper setting/drag factor did you use?
Knowing those basics, one might be able to offer some advice on how to improve your time.
A goal in the mid-1.30s would be reasonable for you.
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Old 06-06-2007, 12:45 PM   #5
Jason Fryer
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I'm curious what resistance setting these times are achieved on. I have only ever rowed on "10" and my best time for 500m was 1:46:07.

Fortunately I've only rowed about 10 times and am only 1 and a half months into CrossFit so I KNOW I have room for improvement :-)
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Old 06-06-2007, 01:29 PM   #6
Gorm Laursen
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1:42 is a good time. When it comes to the 'rhythmic' cardio movements like running and rowing, I have found that it is very helpfull to first find the kilometers pr. hour or in this case strokes per minute that'll get you to your desired time, and simply work out with those parameters. Start out with doing 200 meters at X strokes per m. and increase distance as you shapen up. Slowly you'll eat the distance until you're there. If you have a MP3-player, find a tune that has the same rhythm and use that as a pacer.

For the records I did 1:32 the third time I ever rowed, but then again: I'm long limbed and that is apparently a good thing ...
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Old 06-06-2007, 02:30 PM   #7
Brandon Oto
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MIchael -- age 20. And thanks, I'm messing around with that site now.

Tom -- I'll get those numbers next time. My damper's usually about 4; this time I believe I went slightly lower, and honestly the pulling felt oddly easy. I don't know if it was in my head, or that particular erg was a little tweaked, or a minor damper difference really was noticeable; and I don't know if it improved, harmed, or didn't impact my time. I'll try messing with it another day.

Is the usual method of improving your time to increase your strokes per minute, or increase the power of each stroke?
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Old 06-06-2007, 04:58 PM   #8
Tom Rawls
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Brandon--

For a 500, lots of people increase the stroke rate up to the high 30s and also increase the damper a bit--try 5. At high stroke rates, you can get a slightly firmer "catch" w/ a higher drag if your technique is imperfect.

You don't necessarily pull harder, but you do pull faster and that surely feels harder. It's not uncommon to use a slightly shorter stroke for the 500.

You can train for the 500 in part by doing short intervals. Common examples are doings a set of 20 intervals, 20 seconds on, 40 off. Or two or three sets of 10 intervals of 10 strokes on/10 strokes paddling. Try to do these intervals at 500 meter pace.

At 6', 160, you're about the size of a typical lightweight rower.



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Old 06-06-2007, 05:13 PM   #9
Connie Morreale
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brandon..if you are interested... have you checked out the crossfit trophy case. some awesome times are posted there.
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Old 06-06-2007, 05:39 PM   #10
Andy Rogers
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Not trying to hijack this thread, but I have a follow up question regarding damper settings. I've also only ever rowed at "10". Should I be dialing down the damper setting for a specific kind of gain/metcon response? Is "10" fine for general fitness purposes?

Some personal info: Male, 72 inches, 190 lbs, 13% BF. I generally only row for warm up or to sub out running/biking interval training for something indoors when the weather is particularly harsh (I from Alaska).

Stay at "10"?
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