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Equipment Outfitting a serious gym. Vendors & suppliers. Devices & equipment

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Old 07-14-2006, 07:44 PM   #1
Rod Gates
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As a newcomer hoping to gradually equip a home gym I have a question regarding barbells. I understand the importance of quality for lifts involving rotation of the weights on the barbell. However, I am wondering if I could start with a cheaper bar as I learn squats and deadlift? Then as I later work on the other lifts I could spring for a nice bar. That would give me two to use during those workouts where changing weights back and forth would slow me down. So, how important is barbell quality for squats and does my reasoning make any sense in the real world? Thanks!
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Old 07-14-2006, 09:12 PM   #2
Will Nuse
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I see where you're coming from. I think most people initially get a good Olympic bar since that really saves money in the long run since you can use it for everything. It's just when people try and use the crappy bar that they should be using for squats and bench press for Olympic lifting that you run into problems. I personally would save my money and get a good Oly bar and bumpers since the lifts are so foreign to most people we need a lot more practice to learn them well.

This is just opinion here, I'm no expert. Others will chime in, I'm sure.
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Old 07-15-2006, 03:49 AM   #3
Travis Loest
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Rod,
I'm thinking the same thing you are, get a cheaper bar for the bench/squat/deadlift exercises and get a really good quality bar for the clean/C&J/snatch exercises. I'm sure the retailer will tell you that you are better off buying two nice bars but I think it really is personal preference. I am currently deployed and have been really researching the cost of a really nice Crossfit gym in my garage and I've run into the same issue, for now I am going with the 1 good bar/1 crap bar, and when I'm able to pack on enough weight on the crap bar that it will make a difference I will probably buy another nice one. To me it really sounds like it would make more sense. I couldn't imagine doing "linda" with only one bar, changing weights would be more of a workout. Hope I didn't ramble too much and hope it helps.
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Old 07-15-2006, 04:03 AM   #4
Rod Gates
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Thanks for the input. Right now I am mainly hoping to learn good technique and will likely only use the bar weightless for several months anyway. I am needing to increase flexibility and see how my body adapts given a history on many lower extremity overuse injuries (hamstring strains, shin splints, runner's knee, sub-patellar pain, plantar fasciitis...you get the idea). I hate the thought of putting lots of money into equipment and later realizing (hopefully not) that I may never be able to really get into Crossfit due to nagging injuries. A cheaper bar for now will give me time to ease into learning technique, and allow me to improve strength and flexibility, hopefully drastically reducing my propensity for overuse type injuries. THEN...I could spring for a nicer bar as I start adding plates...someday. Any additional input?
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Old 07-15-2006, 06:41 AM   #5
Jonathan Leung
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I support the two bar route. I own a York Intl. bar and a Texas Power bar.

1. I never let my "good bar" touch the rack. The rack will mess up the bar's knurling.

2. Two bars is a lot more convenient when you're doing circuit training or supersetting.

Go for it man..
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Old 07-15-2006, 07:45 AM   #6
Lewis Dunn
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Rod, I'd say by all means start with a crappy bar. You can get one for very cheap and, even when you upgrade to a better one, the cheap one will be useful for empty bar warmups and many other uses. I'm all for getting a good bar eventually if you know you're in it for the long haul and you start adding weights, but it sounds like you're a perfect candidate for starting with something cheap. I appreciate my better bar for several movements (C&J comes to mind), but for many others (including squats) I don't care which bar I'm using.

Craigslist seems to always have Oly sets for very low prices. Save your money for bumpers!

(Message edited by lewis_d on July 15, 2006)
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