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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 09-10-2014, 02:34 PM   #11
Luke Sirakos
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

But is there a problem with squatting with toes slightly out? I am yet to see a heavy squatter that has feet straight forward.

If you have issues with feet straight but not slightly out I see no reason to try and squat feet straight. Starrett is a smart guy but he isn't the total authority either.
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Old 09-10-2014, 02:49 PM   #12
Dare Vodusek
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

Id look in olympic lifters for reference, power lifters are not really at the same level as they are when comparing professionalism:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_e6bFRKi0M
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I guess it is OK if we go with that logic
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Originally Posted by Rick Scarpulla
Toughness is a state of mind not a size.

Last edited by Dare Vodusek : 09-10-2014 at 03:03 PM.
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Old 09-10-2014, 02:54 PM   #13
Luke Sirakos
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

Maybe it is the angle but his feet definitely look to be turned out slightly to me. They sure aren't straight ahead.
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Old 09-10-2014, 03:03 PM   #14
Dare Vodusek
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

Yes: https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.n...10881976_n.jpg
Wfs
I meant its OK to have toes slightly out if we go with the logic that the best oly lifter is doing it so it must be correct.
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Originally Posted by Rick Scarpulla
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:14 PM   #15
Jan Dahlberg
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

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Originally Posted by Dare Vodusek View Post
Its not 1 dude, its a well educated doctor. Are you saying that coaches that are not educated doctors know better?
So, you are implying that a coach can't learn biomechanics?
But, on a more serious note, he has a point about losing force if you turn the feet too much out. Is 10-15 degrees too much? I don't think so and neither does the majority of the powerlifting community, olympic lifting community or pretty much anyone other than Kelly and the ones that are close by.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:56 AM   #16
Dare Vodusek
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

I believe its not the toes out thats causing the issue, its the instability of the ankle and loosing the foot's arch and torque?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSvKRmwXhwc WFS

Its biomechanically "easier" to lock foot, ankle and created better torque with straight feet.
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Old 09-11-2014, 07:42 PM   #17
Chris Sinagoga
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

First off, feet straight(ish) is what Kelly and crew recommends. I believe he said something like 5-12 degrees. The more straight the feet, the more torque you can create at the hip. Test it for yourself: stand with your feet straight, plant your big toe in the ground, and squeeze your butt and quads. Do this again with your feet pointed out a little bit, then again with them exaggerated (like 45 degrees or more). See if you can tell the difference. And as Carl states in his book, free+style, the wider your stance is the more your feet will turn.

It all comes down to maintaining a stable foot, stable hip, and stable spine.

Now as for the crunching, I would ask what your purpose is for squatting? The answer to that may be different from week-to-week or session-to-session, but it is something to think about. To me, by squatting with your feet straight(ish) you are reinforcing a stable position that will eventually translate into other things.

I would recommend cutting your weight and range of motion for most workouts so you can gradually build up the mobility to get "full range." And in the meantime, work on mobility for hip flexion + internal rotation, ankle/calf/bottom of foot, and terminal knee extension.
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Old 09-12-2014, 01:15 AM   #18
Jay Roberts
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

Thanks for all your valuable replies, folks. I really appreciate it.

I agree with the discussion. My feet were never turned out super far - maybe 15 - 20degrees, and I've never had much problem with mobility or range of motion. Was able to squat nearly 1.5BW like this without regularly training heavy squats and never had any issues (including foot instability) when I did.

If I turn my feet out even 10 degrees or so, the crunching reduces radically. So I'm thinking the best path is to find the angle that balances minimal crunching with max torque, so I get the best of both worlds.

Once again, I appreciate all the perspectives and the common sense. Cheers
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Old 09-12-2014, 07:39 AM   #19
Danny Bostwick
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

So, hows your ankle mobility? Hip external rotation? Adductor length? The straight foot squat is awesome if you have the mobility for it and understand the biomechanics. I have been a starret groupie since the inception of Mobility Project almost. All of the systems have to be in place, the knee is a hinge joint and any lateral movement or rotation ain't good. Only go that straight foot stance if your mobility is in check, your arch is raised up, toes are on the ground and your screwed in, squeezing your butt keeping a vertical shin angle.
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Old 09-13-2014, 11:46 AM   #20
Michael Lennox
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Re: Knee crunching with straight feet in squat

I had knee cracking awhile back. Someone tuned me to hip thrust, 3 sets of high reps and for some weird reason it worked. It's a great exercise regardless if you don't already do them.
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