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Equipment Outfitting a serious gym. Vendors & suppliers. Devices & equipment

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Old 01-31-2007, 02:46 PM   #1
James Besenyei
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Just curious if any of you with a C2 rower could tell me how much resistance is available on the rower, and how much of a difference there is between the highest & lowest resistance settings? I ask b/c the crappy rower at the Y (don't remember the brand) offers me no challenge whatsoever, so I don't use it. C2 seems like a great product, and I've read so many good reviews about them, here and on other sites, that I am willing to invest in one as part of my effort to outfit my garage gym. I just want to make sure that the level of resistance is gonna' be sufficient. Sorry 'bout the diatribe
there:tmi:!

Any info. will be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

--Jim.
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Old 01-31-2007, 02:54 PM   #2
Bruce Kocher
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James: The CII is pretty much the sport standard among competitive rowers. The resistence is variable to best simulate a boat on the water. At the heaviest resistence you still won't be weight lifting but you will bog down the flywheel pretty quickly. Most people row with the resistence around the 4-6 setting on the model C and something similar on the D model. It's a little lighter but allows a quick fluid movement.

FWIW, the performance monitor on the rower calibrates the rate of deceleration and gonkulates drag to work to watts to pace or calories. Or at least the last time I knew much about these machines that's the way they worked. So you can set the resistence at 10 or 1 and the machine is still going to give you a pretty accurate work measurement. Hope this helps.
B
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Old 01-31-2007, 03:12 PM   #3
Paul Findley
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I feel like I am rowing a boat in maple syrup on "10". To calibrate, the closest I have got to sub 1:30 500M is 1:34. I consider myself a rowing n00b. I don't think you will be dissapointed in the product.

Edit: Maybe you can find someone local, or ask C2 if they have outfitted any businesses or universities in your area with one you can try before buying.

(Message edited by paul on January 31, 2007)
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Old 01-31-2007, 09:33 PM   #4
Jeff Vale
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I have two model-b- questions for anyone out there. The model b doesn't have the numbers 1-10 on the damper. How do you know where to set it? Also, there are two sprocket that the chain can run on by the flywheel. Which one should I be using?
Thanks
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Old 01-31-2007, 09:50 PM   #5
James Besenyei
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Bruce, thanks for the quick reply. I really want this machine, and just wanted to make sure that the resistance is adequate. Interesting that it calibrates off of the deceleration.

Paul, I found one at another Y in my area, but when I called to make sure they still had it the front desk attendant told me it was not in working order anymore. I checked the list on the C2 site, and that Y was the closest to where I'm located. So, since you are new to rowing as well, let me ask you how good of a workout is it exactly? Do you do any "real world" rowing or is the C2 your first rowing experience overall? Just curious, I'm intrigued by the possibility of joining my local rowing club within the next few summers.

--Jim.
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Old 01-31-2007, 10:58 PM   #6
Andy Shirley
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Jeff,
Not sure, check the forums on the C2 website. They have a lot of good info.

James,
I just bought a C2 model D(about a month ago). The level of resistance is more than sufficient. Search the forum and read everything Chris Wyant has written, also check the Crossfit Live on the C2. Reams of good info. I have been spending a lot of time on my new toy, and have PR'd every distance since I got it. Also look into the drag factor settings, which are actually more accurate and transferable than the damper setting.

Also, the 500 is a completely different monster than the other distances. Shorter, faster, harder strokes. Gives the fan less time to slow down, you have to pull less hard to keep it at the same pace.

It has been well worth the investment.

You can also do workouts that aren't your standard timed distances. 3 sets of 10 100m sprints, 10 stroke max effort pulls for max watts/pace, row/pushup/situp triplets...

my workout log details my progress:
http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messa...054/27487.html

Most of the workouts are taken from here:
the following SFW links regarding C2 and rugby training:
http://www.concept2.co.uk/training/rugby.php
http://www.concept2.co.uk/training/rugby.php#guide
http://www.concept2.co.uk/docs/rugby_training_guide.pdf
http://www.concept2.co.uk/training/rugby_llanelli.php
http://www.concept2.co.uk/training/rugby_leeds.php
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Old 02-01-2007, 05:22 AM   #7
Bruce Kocher
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Jeff: The B model is truly a GPOG (good piece of gear). As I recall, my experience with the sprockets was that it didn't matter much. Pick the lighter pulling sprocket even if your pulling sub 6:00 2K pieces. This was a while ago but on the B model we emphasized lighter/faster to the point where we wrapped the perimeter of the cage with duct tape to reduce airflow. The performance monitor will calibrate and still give accurate watts etc.. Rowing at a wide open fan is harder and you don't have to pull as quickly to get big numbers but open or closed 1:30 500m is still the same amount of work and power.

Jim: I rowed competitively in college and very uncompetively since. It's a great sport, beautiful and tough. There are huge fitness holes in full time rowers though. IMHO, CrossFit is the cure and rowing with CrossFit is a powerful combination.
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Old 02-01-2007, 08:17 AM   #8
Jeff Vale
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Thanks Bruce and Andy! So the shorter the distance the, the less airflow? Does that sound right or do most people find one setting they are comfortable with and leave it no matter what the distance?
Bruce- You said pick the lighter sprocket. Does that mean the one with less resistance?
I know in the end I will just have to find what I feel good with, but I really appreciate the advice pointing me in the right direction.
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Old 02-01-2007, 09:01 AM   #9
Paul Findley
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James,

Shortly after getting hooked on Crossfit I started to look around for equipment. I read a lot about the C2 on the site. I went to a local play-it-again sports to see if they had bumpers or kettlebells (lol) and low and behold there was a C2 Model C for $350. I looked for wear and tear, saw none, pulled about 200M it seemed to work so I went ahead and bought it.

The first time I rowed was about a year ago. It is indeed a good workout. The sprints can be real a55 kickers and a 5k or a 10k row seems really close to a 5k or 10k run in both time and effort, but without feeling as beat up.
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Old 02-01-2007, 03:09 PM   #10
Bruce Kocher
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Jeff: The less airflow, the less resistence. For shorter distances some rowers like more airflow. They are betting on muscle endurance over anaerobic demise. Bigger rowers tend toward heavier (more airflow) fan settings for similar reasons. Bigger rowers in general can generate more power but are not as quick as lighter rowers so they tend to like a heavier fan and lower stroke rating. Lower stroke ratings allow more recovery per stroke and can be more sustainable. This only works if you still have the available strength to accelerate the flywheel back up to speed. As fatigue inevitably sets in, the heavier flywheel (more airflow) tends to bog down and you are now rowing in Paul's maple syrup.

From my casual observations it seems that most elite heavyweight rowers use a very medium fan setting. Obviously that varies with the body but they are seeking a resistence level that feels pretty light but where they don't have to row 40 spm to generate 1:30/500. Around the bottom of halfway on the B model and around 4-6 on the C.

On the ligher/heavier sprocket discussion I always get my levers confused. Just my own personal learning disability but as I recall the smaller sprocket is like the smaller ring on the rear freewheel of a bike, more distance moved at the perimeter per stroke equals more power required equals more harder to pull or heavier.

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