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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 07-06-2011, 10:54 AM   #11
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Bryce Horrell View Post
Currently I am studying program/routine design involving things.
In some ways, program design is the easy part. The hard part is the human interaction, everything from movement/technique coaching to motivation.

Katherine
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Old 07-06-2011, 11:22 AM   #12
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Bryce Horrell View Post
I have lots experience in resistance training
This not directed at you in particular, but my biggest peeve is trainers who say this and yet have zero experience with strength sports like O-lifting, powerlifting, or strongman. In fact, they often have less than zero experience because half of what they think they know about strength sports is wrong.

I think anyone who wants to be an expert in resistance training should have some familiarity with the sports that specialize in resistance training. Football games are not won in the weight room but Olympic lifting championships are. Thus a trainer is best advised to take his resistance training cues from the athletes whose results absolutely depend on their weight room program. A trainer would not need to be an expert in those sports but they should at least have attended a few competitions, met a few of the athletes, know the basic rules, and have at least a mediocre competency in the lifts themselves.

You wouldn't hire a softball coach who had never seen a baseball game, not even on tv, would you? Would you hire a waterpolo coach who knew nothing at all about competitive swimming, not even the name of the events, would you? Wouldn't you think that odd? So why would anyone hire a strength trainer who had never competed in a strength competition, never been to a strength competition, never met a strength athlete, and didn't even know the basic rules like what lifts were involved? Yet that is exactly what most globo gym trainers are like. They're like my soccer coach from high school in the '70s, who had never seen a soccer game, never met a soccer player, couldn't kick a ball correctly to save his life. He was horrible, only we didn't know any better and didn't get to pick our coach.
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Old 07-06-2011, 12:25 PM   #13
Bryce Horrell
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
This not directed at you in particular, but my biggest peeve is trainers who say this and yet have zero experience with strength sports like O-lifting, powerlifting, or strongman. In fact, they often have less than zero experience because half of what they think they know about strength sports is wrong.

I think anyone who wants to be an expert in resistance training should have some familiarity with the sports that specialize in resistance training. Football games are not won in the weight room but Olympic lifting championships are. Thus a trainer is best advised to take his resistance training cues from the athletes whose results absolutely depend on their weight room program. A trainer would not need to be an expert in those sports but they should at least have attended a few competitions, met a few of the athletes, know the basic rules, and have at least a mediocre competency in the lifts themselves.

You wouldn't hire a softball coach who had never seen a baseball game, not even on tv, would you? Would you hire a waterpolo coach who knew nothing at all about competitive swimming, not even the name of the events, would you? Wouldn't you think that odd? So why would anyone hire a strength trainer who had never competed in a strength competition, never been to a strength competition, never met a strength athlete, and didn't even know the basic rules like what lifts were involved? Yet that is exactly what most globo gym trainers are like. They're like my soccer coach from high school in the '70s, who had never seen a soccer game, never met a soccer player, couldn't kick a ball correctly to save his life. He was horrible, only we didn't know any better and didn't get to pick our coach.

You make a good point.

Globo Gym is for real? I thought that was just a made up gym from the movie Dodge Ball lol.
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Old 07-06-2011, 12:30 PM   #14
Bryce Horrell
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Question Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
In some ways, program design is the easy part. The hard part is the human interaction, everything from movement/technique coaching to motivation.

Katherine
I understand your point and I definitely agree.

The thing is that designing proper programs that stretch on for 50+ weeks is not easy, at least for me. But then again I do not have ample experience with this so that makes sense.

Do you design programs? I would definitely like to discuss program design with people on this website. I would like to throw out hypotheticall situations and have each of us give our 2 cents about diet, routines, long term goals etc...

Would you be down for something like that?
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Old 07-06-2011, 01:07 PM   #15
Todd Rehm
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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The thing is that designing proper programs that stretch on for 50+ weeks is not easy, at least for me.
Does anybody design programs 50+ weeks out? I can understand having the macrocycles and peaking planned out for a season, but 50 weeks?
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Old 07-06-2011, 02:06 PM   #16
Bryce Horrell
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
In some ways, program design is the easy part. The hard part is the human interaction, everything from movement/technique coaching to motivation.

Katherine
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Originally Posted by Todd Rehm View Post
Does anybody design programs 50+ weeks out? I can understand having the macrocycles and peaking planned out for a season, but 50 weeks?
I used a 52 week program twice to gain 60 pounds of lean muscle.

It involved several hypertrohy workouts, strength workouts, and a fatloss workout(fatloss if you needed or wanted it).

the jist of hypertrophy and strength was that high reps compliment low reps and vise versa. I went through in this order: hypertrophy 1, hypertrophy 2, strength 1, strength 2, hypertrophy 3, strength 3, and then fatloss.
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Old 07-06-2011, 02:42 PM   #17
Eric A. Brown
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Bryce Horrell View Post
Hypothetically, if you were to pick a dream trainer/coach, what qualifications would you like to see them have?
A long track record of producing successful, injury-free athletes.

How they get to this point is up to them.
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Old 07-06-2011, 03:58 PM   #18
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Does anybody design programs 50+ weeks out? I can understand having the macrocycles and peaking planned out for a season, but 50 weeks?
Olympic athletes (and those who want to be) plan multi-year cycles around the Olympics and Olympic qualifiers.

Katherine
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Old 07-06-2011, 04:23 PM   #19
Todd Rehm
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
Olympic athletes (and those who want to be) plan multi-year cycles around the Olympics and Olympic qualifiers.

Katherine
Sure they do. That's why I said I can understand planning the macro-cycles and peaking, but I don't believe that Usain Bolt's coach could tell you what workout or workouts he'll be doing on July 6, 2012.
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Old 07-06-2011, 04:33 PM   #20
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: The Foundations of Personal Training

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I don't believe that Usain Bolt's coach could tell you what workout or workouts he'll be doing on July 6, 2012.
Actually he probably could. That's 3 weeks out from the London Olympics. Any coach worth his salt would already know what kind of workout will be on tap three weeks out from such a major competition.
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