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Old 12-22-2012, 12:17 AM   #1
Joseph Smyth
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Posterior Shoulder Issues

Hey folks-
Making a new thread because I feel like a lot of the other shoulder stuff doesn't directly address my problem- which is POSTERIOR shoulder instability / dislocations. I first injured my shoulder about 18 months ago, dislocated it to the posterior doing DB military press. Did the standard few weeks of PT afterwards, overall felt decent. Started crossfitting about 8 months ago and it hasn't been a huge hindrance. The only lift which really taxes my shoulder to the posterior is the snatch, and in fact I re-dislocated my shoulder two days warming up with a hang snatch of only 65 pounds. So now I am very worried about this becoming a recurring problem (if it hasn't already). I am writing to ask for any shoulder stabilization protocols specifically directed as posterior stability. Most stuff I have found deals with rotator cuff and stabilizing the shoulder against anterior dislocations, which, while certainly helpful, don't directly address my issue. Sorry for the long post, and thanks for listening.
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:04 PM   #2
Gravel Brown
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Re: Posterior Shoulder Issues

Hi Joseph,

If it's dislocating that can't be good. I'd be seeing a doc and possibly getting an MRI, that way you know exactly what you're dealing with and can set out a proper plan towards rehabbing it correctly.

It takes all the guess work out of the equation.

Im speaking from experience... I wasted 8 months chasing my tail before I finally got an MRI and realised I had a big tear requiring surgery. In hindsight I should have got the MRI way earlier.

Keep us posted on how it goes.
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Old 12-23-2012, 07:39 PM   #3
Steven Low
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Re: Posterior Shoulder Issues

Did you stop doing the PT work after you got discharged from PT?

If so, you really need to start doing the PT again as those exercises would help significantly.
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Old 12-23-2012, 09:17 PM   #4
Sean Rockett
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Re: Posterior Shoulder Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph Smyth View Post
Hey folks-
Making a new thread because I feel like a lot of the other shoulder stuff doesn't directly address my problem- which is POSTERIOR shoulder instability / dislocations. I first injured my shoulder about 18 months ago, dislocated it to the posterior doing DB military press. Did the standard few weeks of PT afterwards, overall felt decent. Started crossfitting about 8 months ago and it hasn't been a huge hindrance. The only lift which really taxes my shoulder to the posterior is the snatch, and in fact I re-dislocated my shoulder two days warming up with a hang snatch of only 65 pounds. So now I am very worried about this becoming a recurring problem (if it hasn't already). I am writing to ask for any shoulder stabilization protocols specifically directed as posterior stability. Most stuff I have found deals with rotator cuff and stabilizing the shoulder against anterior dislocations, which, while certainly helpful, don't directly address my issue. Sorry for the long post, and thanks for listening.
Typically for posterior dislocations you need to work on the posterior capsule and muscles associated with that which are the external rotators. Posterior instability is typically brought oin by bench press and flexion of the shoulder with adduction of the shoulder. My guess is you may be in fact dislocating INFERIORLY due to the positioning of the dumbbell military press and the hang snatch which do not stress the posterior capsule and more the anterior and inferior capsule. There is something called multidirectional instability where the shoulder can be loose in three direcitons.
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:53 AM   #5
Joseph Smyth
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Re: Posterior Shoulder Issues

Interesting- great feedback! Yes, I stopped the PT stuff once I felt pretty "back to normal" after my first location. Are there any special exercises I can work on to help out, or would a general shoulder stability program like Diesel Crew or 7-Minute solution work out?
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:26 PM   #6
Daniel Pope
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Re: Posterior Shoulder Issues

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Originally Posted by Sean Rockett View Post
Typically for posterior dislocations you need to work on the posterior capsule and muscles associated with that which are the external rotators. Posterior instability is typically brought oin by bench press and flexion of the shoulder with adduction of the shoulder. My guess is you may be in fact dislocating INFERIORLY due to the positioning of the dumbbell military press and the hang snatch which do not stress the posterior capsule and more the anterior and inferior capsule. There is something called multidirectional instability where the shoulder can be loose in three direcitons.
I'd have to agree with this statement, sounds like it might not be a posterior dislocation based on the nature of the lifts.

I'd also take a look at things like your overhead flexibility (T-spine, lats/pecs). If you don't have great flexibility overhead then all the stability work in the world won't decrease the stress you get because of poor flexibility. Snatches and overhead press require a tremendous amount of flexibility.

That being said I agree with Steven, continue with the PT exercises. If you aren't having pain I'd start incorporating more advanced exercises into your program like overhead kettlebell walking, bottoms up Kettle Bell overhead press.

Conclusion:
1: Ensure adequate overhead flexibility, don't do snatches and overhead press until this is cleared up - Here's an article on how to test yourself http://fitnesspainfree.com/?p=24

2: Continue PT exercises and incorporate more advanced crossfit specific shoulder stability exercises (Kettlebell bottoms up overhead press, overhead waiter walks, Plank variations, Handstand holds)

3: Smart programming, consider doing overhead work less often, substituting press variations for rowing, more rest days between training. Strict pullups over kipping, more rest during met-con
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