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Old 12-22-2008, 02:00 PM   #21
Paul Shortt
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Re: symmetry

I third the scoliosis comment.

Strength differences are rarely so noticeable as this, and for those saying it would rectify it self with training, then i suggest you look into single limb work, i.e. lunges not squats etc etc, as the body will always favour the stronger side, so is unlikely to rectify.

Your scoliosis is unlikely to be down to a true leg length difference, as this is very rare - so if a chiro or PT tells you this, then take it with a pinch of salt. The most likely reason is that you have an imballance in your hips somewhere (e.g. weak glute med on one side, or tight hamstring etc etc )

A good physio will be able to work through this with you, but be wary, and awful lot of physio's will hinder more than help. Have a look at your flexibility around your hip region, and check how "level" your pelvis feels. If you do a squat in front of a mirror I'm willing to bet you are drifting over to one side. (probably the right leg side)..

Check some of Eric Cressey's stuff on t-nation, he's done a few articles on functional scoliosis.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:33 PM   #22
Michael Wengloski
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Re: symmetry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Shortt View Post
I third the scoliosis comment.

Strength differences are rarely so noticeable as this, and for those saying it would rectify it self with training, then i suggest you look into single limb work, i.e. lunges not squats etc etc, as the body will always favour the stronger side, so is unlikely to rectify.

Your scoliosis is unlikely to be down to a true leg length difference, as this is very rare - so if a chiro or PT tells you this, then take it with a pinch of salt. The most likely reason is that you have an imballance in your hips somewhere (e.g. weak glute med on one side, or tight hamstring etc etc )

A good physio will be able to work through this with you, but be wary, and awful lot of physio's will hinder more than help. Have a look at your flexibility around your hip region, and check how "level" your pelvis feels. If you do a squat in front of a mirror I'm willing to bet you are drifting over to one side. (probably the right leg side)..

Check some of Eric Cressey's stuff on t-nation, he's done a few articles on functional scoliosis.
It wasn't my hips/legs at all. It is arms/shoulder. But none the less, thanks for the input.

There's no way i'm going to get checked for scoliosis. If they do find out I have it then it's going to greatly limit the things I can do in the military, maybe even cause a medical seperation. No thanks.
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Old 12-22-2008, 03:36 PM   #23
Paul Shortt
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Re: symmetry

No, sorry i don't think my previous post was very clear.

The term scoliosis sounds worse than it is, as cases of genetic scoliosis are quite serious and cause noticeable health problems. Functional scoliosis (also known as pseudo-scoliosis) is simply an imballance in muscle strength or flexibility that causes the body to be out of sync. It often starts at the hips as this is where people generally have their worst flexibility issues, and is seen around the shoulder area as this is where the most unstable joint/section of the spine is found. It's a bit like a car that is sliding, over-correcting, so the slide looks worse further down the road. The pelvis is also the foundation block of the spine, and it's positioning is largely dependant on the legs' positioning.

It isn't a big issue, and i understand why you wouldn't want to get checked for it. All i'd recommend is having a look at this CLICKY, and then making an informed decision yourself. As you will see medical intervention is not necessary, just some balancing work and stretching. To give you an idea of how common it is, - one study found nearly 50% of people reporting instability or impingement in one shoulder, were found to have a lack of hip flexibility in the opposite hip - i.e. they had functional scoliosis.

If you're still not sold, then fair enough, but i would recommend going to see a physio on your own dime, and thus not going on your medical records (?) - as i have had this problem in the past, and ignoring it led to tight muscles, just getting tighter and the problem getting worse and worse.
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