CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Exercises
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-17-2006, 08:51 AM   #1
David Wood
Departed David Wood is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
 
Posts: 3,303
OK, I was doing the pullups WOD from the other day, and during the first rounds of 1 or 2 pullups, there's a lot of time to kill.

So I was doing deep unweighted squats, and observed that I could hold a good arch all the way down to about the last 2 or 3 inches (below parallel) . . . but when I truly went ***-to-ankles, my pelvis would "rotate under" and my lumbar region would round out.

It was completely involuntary . . . it just "happened". If I really clenched by back and stuck my butt out hard to prevent it . . . I didn't go down the last 3 inches.


Tight hamstrings, I presume?

Worth working on? (i.e., will getting deeper with better form, which looks like it means a lot of stretching) improve my lifts?

Thanks in advance,
Dave
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2006, 09:05 AM   #2
Petr Ruzicka
Member Petr Ruzicka is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Prague  Prague
Posts: 65
I used to have this condition as well, and still do if I'm not fully concentrate on excercise.

What help me a LOT was overhead squat, bar only, go to the bottom position and, as Dan Jon, explained somewhere, do budha belly, big chest.
Check out this http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/22/18615.html
It took me some time but now I'm able to do it 'almost' correctly.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2006, 10:10 AM   #3
Dan Snyder
Member Dan Snyder is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Denver  CO
Posts: 123
David, I start to do the same thing when I don't aggressively pursue my flexibility training. For me it seems to be hams like you mention and glutes (both maximus and medius). OHS has also done wonders - both weighted and unweighted.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2006, 10:46 AM   #4
Mike Minium
Member Mike Minium is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Oakland  CA
Posts: 860
Yep, what they said. It usually happens because the athlete cannot lengthen the hamstring for those last couple of inches.

I have yet to come across any quick way of eliminating the "tuck-under" phenomenon. Just lots of squats and glute-ham work (of all varieties) . But if anyone else has any tips, I'm all ears.

Mike

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2006, 11:30 AM   #5
Jerry Hill
Affiliate Jerry Hill is offline
 
Jerry Hill's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Alexandria  VA
Posts: 649
Hey guys - how about not squatting that low? We are talking 3 inches below parallel!

It seems that the issue is stabilizing the pelvis, so let’s not forget about the abs. Proper abdominal recruitment in the hole could make all the difference.
The first thing that should 'flex' out of the hole is the abs - get in the deep squat position and 'flex' your abs, you should bounce up a bit - relax, flex, relax, flex and so on...you will get into an up and down bouncing rhythm.
Anyhow, this is a example of the role the abs play in the hole so take a look at how 'tight' you keep your abs during those last 2-3".
Hope this helps.

Jerry
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 08:39 AM   #6
David Wood
Departed David Wood is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
 
Posts: 3,303
Many thanks to all . . .
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 11:49 AM   #7
Dan Colson
Affiliate Dan Colson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Rockford  Illinois
Posts: 148
Coach had a great tool for practice, with a bar on squat stands about chest height or so set your dynamax ball, reach forward arms above the bar and squat without touching the bar, you will not lose the arch and after a few reps you will get all the way down, I also notice often times people don't let their hips open up when squatting limiting depth. Another tool is to stand facing a wall and try to get deep as close to the wall as you can, if your knees hit the wall your not opening up the hips, if you want to fall backwards keep your back and stomach in play. Can anyone go deep with the toes touching the wall? I have corrected a lot of squats with these two drills. Also, just squatting deep on heels and pushing the knees out with the elbows helps the flexibility when squatting. be sure to balance on the heels, and try to arch before standing. I hope some of the descriptions make sense.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 01:26 PM   #8
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
That is aparticularly important range of movement to obtain IMO. It illustrates an area of potential injury as the posterior chain (glutes, hammies) are not being loaded throughout the full ROM.

It is not then surprising when a tear happens high up near the hip at the origin. The Starting Strength book as well as Dan John's recomendations of the goblet squat, bag-o-potatoes and the squat stand w/bar ala CF HQ are awesome tools to chase this movement.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 03:31 PM   #9
Kevin McKay
Member Kevin McKay is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: albany   ca
Posts: 1,110
I have a weird hip problem, maybe one of you guys can shed some light. When I squat just before upper legs are parallel to the floor something gets pinched in the front of my left hip joint very painful and I need to lose the lordotic arch to go any lower… I get the same thing when I do any type of knees to chest stretch. Any idea what this might be and how to correct it? When I squat below the pinch point I sometimes get back pain and numbness in my leg. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2006, 03:41 PM   #10
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
Kevin-

Sounds like your hip flexor is getting impinged. Loads of lunge stretches should help. A good PT or ART practitioner can work wonders also.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Deep and overhead squat unsafe according to scientists?? Rick Rakauskas Exercises 20 06-29-2007 03:54 PM
My overpronounced lordotic arch Yael Grauer Injuries 5 12-02-2006 06:58 AM
Deep Squat Cleans Jeff Vale Exercises 8 11-15-2006 01:32 PM
Proper form for a deep squat Brian Reckdenwald Exercises 8 10-24-2006 09:35 AM
Arch of right foot F Injuries 1 01-10-2004 11:59 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.