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Old 04-01-2012, 05:06 PM   #11
Steven Low
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Moore View Post
For what its worth, heat has done nothing for my chronic tendonitis. Ice on the other hand has allowed me to continue training.
Just heat alone won't do anything.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:05 AM   #12
Ron Thurston
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Re: Tennis Elbow

I have Tennis Elbow in one arm and Golfer's Elbow in the other (basically the inside of one elbow and the outside of the other). I have found that icing after a grip intensive workout (pullups, deadlifts, heavy farmer carries, etc) helps some but the only thing that has actually gotten rid of this for any meaningful length of time was a doctor using the Graston Technique.

Basically, he lubes up your elbow/arm and uses a stainless steel tool to rub the trigger points (they call it Scraping) and massage these same areas. How he explained it to me was that this breaks up all the scar tissue that has built up and becomes "sticky".

I was at the point where I couldn't pick anything up with an outstretched arm because of the pain in my elbow. Handshakes would also send a shooting pain right through it. After one treatment I felt a significant change and after my second visit it had all but disappeared.

See if there's a sports therapist near you who can do this. He will be your new best friend!

P.S. I see you're in Bear, DE. The guy I visit isn't an unreasonably long distance from you. You can check their practice out at (WFS) www.southjerseysportschiropractic.com.

P.S.S I also didn't notice this post was a year old, haha!

Last edited by Ron Thurston : 04-05-2012 at 09:10 AM.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:09 PM   #13
Brett Dartt
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Re: Tennis Elbow

I know it's not a fix eveything but this is like magic. Worked excellent for me. And i believe is what starret was getting to in previous posted video

http://glennpendlay.wordpress.com/20...ot-tendonitis/ WFS
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:49 PM   #14
Steven Low
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Graston is pretty brutal but it works in some cases if the tissue is super gummed up.

Glenn's thing can work a bunch, though it may not necessarily be a cure all depending on what the actual issue(s) are.
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Old 04-21-2012, 08:32 PM   #15
Pär Larsson
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Correct me if I'm wrong, please, and add to this list:

Movements that have a significant chance of hurting or making worse a Tennis Elbow issue:


Deadlifts (therefore also any type of cleans)
Farmers' Carry
KB Swings
Pullups
Rowing
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Old 04-21-2012, 09:08 PM   #16
Pär Larsson
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Re: Tennis Elbow

Trainer at FLETC was also saying that pushups can hurt due to the wrist position, made worse by doing them on a soft surface like some soft gym mats. Burpees and pushups both seem to not hurt me as long as I do them on my fists with a straight wrist, but not 100% sure that'll work long-term or for everyone. I might just not be feeling it very much but still delaying full healing, I guess.
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Old 04-21-2012, 10:03 PM   #17
Steven Low
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Re: Tennis Elbow

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Originally Posted by Pär Larsson View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong, please, and add to this list:

Movements that have a significant chance of hurting or making worse a Tennis Elbow issue:


Deadlifts (therefore also any type of cleans)
Farmers' Carry
KB Swings
Pullups
Rowing
More like.. anything that aggravates it.

I've seen people who didn't have any type of pulling movements hurt, except those with a pronated grip (so the medial epicondylitis would be due to pronator teres for exampel).... and not a supinated grip.

So it depends what is going on specifically.....

As a general theme anything with strong gripping or pulling movements typically aggravate it though.
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Old 04-22-2012, 10:19 AM   #18
Pär Larsson
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Re: Tennis Elbow

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Originally Posted by Ron Thurston View Post
I have Tennis Elbow in one arm and Golfer's Elbow in the other (basically the inside of one elbow and the outside of the other). I have found that icing after a grip intensive workout (pullups, deadlifts, heavy farmer carries, etc) helps some but the only thing that has actually gotten rid of this for any meaningful length of time was a doctor using the Graston Technique.

Basically, he lubes up your elbow/arm and uses a stainless steel tool to rub the trigger points (they call it Scraping) and massage these same areas. How he explained it to me was that this breaks up all the scar tissue that has built up and becomes "sticky".

I was at the point where I couldn't pick anything up with an outstretched arm because of the pain in my elbow. Handshakes would also send a shooting pain right through it. After one treatment I felt a significant change and after my second visit it had all but disappeared.
Not saying that "the Graston Technique" might not have worked for you. Not saying it might not work for me. Not saying that it's not worth investigating.

But... http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/...h-instruments/ SFW

Quote:
Summary of the Evidence

It really all boils down to a handful of mice pro, a handful of mice con, one human pilot study showing no advantage over manual mobilization, and a lot of testimonials. Would you be willing to try a new pharmaceutical treatment on the basis of nothing but one favorable mouse study out of two, and one pilot study? Would you agree to let someone deliberately injure you on such flimsy evidence? I would be very happy if the Graston Technique proves useful, but for the time being it must be considered experimental.
For now, I'm putting this in the same category as Chiropractic - may or may not work as advertised, for some but not other things, is more profit than proven medicine ("Sign up for a series of treatments!"), may work if you believe in it - because you believe in it, and may or may not be much more efficacious than just stretching and mobility work and physical therapy/strength work on your own.

More at http://saveyourself.ca/articles/real...-technique.php SFW

Quote:
Are the Graston tools like magic dowsing rods?

They are priced like it. They currently go for about $2500–3500 … for tools about as hard to manufacture as cutlery.

But perhaps they are worth it. The Graston Technique website makes some interesting claims about those tools. Strangest of all, right on their “about” page — always one of the most-visited pages on a website — they climb right out on a marketing limb and describe their massage tools as having spooky powers...

Summary

There may well be a kernel of truth in Graston Technique, and I would be interested in serious science looking for that kernel. I hope that Graston Technique will eventually be validated by new research — I would be delighted to endorse a new, proven method of treating stubborn pain problems. Three simple randomized controlled trials with at least 50 human subjects with clearly positive results would be sufficient to increase my confidence in Graston Technique® substantially.

However, I think it is unlikely that the results of such testing will be positive. Meanwhile, a vague and unsubstantiated theory is simply not adequate justification for such a severe approach to tissue — especially tissue that’s hurting to begin with.

Last edited by Pär Larsson : 04-22-2012 at 10:22 AM.
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Old 04-23-2012, 07:19 AM   #19
Arturo Garcia
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Re: Tennis Elbow

I seem to be very injury prone.... but I play tennis and have not developed tennis elbow ever. I'm somewhat relieved!

But my left arm (non-dominant) is very susceptible for Golfer's elbow. I have been getting stronger at wrist extension (very weak at it) but I doubt it's making me any less susceptible. I do notice my left wrist is quite a bit weaker than the right, in pretty much every direction (flexion, extension, pronation,supination, radial deviation and ulnar deviation).

I was reading lately that new theories might indicate that these "elbows" (golfers, tennis) might actually be due to UNDERuse than overuse. Sure, overusing it causes it, but because it's being underused, these people say. Which brought me back to around 2008 or so... I became a grip fanatic back then and was actively training grip/forearms quite a bit, including sledgehammer rotations and many other things. I think my elbows were healthier then. Coincidence? I attempted a few things grip-wise the otherday and I am considerably weaker than I used to be, at least with my left arm (the onegetting golfer''s elbow), so it's making me think if I should train it more instead of trying to rest it as much as possible. Perhaps the problem is just that: it's at rest too much, so when I put some stress on it it gets hurt? lol...
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Old 04-24-2012, 01:11 PM   #20
Arturo Garcia
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Re: Tennis Elbow

MORE FOOD FOR THOUGHT, for everyone.

I had an epiphany today so I thought I'd share. I don't think I've ever used that word, so I'm sorry if it's not appropiate, lol.

Now that my golfer's elbow is gone or pretty much gone.... I decided I'd train my wrists some more. I know there are 6 main movements one can train it at, and most rehab programs only have you doing some, but not all.

-Wrist extension: been doing some with DB's.
-Wrist flexion: had neglected it because I thought the forearm flexors are trained enough with regular whole body things, as one holds on to many things... but have included it now, realizing this was a mistake. It might work isometrically to an extent but I realized I had lost strength in wrist flexion, some plate wrist curls quickly made me realize this.

Now.... an old favourite of mine are sledgehammer rotations. I distintcly remember doing these a few years ago, and at the time (I had no elbow issues), I remember that I couldn't do the full rotation (180 degree movement) because I felt one way was much easier than the other. Back then, I remember that bringing the sledge from Supinated-to-Neutral I was considerably stronger than bringing it from Pronated-to-Neutral (Neutral being, the sledge's handle is vertical and the weight is up towards the ceiling). So I trained them sepparately, grabbing the sledge closer to the weight when doing the movement going from pronation-to-neutral (which I guess works the supinators).

Today I discovered I am almost of equal strength! I did some research and it seems one is actually supossed to be stronger at resisting pronation when fully supinated (as I used to be). I think that somehow my supinators got stronger, almost catching up to my pronators, and my pronators are not up to par. I wonder if this has anything to do with developing golfer's elbow?

Just throwing it out there to see if anyone has played with this. One of the most linked videos I found on different forums, etc., was to a guy swearing he cured golfer's elbow by doing eccentric pronations. He just grabbed a stick with weight at the end and did the negative, letting it fall to the outside (letting his forearm supinate, so working the pronators, but in the negative portion only). So this definitely leads me to believe that either weak pronators, or a pronation/supination imbalance might very well be responsible for golfer's elbow. Thoughts?

Pronation/supination is a natural movement we never train in the gym. We turn doorknobs and stuff but we don't train it. The other day I put together some Ikea furniture, and (as embarassing as itsounds) I had not used a screwdriver in a long time. Next day I had a deep soreness in that forearm. Lots of pronation/supination with a screwdriver. As the bicep is a supinator, most people work those a lot, with curls, chins, whatever. But what about the good ol' pronators? I'm kinda thinking we're all forgetting them. Of course, I have much to learn when it comes to anatomy, that is why I'm stating all of these as THOUGHTS seeking opinions, not facts. Go easy on me
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