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Old 02-16-2008, 07:22 PM   #1
Hasib Saliefendic
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For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Hi All,

I've read so many of these posts from those of you struggling with shoulder problems and I feel your pain. I've been having many of the same symptoms for months, that have been the "weak link" for me, and I am SO HAPPY that I've found something that has started to help me heal it!!!!!

IT IS:
The Frozen Shoulder Workbook by Clair Davies

This book is GREAT! everything you wanted to know about trigger point therapy and your shoulders. It is also a self-treatment guide. GREAT! GREAT! GREAT!!!!

Backing up a bit...

My symptoms have been:
* Sudden onset during sleep and poor sleep due to pain
* Sharp pains during activity in various positions, with and without weight
* Severely decreased range of motion and strength

Always aggravated by doing movements such as overhead presses, overhead squats, thrusters, handstands (handstand pushups? No way), push ups, dips.

I have tried massage therapy, all kinds of stretching, all the other rotator cuff and shoulder exercises referred to in other posts, ice, heat, etc.

I was afraid I really damaged them through lots of pullups, dips, and pushups, because that's essentially all I did before my trouble started.

Through all the stuff I've tried, it is really clear that Trigger Point Therapy EXACTLY describes what has been going on and after treating myself, the results are better than any other I have gotten.

Other equipment that I use:
1. A mini 7" basketball - picked it up for about $6 at my local Sportmart and inflated it to roll on. This is a great tool for deep massage and can be left slightly deflated until you can take more pressure. There are various special rollers you can buy, but for a few bucks and IMHO these work better.

2. A LaCrosse ball - $9 or so for a 3-pack at Big-5. Recommended in the book, these are hard rubber and don't compress like a tennis ball does when you put your weight on it, so it's perfect for digging into those trigger points.

I've been spending time every day working it, and you do need to know that it can be painful when you put pressure on the trigger points. However, the relief from pain, increased range of motion and strength CAN be almost immediate. I'm sure it will take me a few more weeks, but I am truly amazed.

If you have any doubts about a possible serious injury you should probably have it checked out.

The book was less than $13 bucks on Amazon and I bought it together with "Trigger Point Self-Care Manual" by Donna Finando. This book is not quite as detailed as the Frozen Shoulder Workbook, and I would choose another Clair Davies book next time.

RUN, DON'T WALK, To AMAZON!!!

I hope to hear that some of you find yourselves healing faster through this info.

Good Luck and I'd be happy to provide any more info.

Thanks.

Hasib
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Old 02-16-2008, 09:00 PM   #2
Theresa Meyer
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Did you have your shoulder(s) checked out by a doctor? I ask this because I've already been diagnosed with a small full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear, which I'm having fixed on Tuesday. Can you tell me if the book recommends these methods for post-op therapy?
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Old 02-16-2008, 11:17 PM   #3
Samuel Redwine
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Does it have anything for Brachial Plexus/Rucksack Palsy w/ scapular winging?
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Old 02-17-2008, 12:18 PM   #4
Hasib Saliefendic
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Hi Theresa,

I've had physical therapists and chiropractors look at it, but no other orthopedic specialists.

This is what I found in the book regarding your situation (sorry it's a bit long but it might be useful):

(p. 262-264)

"Contributing causes of rotator cuff tears are aging, trauma, falls, dislocations and fractures. Tendon tears generally occur more often in women and athletes, and genetics may play a role. As noted earlier, Travell and Simons believe that myofascial trigger points are the primary cause of impingement and the ultimate tearing of the rotator cuff.

The supraspinatus tendon is the part of the rotator cufff most often damaged by impingement by the head of the humerus. Compression of this tendon tends to cut off its curculation and undermine its ability to repair itself. Some physicians blame 95 percent of rotator cuff tears on subacromial compression and the ensuing loss of circulation in the area. Excessive subacromial compression also keeps the tendon from moving freely under the acromion when you move your arm. This puts added strain on the tendon when the supraspinatus muscle contracts.

Degeneration of the supraspinatus tendon begins with tiny tears of individual superficial fibers, then progresses to a detectible partial tear, most often on the tendon's upper surface (figure 10.38). Any remaining ability to raise or rotate your arm indicates only a partial tear, but ultimately an MRI or ultrasound must be used to determine whether a tear is partial or complete, or whether a tear actually exists. Since imaging is so costly, some physicians prefer to wait to see whether conservative treatment allows the tear to heal naturally. Studies show that nonoperative treatment is successful more than half the time, and one study showed a 92 percent success rate (Arroyo and Flatow 1999, 32-37).

Travell and Simons agree that partial tears in the rotator cuff can heal on their own, especially when aided by trigger point therapy to reduce stress on the subacromial area (Simons, Travell, and Simons 1999, 545). Surgical repair may be needed for complete tears in any of the rotator cuff tendons because normal muscle contraction retracts the torn tendon too far for self healing (figure 10.39).

There are two basic approaches to rotator cuff repair, arthroscopic surgery and open surgery. The arthroscopic method is used maily for the supraspinatus tendon. Opn surgery is usually reserved for the subscapularis and infraspinatus tendons. Dince the deltoid covers all parts of the shoulder and must be cut and moved aside for open surgery, the advantage to arthroscopy is that detachment of the deltoid muscle can be avoided (Arroyo and Flatow, 1999, 37-49).

The outcomes of surgery depends alm,ost exclusively on the ability of the surgeon. Surgical techniques are highly developed and well disseminated throughout the medical world, and if the surgeion is well-trained and experienced, the results are usually good. Things can go wrong, of course, with both arthroscopic and open surgery. The sutures can stretch or pull out, loose anchors in the humeral head can damage the joint, the deltoid muscle reattachment can tear loose, and nerves may be accidentally cut. Despite the risks, 80 percent of patients report relief of pain and improvement in function (Arroyo and Flatow, 1999, 46-53). A partially torn tendon is usually strong six weeks after surgery, and a full tear requires three months. In both cases, a careful regimen of physical therapy is advisable to minimize the risk of frozen shoulder."


There you go. While the book doesn't cover post-op treatment, based on the great information in the book about shoulders, I think you'd get a lot from the book given you'll be paying a lot of attention to your shoulders after something like this.

Good luck with your surgery and recovery.

Hasib
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Old 02-17-2008, 12:51 PM   #5
Hasib Saliefendic
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Hi Samuel,

The book doesn't specifically mention anything about brachial plexus palsy or scapular winging. However, it does have a section on the serratus anterior muscle, which appears to be one of the major muscles involved with scapular winging, so you may be able to find some useful information.

Here is a bit from the book that might be relevant to us crossfitters:

"When you need extra breath quickly, as in any vigorous activity, the serratus anterior muscles assist respiration by pulling on the ribs to expand the chest. For this reason, athletic exertion can quickly overtax these muscles, expecially when you're out of shape. It's usually amateur or weekend athletes who get a stitch in the side, not well-conditioned enthusiasts and professionals. Since the serratus anterior is so active in movements of the arm and shoulder, it's particularly vulnerable to unaccustomed participation in tennis, swimming, running, chin-ups, push-ups, weight lifting and workouts on the pommel horse or the flying rings.

Respiratory ilnesses that involve strenuous coughing can activate trigger points in the serratus anterior muscle, causing pain in your sides and back that can make you thing you're progressing to pleurisy or pneumonia. Habitual tension and hperventilation under emotional duress can activate latent trigger points in serratus anterior muscles. The pain they cause can make you fear the problem is workse than it really is, but the serratus anterior responds exceptionally well to self treatment."


Hey! This last paragraph describes me this week and yesterday. I've been ill and coughing like crazy, doing everything I can not to get pneumonia as I did a few years ago. Yesterday I barely made it through half the first round of "Annie Are You OK?" before needing to stop--I had no energy left and could barely catch my breath.

Hope that helps, and good luck.

Hasib
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Old 02-17-2008, 02:15 PM   #6
Theresa Meyer
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Thank you so much, Hasib. I'll order the book today!
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Old 02-18-2008, 03:08 PM   #7
Lenora Galitz-Pfeffer
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hasib Saliefendic View Post
Hi All,

I've read so many of these posts from those of you struggling with shoulder problems and I feel your pain. I've been having many of the same symptoms for months, that have been the "weak link" for me, and I am SO HAPPY that I've found something that has started to help me heal it!!!!!

IT IS:
The Frozen Shoulder Workbook by Clair Davies

This book is GREAT! everything you wanted to know about trigger point therapy and your shoulders. It is also a self-treatment guide. GREAT! GREAT! GREAT!!!!

Backing up a bit...

My symptoms have been:
* Sudden onset during sleep and poor sleep due to pain
* Sharp pains during activity in various positions, with and without weight
* Severely decreased range of motion and strength

Always aggravated by doing movements such as overhead presses, overhead squats, thrusters, handstands (handstand pushups? No way), push ups, dips.

I have tried massage therapy, all kinds of stretching, all the other rotator cuff and shoulder exercises referred to in other posts, ice, heat, etc.

I was afraid I really damaged them through lots of pullups, dips, and pushups, because that's essentially all I did before my trouble started.

Through all the stuff I've tried, it is really clear that Trigger Point Therapy EXACTLY describes what has been going on and after treating myself, the results are better than any other I have gotten.

Other equipment that I use:
1. A mini 7" basketball - picked it up for about $6 at my local Sportmart and inflated it to roll on. This is a great tool for deep massage and can be left slightly deflated until you can take more pressure. There are various special rollers you can buy, but for a few bucks and IMHO these work better.

2. A LaCrosse ball - $9 or so for a 3-pack at Big-5. Recommended in the book, these are hard rubber and don't compress like a tennis ball does when you put your weight on it, so it's perfect for digging into those trigger points.

I've been spending time every day working it, and you do need to know that it can be painful when you put pressure on the trigger points. However, the relief from pain, increased range of motion and strength CAN be almost immediate. I'm sure it will take me a few more weeks, but I am truly amazed.

If you have any doubts about a possible serious injury you should probably have it checked out.

The book was less than $13 bucks on Amazon and I bought it together with "Trigger Point Self-Care Manual" by Donna Finando. This book is not quite as detailed as the Frozen Shoulder Workbook, and I would choose another Clair Davies book next time.

RUN, DON'T WALK, To AMAZON!!!

I hope to hear that some of you find yourselves healing faster through this info.

Good Luck and I'd be happy to provide any more info.

Thanks.

Hasib
Thanks for the info. I bought 2 of the books today. I'll go back for the other Clair Davies book next time.
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Old 02-19-2008, 11:44 PM   #8
Samuel Redwine
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

No, this doesn't really apply. Sorry.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:57 AM   #9
Ryan McLaughlin
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Hasib,

Thanks for the recommendation. I have been avoiding my shoulder issue for years. Mainly because it doesn't affect me when doing my chosen activity of mountain biking. Since starting crossfit....the shoulder has become more of a limitation and a significant frustration.

Bought the book yesterday. I look forward to reporting my experience with this information, either good or other.

Ryan
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Old 02-21-2008, 12:04 PM   #10
Stephen Flamm
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Re: For Everyone Struggling With Shoulder Problems!

Does this post sound like an advertisement as opposed to simply a suggestion?
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