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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 07-05-2011, 07:50 PM   #1
Bryce Horrell
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Question Would you consider the following information accurate?

Would you consider the following information to be true?

Fatloss through weight training: Inefficient total body exercise with short rest periods and high reps.

-Lets talk about your body’s daily energy expenditure. Your resting metabolic rate (your body’s rate of burning energy when at rest) consists of 60%-75% of your daily energy expenditure. The thermic effect of food (diet-induced thermogenesis) is the increase in energy expenditure, which happens after you eat a meal and lasts for several hours. Diet-induced thermogenesis accounts for 7%-10% of your daily energy expenditure. When you eat a meal your body has to digest, absorb, metabolize, and store food in the body. By eating you are speeding up your metabolism. The rest of your daily energy expenditure will come from your activities.

The point of me explaining energy expenditures is because you want to harness and manipulate them.

What you need to do is record what you eat for three days (how many calories you take in). Take the average of all three days and that will be your calorie intake. During these fatloss programs your calorie intake will remain as the number you calculated. It will not go lower or go higher. What will change are your meal timings and possibly your diet.

Eating a meal increases your energy expenditure (speeds the metabolism). This means that you want to eat the same amount of calories every day, except you want to spread them out into many small meals per day. By doing this you will essentially keep your resting metabolic rate at a higher rate. You want to take your daily intake of calories and separate them into 5-6 small meals a day. (That is if you don’t already eat that many meals per day. If you do, then keep doing the same thing)

-Muscles are made up of 70% water, 22% protein, and 8% fat.

To insure proper function and health you should make sure to drink lots of water. You need to drink water 2 hours before lifting, during lifting, and after lifting. Never lift dehydrated.

To insure that you lose fat you must eat healthy. Your diet should consist of:

Carbohydrates: Pasta, oats, brown rice, whole wheat breads, etc..

Protein: Lean meats such as fish, beef, pork, chicken, eggs, etc..

Fats: Peanuts, almonds, flaxseed oil supplement, sunflower seeds, etc..

Fruit and Veggies: Don’t forget to eat your greens!

Avoid: Processed foods, hamburgers, chips, soda, cake, candy, etc. These foods will halt your progress in fatloss.

Last edited by Bryce Horrell : 07-05-2011 at 07:54 PM.
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Old 07-05-2011, 09:30 PM   #2
Pearse Shields
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

I think that for the most part, people will disagree on your nutritional recommendations. For one thing, during weight loss your goal is to have the body use fat as a fuel source. As such, you should decrease your carbohydrate intake. There's also carbohydrate's effects on insulin levels, which is best avoided. A good diet of meat, vegetables, nuts and some fruit is generally the best way to go.
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:20 PM   #3
Bryce Horrell
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Smile Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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Originally Posted by Pearse Shields View Post
I think that for the most part, people will disagree on your nutritional recommendations. For one thing, during weight loss your goal is to have the body use fat as a fuel source. As such, you should decrease your carbohydrate intake. There's also carbohydrate's effects on insulin levels, which is best avoided. A good diet of meat, vegetables, nuts and some fruit is generally the best way to go.
If an athlete is only eating enough calories to maintain their body weight(current muscle mass) then fatloss programs should very well indeed be doing there job of creating an energy defeciency. Do we agree on that?

As for high/low glycemic carbohydrates I would have to agree on the facts. But I dont believe in cutting grains and pasta for everybody because, for certain athletes, glycogen stores are essential for energy during long periods of activity. How do you feel about that?

P.S. I am not arguing with you. I am just discussing fitness because I like to learn and get other peoples oppinions. Cheers!

Last edited by Bryce Horrell : 07-05-2011 at 10:28 PM.
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:41 PM   #4
Jared Ashley
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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As for high/low glycemic carbohydrates I would have to agree on the facts. But I dont believe in cutting grains and pasta for everybody because, for certain athletes, glycogen stores are essential for energy during long periods of activity. How do you feel about that?
I feel that while the statement about glycogen stores is correct, it is fairly unlikely that serious participants in endurance sports have a problem losing weight.
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Old 07-05-2011, 10:53 PM   #5
Bryce Horrell
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Smile Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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I feel that while the statement about glycogen stores is correct, it is fairly unlikely that serious participants in endurance sports have a problem losing weight.
Good point.

What about this hypothetical scenario?

You have an athlete who weighs 165 pounds and has a very fast metabolism. He wants to gain mass and weigh around 195 pounds or more. Along with strength training/resistance training, what foods would you advise him to eat? What carbohydrates would be involved?

Last edited by Bryce Horrell : 07-05-2011 at 10:58 PM.
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:25 PM   #6
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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I feel that while the statement about glycogen stores is correct, it is fairly unlikely that serious participants in endurance sports have a problem losing weight.
This. I certainly agree that very active people need plenty of carbs -- I fall into that category myself. But very active people don't generally have much, if any, weight to lose.

Katherine
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:26 PM   #7
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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Originally Posted by Bryce Horrell View Post
Good point.

What about this hypothetical scenario?

You have an athlete who weighs 165 pounds and has a very fast metabolism. He wants to gain mass and weigh around 195 pounds or more. Along with strength training/resistance training, what foods would you advise him to eat? What carbohydrates would be involved?
30 pounds? Eat anything that will hold still long enough.

Katherine
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:43 PM   #8
Pearse Shields
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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30 pounds? Eat anything that will hold still long enough.

Katherine
Agreed. I went from being about 140lbs to 150lbs in a couple of weeks by eating everything that came my way. I ate lots, lifted weights, and kept doing my normal other training. Over the next month I worked my way up to 155lbs. Since then, I've stayed around that weight, as it's generally the upper limit for my weight class for grappling and MMA.

Also, in regards to endurance athletes needing large glycogen stores, I do agree. But, for carb-loading I would recommend sweet potatoes over pasta any day. I've also seen a short-term study showing improved performance in endurance athletes following adaptation to a high-fat diet. I'd probably give the athletes the option of following a high-fat or a high-carb diet before writing a meal plan.

For people wanting to lose weight, who are just normal folk and not endurance athletes, I recommend high-intensity cardiovascular training as well as frequent strength training sessions. Intensity and effort, along with diet, are key to weight loss programmes.
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Old 07-06-2011, 05:08 AM   #9
Matt Thomas
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

I put on about 25-30 pounds once.

From what I remember my daily diet involved the following:

6 whole eggs
half gallon of whole milk
3 Tupperware's of chicken and beef chili
2 protein shakes (to include large amounts of peanut butter)
something for lunch
something for dinner (generally steak or fish)

*This Wasn't my entire diet. Just the things that were daily staples. There were generally side dishes with everything. Like a big bowl of oatmeal with the eggs.

This was a while ago, so it's hard to remember specifics. But I felt full all. the. time!

Last edited by Matt Thomas : 07-06-2011 at 05:11 AM.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:41 AM   #10
Matt Haxmeier
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Re: Would you consider the following information accurate?

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
30 pounds? Eat anything that will hold still long enough.

Katherine
I've gained 20-25lbs multiple times in the past couple of years. One time was doing GOMAD, the other was more like GONAD (Gallon of Nachos a Day).

A good plate of nachos has tons of protein, fat, and carbohydrates. And they're usually pretty reasonably priced per calorie.

Just make sure they put meat on them, and get the sour cream and guac, and make sure sure they have real cheese instead of "cheese sauce" or "cheese food" or some crap like that.

Last edited by Matt Haxmeier : 07-06-2011 at 10:44 AM.
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