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Old 11-09-2009, 01:43 AM   #1
Mick Byrne
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Tennis Elbow

Hi,

Anyone had any success with getting this cured?

Should I try a Band-It thingy?

I have had this around 4 weeks now and not really improving.

Cheers,

Mick
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:35 AM   #2
Jon Clingenpeel
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Re: Tennis Elbow

The biggest thing is rest, stay away from exercises that aggrevate it. You should probably stop your upperbody training for 2 weeks, try focusing more on your lower body and core. Ice it and massage it. This is Steven Low's (he is a regular poster here and has helped me greatly get through my golfers elbow) link (wfs) http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2009/08/on-tendonitis/
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Old 11-09-2009, 08:44 AM   #3
Steven Low
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Basically what he said.

Read the link and implement that protocol and it should resolve.. unless you reaggravate so don't do any serious moving with your arms. Work on other weaknesses.
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Old 11-11-2009, 08:45 AM   #4
Stephen Lipa
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Re: Tennis Elbow

You know, I wish I would have read that info several months ago. I have tennis elbow and after reading through that link, it looks like mine is now chronic tendinitis. This happened because I tried to push through the injury, which I knew was a bad idea, but I did it anyway. So now, I may be stuck with it. I also have a toe injury, so I am hoping to be able to recover from that being that I am little wiser now (I hope).
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Old 11-11-2009, 10:07 AM   #5
Mike Howells
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Re: Tennis Elbow

I would say this before resigning yourself to the idea that you have chronic tendonitis - make sure it's not referred pain.

After suffering from seemingly incurable inner elbow pain for nearly 6 weeks I thought for SURE that I had escalated a case of tennis elbow to something that might require surgery. It was not until I developed pain in my OTHER elbow that a lightbulb lit up over my phyiso's head and he suggested some posture exercises and started working on my neck. Turns out I probably had a pinched nerve right around my C7 vertebra that was referring right down to my elbows. Now my posture is improved and my elbows are fine. I had been through weeks of wearing wrist braces and tennis elbow bands, icing and taking ibuprofen to no seeming effect.

Just something to consider.

Last edited by Mike Howells; 11-11-2009 at 10:09 AM..
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Old 11-15-2009, 10:44 AM   #6
Andrew Roden
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Re: Tennis Elbow

I have outside of the elbow issue. Started when the wife talked me into joining a bowling league. Kipping pullups and cleans don't hurt me but bowling does Grip feels weak and moderate pain when lifting with pronated grip also some discomfort when rotating forearm from inside to outside. Does this sound like tendonitis?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 11-15-2009, 02:10 PM   #7
Steven Low
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Re: Tennis Elbow

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Originally Posted by Andrew Roden View Post
I have outside of the elbow issue. Started when the wife talked me into joining a bowling league. Kipping pullups and cleans don't hurt me but bowling does Grip feels weak and moderate pain when lifting with pronated grip also some discomfort when rotating forearm from inside to outside. Does this sound like tendonitis?

Thanks in advance.
If the pain is at either the lateral or medial epicondyle then most like 99% yes.

Read the above link... er rather I'll just repost

wfs
http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2009/08/on-tendonitis/
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Old 11-19-2009, 02:43 PM   #8
Suzie Freeman
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Re: Tennis Elbow

There's a couple quick tests to check for tennis elbow.
1. You are tender to touch at the outside point of the elbow.
2. Hold your wrist up (in extension) and push down with the other hand. (Pushing on the middle finger might be especially painful).
If these tests, or if gripping items (especially when your elbow is straight) are painful, there's a good chance that you have tennis elbow. Now, you have to decide if it is inflamed or if it is a chronic tendinopathy. If you recently did something to strain it (like a week ago) and ice and advil helps, then it probably is inflamed ("tendonitis"). However, it is more common that these problems are longer lasting and go through these "good day/bad day" phases.

As medical imaging has improved, we can now see that most of the time, these problems are due to degenerative changes within the tendon. As a result of repetitive strain, the body tries to heal itself, but it does so in an inferior manner. Healthy tendon can be replaced by scar tissue, which is disorgainized, weak, and more prone to future problems. Even the blood vessels are different in degenerative tendons, not delivering healing blood products to the deep portions of the tendon. There are several treatments being performed and researched that use the preceding facts as their base. One of these tedchniques is performed by certified physical therapists and is called ASTYM. Practitioners use special instruments to identify and treat the dysfunctional tissue described above. The second very important part is that the patient must perform stretching and (usually eccentric) strengthening exercises so that the tendon fibers heal in a linear, organized and strong fashion. Certified therapists can be found across the country and should be getting the 90% success rate I quoted above. I have treated my own patients with ASTYM for over 4 years and have been getting great results, with my tennis elbow clients. Good luck!
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Old 11-27-2009, 02:00 AM   #9
Mick Byrne
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Quick update;

Band-It helps relieve the symptons.

Saw a Physio last night and he did lots of painful friction work and gave me some exercises to stretch and strengthen. My understanding is that this will help the new tissue be laid down correctly and not just a mess of scar tissue.

Later,

Mick
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Old 11-27-2009, 09:45 AM   #10
Jake Thompson
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Howells View Post
I would say this before resigning yourself to the idea that you have chronic tendonitis - make sure it's not referred pain.

After suffering from seemingly incurable inner elbow pain for nearly 6 weeks I thought for SURE that I had escalated a case of tennis elbow to something that might require surgery. It was not until I developed pain in my OTHER elbow that a lightbulb lit up over my phyiso's head and he suggested some posture exercises and started working on my neck. Turns out I probably had a pinched nerve right around my C7 vertebra that was referring right down to my elbows. Now my posture is improved and my elbows are fine. I had been through weeks of wearing wrist braces and tennis elbow bands, icing and taking ibuprofen to no seeming effect.

Just something to consider.

This is very common missed diagnosis, if you do the resisted middle finger ext and have increased pain during and following its most likely tendonopathy (osis should be used instead of itis).


Ask your PT about abducted ulna, there are a handfull of PTs that understand the arthrokinematics and its role in this issue. Yes friction massage, US, eccentrics are all recommended here, but if there is an issue with movement at the wrist or elbow the problem will never be solved. It will come and go feel better and flare up, become chronic, have need for surgery with little to no improvement.

Try this, take both hands and try and touch your shoulder with elbows at side. Does the one that hurts feel restricted/blocked? Give it some over pressure and compare that movement to the other side. This is an indication but not a diagnosis for abducted ulna.

Email me if you have any specific questions.
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