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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 01-12-2011, 04:35 AM   #1
Sean Murray
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Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

I'm a big stickler for form when I do wod's but understand with fatigue and other things running around your head form can becomwe wayward. I was covering a class (started getting involved in running classes of late) recently and am interested on opinions as to how much to be on people's backs. Now two of the guys in a class yesterday were personal trainers, they knew the press up standards and we were doing Angie. They had the typical ego problem of going up against the clock and sacrificing the standard. I kept on them about the depth...rarely were they going chest to floor. Same thing happened with one of them on the squats where he wouldn't finish extension to fully open the hips. I berated him but he just wasn't having it from me.
Now i could quite easily get quite confrontational with class members but is there a fine line when dealing with this sort of thing. Do trainers turn a blind eye to keep clients happy or do you keep on at people during a wod. Aside from me saying no rep continuously and this guy getting seriously cheesed off...I wasn't sure to push it with them.
It's given me a new perspective of the varying standards and ultimately times on workouts of people I only previously trained with. Some are definitely giving themselves a false sense of ability. Thoughts please???
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Old 01-12-2011, 08:27 AM   #2
Brian Bedell
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

I think you are going to have to use your own judgment based on who you are training or advising. Some people appreciate the tough love, some will not. I think if it gets to berating, that might be too much. I mean you are also trying to keep clients, some men with big egos and most women don't want to be berated. You obviously need to treat someone who is training for the games different than regular Joe, IMO.

I know many of the affiliates will from time to time review for the class, or post on their blogs, exactly what "Rxd" means. And if you don't live up to that standard you simply don't get a "rxd" next to your name on the white board. that will teach them quick.

I was doing air squats the other day in a group wod and the trainer walked up to me and told me that I was not openning my hip all the way at the top, "and you know better." Internalizing that to me by her worked very well.
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Old 01-12-2011, 08:36 AM   #3
Rebecca Roth
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

It sort of depends on the format of your group class, and as Brian stated some folks will be more receptive than others, but you should always clearly state the standard before beginning the wod so there is no question, then when they fail to do it just say "that one didn't count, get your chest on the floor" no more than a couple times. If they continue to do something for partial ROM, as long as it isn't dangerous, then just wait till after to approach them and clarify what they were doing and if they felt that they weren't doing it properly, then help them with cues to do it properly if they are receptive. If you have consistent issues with an individual not hitting the standard and being inflexible to correct it, modify them - i.e. have them to press up to the Games standard of hands off the floor at the bottom, if they have problems with squat depth make them touch on a medball at the bottom.. etc.
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Old 01-14-2011, 02:35 AM   #4
Sean Murray
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

Great feedback.

They were both guys in this class as I tend not to have an issue with the ladies too much and far less ego involved.
I think with the amount of reps involved in an Angie they got caught up in wanting to have a time in a certain bracket and the only way for them tio get there was cutting corners.
I cued one of the guys 2-3 times on his squats with no response from him (if it had been the head coach cueing I know he'd have responded straight away). I was thinking about shouting no rep at him but thought it may be counter productive and end up drawing attention from the whole class towards him.

I think the quiet word at the end is the way to go for me. A subtle way of letting them know they've let themselves down and can do it better.
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Old 01-14-2011, 08:41 PM   #5
Veronica Carpenter
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

IMO it depends on whether or not it affects the safety of the exercise being performed. If bad form compromises safety and has potential for injury, I'd make corrections. If bad form is just cheating range of motion, I'd bring it to their attention, but really who are they cheating besides themselves?
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Old 01-14-2011, 09:33 PM   #6
Robert Fabsik
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

Vernonica makes some good points.

You might want to approach people who don't follow cues after class and help them make a decision that works best for them. If their breakdowns in form our dangerous, you should let them know of the risk and let them know you will continue to cue them because it is for their safety.

If their breakdown doesn't effect form, then I'd let them know it is not done as RX'd and also discuss with them how chasing a time while taking short cuts doesn't actually build the fitness that is being attempted. Shortened range of motion will in the long run limit mobility and worsen range of motion, it will also create weaknesses in the movements. If they never squat to the bottom, how will they build strength there? If they say they don't believe your chest should touch the deck in a pushup, then I'd come to an agreement that you'll keep an eye on their safety but won't go to hard on them on other issues but let them know the cost (their fitness).

Remember you can't change and make everyone perfect. If you've done all you could, the client then owns the responsibility.
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Old 01-17-2011, 02:27 PM   #7
Sean Murray
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

I want to be a stickler for form at the end of the day. I take the point that people are only cheating themselves but if you let them off the hook and potentially they are mopping up gym records or times of the day do you allow that sort of false sense of achievement? Does it breed contempt within the gym from other athletes who try to fulfil the criteria of movements?

To let it go to me is contrary to everything you are trying to coach to people. I don't mind being the bad guy as I'm sure some might take it that way but I hope they understand it is for their benefit. I do think you really have to reign some people in when the clock dominates all they are doing.

Some great input again though...thanks people!
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Old 01-17-2011, 03:05 PM   #8
Shannon Mullens
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

Sometimes you don't have to be the bad guy to correct form at the end of the day. Particularly with people who are just starting to shape up, they can be not "cheating" so much as "incapable of performing the movement at full ROM, and doing the best that they can."

Striking a balance rarely hurts - "hey, great time on that today, you did a good job pushing through, I know that was a brutal WOD. Next time, you might want to work a little on your push-ups; I know it was all you could manage, so as you get more fit, focus on getting your chest all the way to the ground, so you get more benefit out of the movement."

Unless of course these are people in awesome shape that are just being lazy, but sometimes even then, depending on the person if you treat them like they're new and out of shape, that can motivate too without you having to be the bad guy.

Edited to add: The person who tries to be the bad guy when it "seems" like I'm cheating is going to get my fist through his teeth, generally speaking. Because if I'm not going full ROM it's because I physically can't do more than I'm doing, or because I can't do more without giving up the ability to walk for the next few days. Alternately, if I'm really struggling, I'll probably punch you AND cry, and that's just all bad because then I hate you and I hate me. And you never really want to put someone in that state. I guess the point of this is - know your people, and make sure you're not so focused on what would be the best thing for someone to do for you that you forget that it's not going to be the right thing to do for everyone.
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Last edited by Shannon Mullens : 01-17-2011 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 01-17-2011, 03:06 PM   #9
Joey Harper
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

http://performancemenu.com/articles/...p?articleID=87

Sounds like these problems are coming from a focus on time.
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Old 01-17-2011, 06:06 PM   #10
Geoff Archibald
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Re: Form in WOD's - how hard to be?

Video tape them. If they are shorting the motion as much as you say they are, it should be hard to argue with video evidence.

Implement hand release pushups as the new standard and reset the gym records. Use butt balls for squats. My coach has done that from time to time to remind us what full depth feels like.

Personally, I want to know if I'm not doing the full ROM. You'll find out in a hurry if you ever enter a competition since the judges aren't very forgiving (at least they're not supposed to be).
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